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Full text of "The Massachusetts daily collegian [microform]"

The Sensuous Summer 



Summer session — when 
swingshifters from around the 
world converge on the UMass 
campus to learn, to grow, to cram 
a lot of knowledge within a short 
span, to meet new friends; when 
older students try to make up a few 
credits while sweating out, 
slacking-off or shaping-up for the 
old routine-will prove to be the 
threshold of a new relationship. 

The 1972 UMass Summer Session 
begins today with registration at 
Boy den Gymnasium. Classes start 
tomorrow and will run through 
Aug. 18. 

Due to the limited number of 
places, enrollment priorities have 
been established this year. First 
priority goes to Swing Shift fresh- 
men, those who begin classes in the 
summer, leave for the fall 
semester and return in the spring 
to fill vacancies. 



The second priority goes to 
UMass seniors who expect to 
graduate this September and third 
to area teachers and master of arts 
in teaching students. 

A special feature this year is an 
institute offering Hispanic 
languages, Carribean literature 
and allied subjects for teachers in 
schools with non-English speaking 
children. One of the first in the 
nation, the institute was 
established in response to a new 
Massachusetts law that orders 
bilingual education to be provided 
in a school district that has 20 or 
more non-English speaking pupils. 

A total Summer Session 
enrollment of approximately 2800 
is expected. 

To keep summer students 
program entertained, enlightened 
and informed, the UMass summer 
program has arranged for art 



exhibitions, movies, summer 
theater productions, concerts, The 
Crier, and WMUA. 

A double feature film series will 
get underway tomorrow with the 
showing of "I Love You, Alice B. 
Toklas" and "Anatomy of a 
Murder." (look below for details) 
Other movie highlights include 
The Cardinal", "A Raison in the 
Sun", "The Birds," Whatever 
Happened to Baby Jane, "The 
Guns of Navarone," "Splendor in 
the Grass," and several others. 

The UMass Summer Theater will 
present two major productions. "A 
Collage: Love and Marriage, Etc." 
which includes Chechov's "The 
Proposal and Heywood's John, 
John, Tib and Father John is 
scheduled for production from July 
27-29 and from August 3-5, and 
Tennessee William's classic "The 




University of Massachusetts 
June 26, 1972 Volume 1, Issue 1 

"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Summer 

Registration 

In Boyden 

Registration for the regular term 
of the Summer Session will take 
place on Monday, June 26, during 
the hours of 9 a.m. to 12 noon and 
1 : 30 to 4:30 p.m. on the third floor 
of Boyden Gymnasium. A 
representative from each 
department offering a course 
should be present to process course 
changes and to transmit the course 
rosters to the departments at the 
close of the day. The following 
special phone lines have been set 
up in Boyden for this day only to 
reach those actively engaged in the 
registration process: 
Undergraduate Registrar 
5-0750 

Graduate Registrar 

5-0752 

Bursar 

5-0753 

Faculty 

5-0751 



Glass Menagerie" set for August 9- 
13. 

Exhibits & Lectures 

There will also be a number of 
art and photography exhibitions 
scheduled continuously throughout 
the summer. Several sales of 
original prints and art work will 
also be held. These include a 
lecture by famed cartoonist Gahan 
Wilson, an all day Indian culture 
program entitled "White Roots of 
Peace: The Mohawk Nation at Ak- 
wesasne," and an evening of 
reading poetry of the Latin World 
and the Caribbean rounds out the 
summer calendar. 

Among the varied musical 
presentations will be Joshua 
Rifkin, ragtime and jazz pianist, a 
concert by the Mahavishnu Or- 
chestra with John McLaughlin, 
balladeer Martin Best, Preser- 
vation Hall Jazz Band of New 
Orleans, and a folk concert 
featuring Leo Kottke, Bill Staines 
and Mike Cataldo. These will be 
outdoor concerts (weather per- 
mitting) except for Rifkin and the 
Mahavishnu Orchestra. Also, the 
Chuck Davis Dance Company will 
present a dance concert and 
master class and the "Portable 
Circus: Comedy in Concert", an 
improvisational theater group, will 
poke fun at television. 
No Charge 

The above mentioned programs 
are open to the public with no 
charge except for the Joshua 
Rifkin and the Chuck Davis Dance 
Company concerts and the UMass 
summer theater productions. 
UMass summer students who 
present their I.D.'s will, however, 
be able to pick up tickets for Rifkin 



and Davis free of charge. As 
always, where seating is limited, 
UMass summer students will be 
admitted first. 

The New England Council of 
Camera Clubs will hold a 
photographic exhibit and com- 
petition Friday through Sunday, 
July 7, 8 and 9. One hundred six- 
teen camera clubs are represented 
by the Council and the theme for 
the exhibition and competition is 
unlimited. The show and com- 
petition will be held in the Campus 
Center Music Listening Room. 
Exhibits and sales of original 
works will take place on three 
dates in July. Graphics and Prints 
from Ferdinand Roten Galleries, 
Inc. The final exhibit and sale will 
be held on Wednesday, July 26. 
This exhibit of original Oriental 
Art from Marson Limited includes 
Indian miniatures, 18th Century 
Chinese woodcuts and con- 
temporary prints. 

Area Entertainment 

Other area entertainment will be 
provided by local movie theaters 
such as Campus Cinemas 1, 2, and 
3, Amherst Cinema, Hadley Drive- 
in, Calvin Theater and The 
Academy of Music. Live theater 
will also be available at Mt. 
Holyoke Summer Theater and the 
Storrowton Music Tent. Concerts 
by the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
and guests are performed in at 
Tanglewood in Lenox each 
weekend. The Crier will present a 
regular column on what is going on 
around here, including the above 
mentioned and radio and television 
highlights and more. Pinball 
machines are available in the 
Campus Center Concourse. 




ACTION Marks Anniversary 



Cinema 
Series, Starts 

"I Love You, Alice B. 
Toklas" and "Anatomy of a 
Murder" will open the double 
feature film series sponsored 
by the Program Council 
tomorrow night in the Campus 
Center Auditorium. 

Peter Sellers stars in 
"Toklas" as a dedicated 
lawyer who eats some special 
brownies-the kind with grass in 
them-and starts to change into 
a dedicated social dropout. 
Screen time is planned for 7. 

James Stewart, Lee Remick, 
Ben Gazzara, Arthur O'Con- 
nell, Eve Arden, and Kathryn 
Grant star in Otto Preminger's 
"Anatomy of a Murder". Show 
time for this movie is planned 
at 9 PM. 

Admittance to both movies is 
free to all, but seating priority 
will be given to students 
bearing summer session I.D.'s 
from UMass. 



Walter J. McCurdy 

Reflections, 

Old Ones, 

Open Today 

Reflections by John Smith and 
The Old Ones by Walter J. Mc- 
Curdy are the two exhibitions 
which will open the UMass Sum- 
mer Program. 

Smith's exhibit is a 
photograpghic display, located in 
the Student Union Art Gallery from 
today through July 15. Smith 
himself is currently President and 
Chairman of the Board of 
Reflections unlimited, Inc., a 
multi-media communications 
corporation. He is a professional 
free-lance free-lance photographer 
and film maker. Smith has been 
the editor and publisher of Reflect 
magazine since 1970. A receitipn 
for his opening will be Thursday at 
7 PM. 

McCurdy's exhibit will run from 
today through July 6, and July 10- 
July 30. His pen and ink drawings 
of the American Indians will be on 
display in the Music Room of the 
Campus Center. They may be 
viewed from 10-10 Monday-Friday. 
McCurdy is currently a graphic 
artist in the Pennsylvania State 
University's Division of In- 
structional Services. In the Early 
1960's he lived with a Hopi Indian 
Family in the Southwest. An 
opening reception for McCurdy is 
planned for 7 PM tomorrow night. 



University Year for Action, a part of the federal 
ACTION agency, is just finishing it's first year 
working against poverty. July first marks the 
university of this program which has involved 80 
students from UMass, and hundreds of other college 
students throughout the United States. 

Unique Education 
The idea of University Year for Action (UYA) is to 
provide a unique educational program for college 
students. It offers them academic credit for a year's 
voluntary service in community anti-poverty related 
work. UYA places students in selected agencies and 
provides them with a living stipend. They become a 
regular staff member of that agency, and live in the 
community they are serving. At the same time they 
earn at least 30 academic credits through in- 
dependant studies and special courses at their 
respective college or university. 

During the past year, the UYA program at UMass 
has had 80 students working in 25 agencies in the 
areas of health, education, economic development, 
administration of justice, housing, and social ser- 



vices. These agencies include places like Belcher- 
town State School, Westfield Detention Center, 
Holyoke Legal Services, Springfield Area Life and 
Times newspaper, Friendly House in Worcester, and 
Northampton Correctional Services. 

Phase III of the UYA Program, starting in Sep- 
tember, will place more than 70 students from UMass 
in about 15 agencies. These students will be training 
during the month of August before becoming regular 
staff members at their agency for a year. 

Summer Recruitment 

YUA has openings for students in its Phase III 
program and will have a recruitment table at sum- 
mer registration. Are you a UMass student with in- 
terest and perhaps special talents that would lend 
themselves to this antipoverty program? 

If you are interested in doing something of real 
value to society, while earning academic credit, then 
you should talk to the UYA people at summer 
registration, today at Boyden gym. Or visit the 
ACTION House on East Pleasant Street or call 545- 
1381 for more information. 




Action Program Headquarters 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



r 



^ 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, University of 
Massachusetts Offices are located in the Campus Center, Student Activities Area, University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for the contents. 
No copy is censored by the administration before Publication. Represented for national ad 
vertising by National Educational Advertising Services, inc. 



Editor-in-Chief 
Continuity Director 
Photo Staff 

News Staff 

Moral Guidance 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Larry Gold, Stephen Schmidt, 

Carl Nash, Karin Ruckhaus 

Brenda Furtak, Gil Salk, 

Kathy Edmund, Elleni Koch 

Snoopy, The Wizard, 

The R.S.O. Team 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



Art Buchwald 



Bugging The Enemy 



WASHINGTON-The arrest of 
five men in the Democratic 
National Committee headquarters 
last weekend has caused a great 
deal of consternation in high 
Republican circles. All leading 
officials deny they had any 
knowledge of the incident, which 
was planned and executed by the 
same people who gave us the Bay 
of Pigs. 

While most people are mystified 
as to how it was possible that high 
Republican figures did not know of 
the raid, it was easily explained to 
me by a friend who is very close to 
the Republican Party. 

Protective Reaction 

"The decision to raid the 
Democratic National Committee 
headquarters in Washington was 
made as a protective reaction 
strike. We knew the Democrats 
were massing a buildup for an 
attack on the Republicans in July, 
and it was in our interests to 
destroy their files before they were 
used against us." 

"But wasn't this raid a violation 
of the presidential orders not to 
bug the enemy's telephones unless 
the Republicans were attacked 
first?" 

"The general in the field who 
made the decision may have gone 
beyond the literal intention of the 
rules, but he believed his actions 
were justified on the basis of in- 
telligence reports that the 
Democrats were going to invade 
Miami." 

Was Off Limits 

"But at the time the raid was 
made, the Democratic Party 
headquarters was considered off 
limits as a target area," I said. 
"Surely high Republican officials 
must have been aware of what was 
going on." 

"As far as the high officials were 
concerned, they had no knowledge 
of the raid. In fact, they had given 
out strict orders that illegal strikes 
against the Democrats had to be 
cleared with them. Somehow 
communications got fouled up, 
which can happen during an 
election year." 

"Do you believe a raid of this 
type, if successful, could have 
changed me outcome in Novem- 
ber?" 

Fighting the Enemy 
We are fighting a tough, 
ruthless enemy who will stop at 
nothing to impose its type of 
government on the American 
people." he said. "We cannot sit 
idly by and allow them to take over 
the White House. 




"Perhaps we didn't play by all 
the rules of the game, but I can 
assure you the Democrats are not 
playing by the rules either. This 
incident has been blown all out of 
proportion. 



Because it Failed 

"Had the raid succeeded no one 
would have said a word. But 
because it failed, everyone is up in 
arms. Instead of criticizing the 
people behind the attack, I think 
they should be congratulated for 
putting their party first." 

"But," I said, "aren't you 
escalating the election by bugging 
the Democrats, and photographing 
their files?" 

"We did not escalate the elec- 
tion. They did. They're the ones 
who are trying to kick us out. Their 
leaders have said as much. The 
President has said many times he 
would gree to a cease-fire, 
providing the Democrats give up 
their political ambitions. But the 
honor of the Presidency is at stake, 
and Mr. Nixon has no intention of 
giving the country away." 

Court-martial? 

"Will the Republicans court- 
martial the people responsible for 
the raid on Democratic 
headquarters?" 

"No, but they will be demoted 
and put on a pension." 

"That's tough," I said. 

"Perhaps. But their worst 
punishment is that they will never 
be allowed to bug for the 
Republican Party again." 

Copyright 1972, Los Angeles Times. 





The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Three 



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fat? 



'WELL, SO FAR, SO GOOD . 



Buchwald Hires Crier 



Art Buchwald, whose columns 
will appear in The Crier, has been 
called the most comic American 
observer of the world scene since 
Mark Twain. 

Born in Mount Vernon, New 
York, on October 20, 1925, Buch- 
wald and his three sisters lived in 
an orphanage and a series of foster 
homes before finally settling in 
Queens with their father, Joseph, a 
curtain manufacturer. By then 
Buchwald ' was 16 and an in- 
different student. 

On his seventeenth birthday he 
joined the United States Marine 
Corps. He was assigned to the 



Fourth Marine AirWtng-afld spent 
three and a half years in the 
Pacific. 

On. his return to civilian life, 
Buchwald entered the University 
of Southern California. He wrote a 
column for the college newspaper 



and was managing editor of the 
campus humor magazine. 

Without waiting for a degree, 
and driven by an urge to taste life 
in Paris, Buchwald left the 
University in 1948. He bought a 
one-way ticket to Frpice with his 
war bonus check, and when his 
money ran out, took a job with 
"Variety" magazine in Paris. 

In 1949 the writer presented a 
trial column to the European 
edition the New York Herald 
Tribune, composed of offbeat data 
on Parisian night life, it brought 
Buchwald a job on the staff. 

By 1952 Buchwald's columns had 
become so popular they were 
brought to readers in the United 
States. Americans took to the 
writer's new brand of humor and 
within a few years Buchwald 
became a permanent fixture in the 
column-writing business. 

Early in the 1960s Buchwald 
switched his home base from Paris 



to Washington, D.C. In recent 
years his columns nave featured 
humor found in the nation's 
capital. His home newspaper now 
is the Washington Post. 

Although most of Buchwald's 
columns are now written from 
Washington, the writer will go 
anywhere he thinks there's a good 
story-and do just about anything 
to get it. He has chased goats up 
and down the mountains of 
Yugoslavia, climbed trees to get a 
bird's-eye view of the races at 
Longchamps and traveled to 
Turkey for a firsthand impression 
of a Turkish bath. 

Buchwald is the author of a 
dozen best-selling books. He also 
appears regularly on the lecture 
circuit because he enjoys meeting 
people. 

The popular writer is married to 
the former Ann McGarry. They 
have three children- Joel, Conchita 
Mathilda and Marie Jennifer. 



WHYN Supports ROTC Credit 



We agree 100%! 

We've editorialized before about the advantages 
of exposing a substantial percentage of future 
military leaders to the exchange of ideas and 
broadening influences that a civilian college is 
supposed to provide. 

If there are legitimate questions about the 
academic qualifications of ROTC instructors this 
should be worked out between the university 
administration and the armed services. There are 
many career military personnel eminently 
qualified to teach at the college level. 

Students who are voluntarily looking forward to 
serving as military officers should be encouraged 
by the people of Massachusetts and by the 
University. J 



The Massachusetts House of Representatives 
has passed a resolution urging that the UMass 
continue granting academic credit for ROTC 
courses until all courses offered at the University 
have been reviewed and evaluated. 

We urge the University trustees to honor this 
request. 

Sponsors of the resolution, Representatives 
Desmond of Lowell and Hogan of Everett, note 
that more than 4,000 students and faculty mem- 
bers have signed petitions asking that ROTC with 
credit be continued. 

The representatives themselves say, "at a state 
university, where the professions range from 
Recreation to Landscaping, there can be no 
justification for singling out the military 
profession and excluding it." 



Campus Carousel 



Republicans And Degrees 



By TONY GRANITE 
HEADLINE OF THE WEEK 

appears in the Illinois State U. 
Vidette: "Try Marriage for A 
Year." 

• * • 

"NO" is the new write-in can- 
didate endorsed by the Vanguard 
of Portland (Ore) State U. In a 
recent four-line editorial, the 
editors wrote that they "could not 
conscientiously endorse any 
Republican candidate for the 
Presidential nomination. There is 
only one active candidate on the 
ballot and he is unacceptable. Vote 

NO' on the Republican ballot" 

» * * 

TEACHING BY THE HOUR is 

the thing of the Washington State 
Legislature, according to recent 
coverage in the Washington State 
U. Daily Evergreen. 

A new piece of legislation 
prescribes a minimum of 10 hours 
a week in the classroom for every 
professor in all the state unive»- 
sities. Profs at the state colleges 



must spend 12 hours a week there. 
And faculty of the state's com- 
munity colleges are told to spend 15 
hours in classrooms. 

The clincher is that the average 
faculty classroom hour must be 
increased by five per cent. 

The WSU Institutional Studies 
organization says that the 
Legislators acted "in a punitive 
degree... It's their way of at least 
assuring themselves that the 
state's money is being used con- 
structively for teaching." 

Director Ross Armstrong of the 
survey program says the new law 
results from the legislators' 
reaction to campus demon- 
strations in Spring 1970. 

"The legislators blamed the 
faculty for not making the students 
behave. So the lawmakers 
suggested the professors get back 
to the classroom and start teaching 
again." B 

As to how they arrived at the 10 
hours teaching schedule, Arm- 
strong says: "...by figuring a 
professor would teach three 



classes a week. The instructor 
would also need several hours out 
of class to prepare for each course. 
Another 10 hours out of the week 
would keep the professor involved 
with various committees and 
conducting research. That gives 
you a total of 30 hours a week. With 
a schedule like that, you are not 
going to have much time to carry 
on other extracurricular ac- 
tivities." 



Letters 



To the Editor: 

Congratulations on your 

magnificant first issue. Keep up 

the fabulous work. Regret it isn t 

daily. . 

Free Press Committee oi 

The Publications Review Board 




Wilson, Cartoonist, To Open 
Summer Program Wednesday 



GAHAN WILSON 



Gahan Wilson, creator of "goulish, depraved, and 
traumatic cartoons" which have appeared in 
Playboy, Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Audubon 
magazines, will explain his work at a lecture and 
slide show at the Campus Center Auditorium on 
Wednesday at 8 P.M. 

Samples of his work will be available before and 
after his lecture, and during a coffee hour in the 
lounge adjacent to the Auditorium. 

Wilson is expected to include in his discussion the 
history of his association with Playboy, the life of a 
free lance cartoonist and an attempt to answer the 
question, "Mr. Wilson, where do you get all those 
weird ideas?" 

Wilson, a descendent of such authentic American 
folk heroes as William Jennings Bryan and P.T. 
Barnum, is a graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago 
and the first student there who was an admitted 
cartoonist. 

He cannot remember wanting to be a shortstop or a 
brain surgeon or anything other than a cartoonist. 
Childish scrawls of monsters done in his pre-literate 
days indicate his bent towards the fantastic was set at 
an early age. 

He has three cartoon collections to his credit: 



GRAVESIDE, MANNER, THE MAN IN THE 
CANNIBAL POT, and the current Simon and 
Schuster book, I PAINT WHAT I SEE. He has 

illustrated a quantity of children's books, and has 
been involved in numerous advertising campaigns, 
sometimes even animating his creatures for TV. 

Wilson has found himself becoming a political 
cartoonist. The reason for this, he claims, is that the 
absurdities in the daily papers have made the horrors 
of the imagination small pickings. 

"Where is Frankenstein, now that Christian 
Barnard's here?" he asks, and points out that 
Dracula pales in comparison with Texas tower 
snipers or manufacturers of potentially deadly 
Christmas toys, "Not that I intend to give up vam- 
pires." 

But he finds that his cartoons on ecology, for in- 
stance, are being increasingly used by action groups 
and Senatorial committees to help pound home the 
point that mankind's ill using his home planet to a 
near unbelievable degree. 

He is married, has a dog, and eats three meals a 
day at the usual times. What he does during nights of 
the full moon, he avers, is no one's business but his 
own." 



The Federal Trade Commission 
today ruled that a Columbus, Ohio 
school is "little more than a 
diploma mill" and that two in- 
volved nonprofit corporations 
could not escape the FTC's 
jurisdiction solely because of their 
nonprofit status. 

Accordingly, the FTC issued a 
cease and desist order against the 
two firms, Ohio Christian College 
(of Calvary Grace Christian 
Churches of Faith, Inc.), and 
Alpha Psi Omega Society, located 
in Columbus. 

The order also cites four in- 
dividuals who control and operate 
them, Alvin O. and Leeta O. 
Langdon, Gene Thompson and 
Jerry Weiner. 

In determining exemptions for 
nonprofit corporations, Com- 
missioner David S. Dennison, Jr. 
said in the opinion of the Com- 
mission, "the question is not 
whether a corporation amassed 
profit, but how it disposed of such 
profit. From the facts available to 
the Commission, we find the 
relationship between OCC and the 
individual respondents in dealing 
with the dissipation of profits 
strikingly similar to that existing 
between a closely-held commercial 
corporation and its officer- 
shareholders. The cavalier 
treatment of the corporate assets 
and finances leads us to conclude 
that respondents considered them 
their own. The individual 
respondent, A.O. Langdon, has 
complete control over the purse 
strings, he sets all salaries (in- 
cluding his own), determines all 
allocation and expenditures, signs 
all checks and exercises plenary 
power over the affairs of the 
school. The record shows the 
corporation was organized and 
controlled so that the individual 
respondents could take what they 
wanted prior to any further 
disposition or comingling of fund- 
s." 

The Section of the Federal Trade 
Commission Act which exempts 
corporations from Commission 
jurisdiction "operates as a shield 
for legitimate, bona fide 



eleemosynary institutions to 
protect them from unwarranted 
governmental interference. To use 
this protection as a sword and 
suffer the public to be injured, 
cheated and bilked is quite another 
matter. 

"...Ohio Christian College and 
Alpha Psi Omega have, using the 
shield of nonprofit corporate 
status, misled and deceived the 
public. Prevention of these acts 
were and are the function of the 
Federal Trade Commission as 
envisaged by the Congress." 

Commenting upon respondents' 
deceptive tactics, Commissioner 
Dennison said, "The methods 
adopted and used by the Ohio 
Christian College reduced it to 
little more than a 'diploma mill'. 
The brochure sent to prospective 
students' who respond to OCC's 
numerous advertisements in 
national periodicals imply that the 
college was of the traditional type 
offering degrees of the character of 
accredited institutions. (As found 
by the examiner) 'Prospective 
students are told in the catalogue 
that they may pursue resident 
study but if not able to afford it 
may get Home Study (or Ex- 
tension) courses at a fraction of the 
cost of resident study. This is 
touted as a new educational plan. 
The prospective student is 
promised credit for experience 
which will reduce his home study 
requirements. Even an honorary 
degree is offered "to eligible 
candidates in recognition of their 
accomplishments and 
achievements". In earlier 
catalogues it was made clear that a 
fee of $50 would be required with 
each application to be applied 
toward the tuition but in the case of 
honorary degrees the applicants' 
contribution of a full $100 would be 
needed'. As one student, a Penn- 
sylvania public school teacher 
seeking his Master's Degree, 
found, the OCC degree received 
was virtually meaningless. 

"Alpha Psi Omega is pur- 
portedly a professional society 

(Continued on Page 6) 



FTC StopsSchools WFCR Details July Programs 



WFCR-88.5 FM radio, a public, 
non-profit, non-commercial station 
being broadcast from Amherst will 
present new fare this summer. 
WFCR will begin new series on an 
experimental basis, sharing some 
special programs and bringing the 
1972 Berkshire Festival at 
Tanglewood live and in steTeo, 
according to station spokesman. 

The month of July will be 
dominated by the 1972 Democratic 
Convention being held in Miami, 
and will have alternative coverage 
beginning three days before the 
convention from Pacifica Radio. 
"A staff of over 15 journalists from 
Pacifica will provide some unique 
perspectives on the convention to 
supplement television's coverage. 
Dick Gregory will be on hand to 
provide a black overview to each 
day's events combining humor 
with his sharp political insights," 
she said. "Dolores Costello will be 
following black delegate actions 
from start to finish," she added. 
"Before the convention begins we 
will have extensive coverage of all 
credentials fights, the role of 
Peace Movement leaders Abbie 
Hoffman and Jerry Rubin, a look 
at the Women's Caucus, welfare 
rights demonstrations, the role of 
the media in Miami, police and 
security preparations, and the city 
of Miami iteself . The coverage will 
begin on July 7," she added. 

WFCR will bring drama back 
into radio this summer with the 
BINAURAL DRAMA series and 
the AMHERST RADIO 

THEATER. "Mondays at 8:30 p.m. 
the BINAURAL DRAMA series 
will present some outstanding 
contemporary radio plays 
recorded in binaural sound, a 
special technique that literally 
places the listener in the middle of 
things when listening with stereo 
headsets," said the spokesman. 



AMHERST RADIO THEATER 
will be a half-hour show on Wed- 
nesday nights at 10:30 that's being 
turned over to the staff. "If nobody 
does anything it may turn out to be 
just repeats," she said. 

Tuesdays in July will be 
highlighted by a series of specials. 
On Tuesday, July 4, MORNING 
PRO MUSICA will be produced 
locally. 

"That night at 8:30 Roberta 
Flack can be heard in a concert 
recorded in Washington this Spring 
on the occasion of Human Kindness 
Day," she said. July 11 will feature 
Democratic Convention coverage. 

July 18, at 8:30, a special on The 



Living Theater, featuring some 
new material recorded recently at 
Smith College, will be presented. 

On July 25 at 8:30, WFCR will air 
a special stereo production of 
Shakespeare's As You Like It. 

"CAT'S CRADLE on Saturdays 
at 7:30 is some different kids' 
programming," she said. THE 
WOMEN'S HOUR, Mondays at 
7:30 and Thursdays at 1:00 will 
present some different women's 
programming. The WOMAN'S 
SHOW from Boston will also be 
aired, Fridays at 8:30, and 
FOLKROOTS will be broadcast 
twice weekly, Saturday afternoons 
and Thursday nights at 10:00. 




"But I only came in for an oil change! " 

No Automotive Rip Off 's 
SPENCER'S Mobil STATION 

161 NO. PLEASANT ST., AMHERST ( Next to P.O.) 
FREE ESTIMATES 
Open 24 hours — Road Service — 256-8426 



Double Feature 



Peter Seller's 
in 

"I Love You, 
Alice B. 
Toklas'l 

7 p.m. 



Lee Remiek 
James Stewart 

Anatomy of 
a Murder 



9 p.m. 




Campus Center Auditorium 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 



W«dn«dty. Jim 2t 
FrM MnlttlM 



Humarist/CstlOOnist CaMpil £•«*" Auditorium - 8 p.m. 

LECTURE WITH SLIDES Ctfto H..r mio***, 



2£**M 





WE'RE FORCED TO MOVE out ot our giant warehouse by the end of June, 
j .L ."tractors don't have our new building ready yet. It may be 

to ihe ceiling in all our .tore*. Wo have one b.g w ~«LVwe1k^o"soM a 
youTown deal, H you don't like the one wo've got. ONE WEEK to sell a 
warehouse fun of merchandise - 

June 26 - July 1 

Quantities Limited - First Come - First Served 



Barns 





RADIO 



STEREO RECEIVERS, 
TUNERS, AMPLIFIERS 



f . * 9 



e*e '> ••> »•,-,, y 






Fisher 201 

[HO weft *M/fM rectivtr 

[Fisher 450T 

IN watt AM/rM receive r , K— S i coal: tea. 

J Pioneer SX440 

win mifnwi iitrte reswifwr 

Pioneer SX-9000 

1 140 weft AM/rM stereo roc. be I It m revtre 

Panasonic SA-6000 

ISO weft AM/TM receiver 

lLafayette LR-1 500TA 

I oratt tee, rot to* AM/FM receiver 

j Lafayette LR- 1 000B 

I IM watt KM/fM receiver 

iFisher 301 

140 wen MgffM receiver wHh ceblaet 

JFfsher401 

[•SO weft MM/FM receiver, wlrefest rsraofe c 

IBL SA660 

t» weft RMS stereo eetelifltr 



lLafayette LR775 

I receiver 



lyett 

I AM/FM. 



jPioneer TX-9000 

l&M/FM stereo teeer 

Eico 3770 

llOO watt AM/FM receiver 

Pynaco SCA-80 

1 46 erett RMS Jatefrettw! stereo emel. 

Scott 

I AM/fM stereo "SCOTTII" receiver, do 



SPEAKER SYSTEMS 





© ia© 

:©9 gj 






Fisher XP-55 

«-%»•* sy stem t> woofer, 3 tweeter 



REG. SALE 

$49.9$ *29 95 



Fisher XP-56 *-,ooe SOOos 

Oeleie S-wev tysteai 0" woofer, I" tweeter W?.V5 O Tf^ 

Fisher XP-65/104 ».«•, . r . * loq 91 $CQ9S 

10" weefer. 5" *.ier.. 3 " twttt.r, fr. Brill >IUV.Y> T j7 

Fisher XP-66C 0,1 j.»„ mt. eiofl ae $7095 

11" woofer, S%"ewdr., 3" tweeter, let. trill $129.95 "*W 

Dynaco A-25 *,««* S^>I95 

1 we T "APHWOK" iyt 10" wee».r, 1 " fwteftr $79.95 *©-0 

^ $iit.ti $ 89 9S 



Pioneer CS-66 

dVway iy%> ler woofer, mcrenoe twee ft 

Pioneer CSE-50O 

NM OM It" »>way teeafcer tysteai 

Pioneer CS-63DX 

IS** 4-way syttewi. Fretwork frill 

KLH-23 

3*woy 1J - * soeoker tyiteei fCesOMO tfe)cej 

Electro-Voice EV-1 1 

J-wey 4" rrsteoi 



$149.93 $ 114* S 
$269.9$ *229 9S 

$159.9$ *89 9S 

$39.9$ $ 14 fS 

Lafayette Criterion 77 ..- ac $OA9s 

S-wey lyvteei win. I" weehr Vt/.YS WA 

Lafayette LR6X *,„ 9 « $AA°s 

Sway ns. wife ir woofer fall site ? ■ *Y.Y» W-O 

— * ■■ , , ..ee,ny>*„ $74.9$ $ 54** 

Lafayette Criterion 5XA*, M ._ $0095 

Steeeker.ir-n.ta. $129.95 ? OV 



RECORD CHANGERS 
& TURNTABLES 





REG. 



SALE 



Garrard 40B 

evteawtic record cbeaaer 



Garrard SL95B 

eet ease tic fe rotable 



Garrard Zero 100 

s*eieso tvrvTODie 



BSR 31 OX 

eele. terateble with base, cover. Share i 



$$4.9$ 



BSR610X €000 . 

eete. fere., sewer bass, cover. S hore el is. cart. ?"'•»' 



BSR 4800 *, a . 

ceotp. rsc. cheat, with sets, cover, cerotalc sort. >J Y.T3 



Dual CS-16 

del. terefebls with bete, cover, .He. cart. 



Garrard SL-55B 

ssteaetic foretells 



TAPE DECKS 
AND RECORDERS 




REG. 



SALE 



Fisher RC-80B 

"DOW sHree ceiMtts fops decb 



Sony TC-160 

dolose stereo cassette fuse decb 



Panasonic CX-8 11 

S-trscb eete. stereo ton player, H van 



Teac 1230 

delete reel-to- reel tterso fops decb 



Teac 1250 



$249.9$ W 



$219.9$ $ 179 M 

$99.9$ $ 79 M 

$399.9$ $ 359 50 



■vtee.sti. rs».r,l^ rseMe-rsel .tsrso fops decb $499.$0 *459*° 

Sony CF610 am^m .toreo roc. eoQOOC $OAO'* 
with ceustfs recorder, aiupl. speeksrs. >2V9.95 ^Jt-#TF 



Teac A-23 

stereo cassette tope deck 



Teac A24 

delex* stereo ceissfte tops decb 



Panasonic RS820S 

S-tr. rs c srdor, AM/TM rosshror, teeeber 



Sony 366 

• beaddeteis 



root* i^p* r eel eo»a 



$139.9$ *99 fi 



$179.9$ *139 fi 

$299.9$ *269 fS 
$269.9$ *239 f * 



RECORDING TAPE 




Scotch 



cojjreTTe 
BE3E3§fS 



REG. 



Sony SLH-180 
Memorex C-60 
Memorex C-90 
Dynosound 8T-80 
Scotch C-30 
Scotch C-60 High En. 
Scotch C-90 High En. 
Scotch C-30 High En. 
Scotch 190-14-1800 

STEREO HEADPHONES 




Pioneer SE-50 
Pioneer SE-30 
Pioneer SE-20 
Lafayette 00-0007W 

"The Heedset" 

Superex ST-PROB 
Superex STC 



REG. SALE 

»m. $39" 

,34,5 $27" 
-24,5 M9 95 

mm *7* 5 
mm *29 9S 
mm *13 95 



COMPACT 
STEREO SYSTEMS 




BSR RT30 

AM/MM itsree tf steta 

Panasonic SC-666 

AM/rM stereo pkoes »> i tern 



Lafayette LRC70 

ISt watt AftVNa cotai. tyi- Isss n 



speakers 



Fisher 

AM/FM r.csWsr/pheee cstabiaatiea 

Panasonic SE-990 

AM/rM ■beee/eessette r ecor d er cetab. 

KLH26 

del vis pbees system 

KLH20/4X _ <Alk _ - _ 

AM/FM IM weft paeoe syitsai (Albosr stsrs) 



REG. SALE 

$269.9$ *169" 

$299.9$ *229 fi 

$2$9.9$ ^189 f * 

$299.9$ »249 f * 

$249.9$ M79 fi 

$269.9$ •229 ti 

$399.9$ *249 W 




MAGNETIC 
CARTRIDGES 



"v 




Shore M7/N21D 

Shore V15 Type II 

Shore M55E 

Shore M93E 

Pickering XV15-200E 

Pickering XV15-400E 

jPickering XV15-750E 
[Pickering PAC 



RE6. SAU 

S,7.,5 *9»S 

*«. 50 M9 95 

mm M4 95 
mm M9 W 

smi ^24 9S 
w.»s *29 95 

mm *9 95 



4 CHANNEL 
STEREO EQUIPMENT 



*!2^P>. 



Pioneer QX-8000 

240 watt receivsr 4-chaaael 



Electro-Voice EVX4 




REG. SALE 

$$49.9$ *449 f * 

$49.9$ *29 # * 



JS&CSr 9 Dyn ° Quad $29.9$ M9 f- 



Laf ayette LRK-480 

IM/FM recsivor, • aoad S-tr. tafe pley t r 



Lafayette LR-440 

200 watt AM/FM 4-chea. stereo receiver 



Fi;her601 

SOS watt AM/FM 4-chaaael receiver 



Fisher CP- 100 

4 41 cheaasf oaed, S-trach tape dscb 



Lafayette SQM 

i 4-CfvOAOw'I »0 ■ooMlsr 



$179.9$ $ 129 fi 

$369.9$ *329 fi 

$$99.9$ $ 499 f * 

$169.9$ $89" 

$44.9$ $37" 



MISCELLANEOUS 
All CB Equipment 

10% off 

Color TV's 

Radios 

Cassette Recorders 

AT GREAT BUYS 

TV antenna systems 

10% off 



LAFAYETTE 

OWNED AND OPERATED 

SEIDEN SOUND 



AMHERST 



STORE HOURS 
10 A.M. - 9 P.M. THURS. & FRI. 

10 A.M. - 6 P.M. MON., TUES., WED., SAT 

549-1105 



OTHER STORES 

PITTSFIELD, MASS. 

COLONIE, N.Y. 

ALBANY, N.Y. 

SCHENECTADY, N.Y 

GLEN FALLS, N.Y. 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



Rep. Simons Announces Bid 
For Franklin Co. Re-election 



Summer Intramurals 
To Start Today 



Representative Thomas G. 
Simons (R— Montague) announced 
his candidacy for re-election to the 
Massachusetts House of 
Representatives from the Third 
Franklin District. 

"In these complicated times, it is 
essential that this district have a 
qualified, dedicated and honest 
voice in Boston, a voice not subject 
to any special interest", Simons 
stated. 

"The Massachusetts Legislature 
is a place for people who un- 
derstand what makes government 
work, for people who want to get 
things done. It is a place where 
reason is important and where 
results are what count most. I feel 
that my efforts during the last two 
years on behalf of all of the people 
of my district indicate my 
seriousness of purpose in seeing 
that the interests of my area are 
protected and supported by 
vigorous and effective leadership. 
My experience will enable me in 
the future to serve the needs of the 
Third Franklin District with even 
greater competence and ef- 




ficiency." 

Representative Simons is 
currently a member of the joint 
legislative committee on State 
Administration and the joint 
legislative committee on Election 
Laws. In addition, he serves on a 
Special Commission on the Con- 
necticut River Basin and is a 



UMass Receives $88, 000 Grant 



WASHINGTON D.C. 

Congressman Silvio O. Conte (R- 
Mass) and Senator Edward W. 
Brooke ( R-Mass ) tcday announced 
the award of more than $88,000 in 
research grants to the UMass- 
Amherst from the National Science 
Foundation. 

Dr. Robert B. Hallock of the 
Physics and Astronomy Depart- 
ment has received $33,300 to 



conduct a two year study on 
"Quantized Vortex Rings, The A.C. 
Josephson Effect, and other 
Orifice-flow Phenomena in HE II." 
Dr. Claude M. Penchina also of the 
Physics and Astronomy Depart- 
ment will study "Optical 
Properties of Semiconductors and 
Insulators in Electric Fields" for 
two years with a $55,300 NSF 
research grant. 



(Continued from Page 8) 



Springfield 

BASKETBALL HALL OF FAME (Off 
Interstate 91 on Rte. 21 exit, follow 
signs on No. 21 ( Sumner Ave. ) to first 
left after stop light at White St.). 
Museum showing chronological 
history of the game, development of 
equipment, etc.; plaques of greats, 
photographs, shrine. Admission 
charge. Open Sept. June, daily, 10 5; 
Sun., 15. July Aug., only, 10 5. Closed 
New Year's, Thanksgiving, 
Christmas. 

FTC Stops 
Schools 

(Continued from Page 3) 

created to further the discipline of 
guidance counselors and 
professional counselling methods, 
research and techniques. This 
respondent charges prospective 
members annual dues by 
representing that APO is a bona 
fide organization of guidance 
counselors and that one of its 
principal programs is the main- 
tenance of a home for homeless 
boys. The hearing examiner found 
the respondent did not meet even a 
reasonable criteria for a 
professional society. The home for 
boys was generally the house used 
as a personal residence of one of 
the individual respondents and the 
presence of boys was sporadic, in 
some cases no more than visits of 
sons of friends." 



South Hadley 

SKINNER MUSEUM (one third mile 
north of So. Hadley center on Rte. 
116, 35 Woodbridge St.). Objects of 
local historical interest, New 
England antiques, pewter, glass, 
collection of N.E. birds. Open May 1 
Nov.l; Sun. and Wed., 2-5. (534-5923) 
Springfield 

ALEXANDER HOUSE (on Rte. 20, 
284 State St.). Linden Hall, built 1811 
from designs by Asher Benjamin. 
Open weekdays by appt. Call or write 
Society for the Preservation of New 
England Antiquities, 141 Cambridge 
St., Boston, Mass. 02114. (617 227 
3956). 

INTERNATIONAL DRUM AND 
BUGLE CORPS COMPETITION 

(Aug. 19, 7:30, at UMass Alumni 
Stadium). 

In event of rain, held following day 
at 1:30 in Curry Hicks Cage, UMass. 
Seating on first come basis. Tickets 
at door if not reserved. To reserve, 
call 549 0777. Sponsored by 
Belchertown State School Friends 
Assn. to benefit the school. 

Featured events. Host: National 
Eagles Junior Drum Corps of 
Easthampton; The Skyliners from 
NY. City; Les Diplomates 
Quebec City, Canada; 
Renegades, Everett; The 
manders, Ontario, Canada 
Sunrisers, Hempstead, L.I. Special 
exhibitions: St. George Olympians 
Junior Drum and Bugle Corps from 
Springfield ; massed colors composed 
of VFW and American Legion color 
guards. 



from 
The 

Com 
The 



participant in a special task force 
to study the water resources and 
needs of the Commonwealth. He is 
also an active member of the 
D.U.M.P. Committee concernea 
with the proposed Montague Plains 
solid waste disposal facility and 
the Orange Citizens Review Board 
which is responding to the plan to 
divert water from the Millers 
River and the Tully River into the 
Quabbin Reservoir. 

Last year, Representative 
Simons was instrumental in for- 
cing the Secretary of State of 
Massachusetts to comply with 
state law and publish all ad- 
ministrative rules and regulations. 

Representative Simons has been 
particularly active in the solid 
waste field, has traveled to 
Franklin, Ohio with area citizens to 
investigate a recycling facility, 
filed numerous bills to improve 
and clarify existing state law, and 
is currently undertaking an in 
depth study of the feasibility of 
both voluntary and commercial 
recycling in Massachusetts. 



Crier Classifieds 



WANTKDTORKNT 



(•r.iduatr couple and baby coming to 
I M.iss in fall, looking for couplets) and/ 
or i.miil> ii-v > (or communal living. 
Contact Frank and Carol i.ravitt. Apt 118, 
!«i West North Collrgr Street. Yellow 
Springs. Ohio 4S387. 515-767-7133. 



FOR SAL K 



I'sed bicycle* inexpensive. Come to 427 
V I'lcasant. Apt. 105. 



Stereo — hi II Model 20. Excellent 
I condition. H track tape deck included. 1200. 
(all 250-K5II 



MM < he\ rolet Impala Convertible, good 
I condition, contact Larry at 549-AR76 or 
leave message at Crier Office. 



KOKKKNT 



lwi> bdrm apis for immediate rental. 
II*. in., incl ul lilt irs Call Resident Mgr 
IKfi.VIL'.M. if no answer I-7HB-4I.VHI 



FOR SALE — Sylvania portable| 
TV. like new. V.H.F. & U.H.F. 
Best offer around S30. 427 North| 
Pleasant St., University Apart 
ments, Number 105. 

To ALL Students, Faculty, etc:[ 

You are invited to meet each| 
Tuesday at 6:45 PM for an in- 
formal Christian Science Collegel 
Organization testimonial meeting. | 
Call: Rob Yacubian, 65 No. 
Propsect St., Amherst Center, 256 | 
8740. 

FREE Monthly Bargain Price Listl 
of Coins for the investor, beginner! 
or advanced collector. GOLDENl 
HEDGE, P.O. Box 207 T, Gracie| 
Station, NYC 10028 



The Intramural Activities 
Department is happy to announce 
that they will conduct a Summer 
Intramural Sports Program 
commencing on June 26. Organized 
sports will include Softball, 
volleyball, tennis, badminton, 
horseshoes, a bicycle race and a 
swimming meet for both men and 
women. Squash, handball and 
paddleball competition will be 
offered for men only. For general 
Recreational Activity, the Boyden 
swimming pool, handball/squash 
courts, bowling alleys, gymnasium 
and Weight Training Room will be 
available at specified hours. 

The Intramural Department will 
administer a three part program 
consisting of Competitive Sports 
Activities, Co-ed Recreational 
Sports Activities and Open Play. 

The Competitive Sports Ac- 
tivities Program will include a 
variety of team and individual 
sports for men and women 
separately. The Braves & Squaws 
Co-ed Recreational Program will 
consist of team and dual sports for 
men and women competing 
together. The Open Play Program 
will avail all recreational sports 
facilities for use when not other- 
wise scheduled, for those students 
who prefer informal leisurely 
workouts on their own, or a 



relaxing dip in the pool. 

Last year the 2,000 students, 
faculty and staff who actively 
participated found the program to 
be a rewarding experience 
physically, mentally and socially. 

Information concerning each 
specific activity will be distributed 
at Registration and is available at 
residence halls, as well as the 
Intramural Office, 215 Boyden 
Building. Messrs. Jack Berryman 
and Al Morris will conduct the 
men's program and Miss Gerry 
Klimovitch will be in charge of the 
women's program. They may be 
contacted at the Intramural Office 
to answer any questions. The 
telephone numbers are 545-2801 
and 545-2693 and office hours are 
9:00 AM to 9:00 PM Monday 
through Friday. 



Library Director Named 



Merle N. Boylan, University 
Librarian at UMass Amherst since 
1970, has been named to the 
combined position of Director of 
Libraries and University 
Librarian, by Dr. Robert L. 
Gluckstem, Vice-Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs. 

In this new position, Mr. Boylan 
will administer UMass library 
policy as well as direct the 
operations of all libraries on 
campus. 

As University Librarian, Mr. 
Boylan has implemented major 
library computer applications 
which have greatly reduced 
processing time and costs, 
initiated the centralized processing 
center for the 28 state institutions 
of higher education, and has been 
responsible for the final stages of 
planning on the new 28-story, 2-1/2 
million-volume University Library 
which will be occupied late this 
fall. 

A graduate of Youngstown 
University, he received his 



master's degree in library science 
from the Carnegie-Mellon 
University. In 1964 he became 
library manager at the Lawrence 
Radiation Laboratory at the 
University of California at 
Livermore, where he had been 
assistant librarian for technical 
services from 1962. He joined the 
UMass library as associate 
director for technical services in 
1969. 



The PLACE THAT MADE 
AMHERST FAMOUS 
DRAKE RESTAURANT 



Village Inn 



RATHSKELLAR 
85 AMITY 253-2548 



25,000 
Used Books 

(all categories) 

for the scholarly 
& undergraduates 

HADLEY 
BOOK SHOP 

204 Russell St. 
(Route 9; 
HADLEY, MASS. 01035 

Used books 

bought & sold 

586-2663 




THE MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE 
SUMMER THEATRE 

South Hadley, Mass. 
proudly presents 
THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS 

Tues-Sat June 27-31 10:30 AM 

and 

YOU'RE A GOOD MAN CHARLIE BROWN 

Tues.-Sat. July 4-8 8:30 p.m. 
FREE PARTY AFTER SHOW JULY 4th 
BOX OFFICE open 10AM-9PM Daily Except Sunday 

Phone 538-2406 for ticket information 



Join The Sensuous 
Summer Staff 



This is an offer you can t refuse i 



! 



News Staff: Tonight at the Crier's Office 
Student Activities Area 
First Level Campus Center 



Photographers: Tuesday at the Collegian Darkroom 

2nd Floor Student Union 



If You Are Arrested-Part I 



WHAT IS AN ARREST? 

You are "arrested" when law 
enforcement officials or private 
persons take you into custody or 
otherwise deprive you of your 
freedom of action in order to hold 
you to answer for a criminal of- 
fense. 



MAY YOU BE STOPPED 
WITHOUT BEING ARRESTED? 

At any time an officer may ask to 
see your identification or to 
question you briefly without 
arresting you. 

If an officer has reason to believe 
that you are carrying a concealed 



Crossword Puzzle 

ACROSS 



1 


Everyone 


4 


Pronoun 


6 


Bog down 


11 


Dried grape 


13 


Expert 


15 Symbol for 




silver 


16 


Involves 


18 


Spanish for 




"yes" 


19 


King of 




Bashan 


21 


Amount owed 


22 


Direction 


24 Classify 


26 


Soaks 


28 


Bishopric 


29 Vegetable 


31 


Part of 




camera 


33 


Rupees (abbr.) 


34 


Malay canoe 


36 


Not one 


38 


Compass point 


40 


Girl's name 


42 


Yelps 


45 


Cravat 


47 


Cut 


49 


Liquid 




measure 


50 


One opposed 


52 


Southwestern 




Indians 


54 Symbol for 




cerium 


55 


Pronoun 


56 


Radical 


59 Teutonic deity 


61 


Amend 


63 


A halo 


65 Paper 




measure (pi.) 


M 


» French article 


67 


Worm" - 



4 Intellect 

5 Go in 

6 Struck 

7 Hindu cymbals 

8 The caama 

9 Army officer 
(abbr.) 
Smaller 
Compass point 
Ceremonies 
Son of Adam 
Grasp 
Conjunction 

24 Conjunction 

25 Ripped 
Supercilious 
person 
Bows 
Break 
suddenly 
Yearly 
publications 
Man's name 
Step 
Season 
River islands 



10 
12 
14 
17 
20 
23 



27 

30 
32 

35 





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37 
38 
39 
41 



43 Rests on the 
knees 

44 Thoroughfare 
(abbr.) 

46 Latin 

conjunction 
48 Part of 

flower 

Mental image 



53 
57 
58 

60 

62 
64 



U 

Father 
Male sheep 
Symbol for 
cerium 
Ethiopian 
title 

Hebrew letter 
Faroe Islands 
whirlwind 

T 



DOWN 




weapon and are dangerous to him 
or to others, he may conduct a 
limited search or "frisk" by 
patting down your outer clothing. 
If this "frisk" reveals what feels 
like a weapon, he may search for 
an remove the object he feels. The 
officer must return any object he 
finds unless he places you under 
arrest. 

If you are stopped and frisked, 
the search is limited. The officer 
may ask you some questions, 
however you have a constitutional 
right not to answer them. Usually 
it is advisable to give your name 
and address. 

At the conclusion of the stop and 
frisk and when the conversation 
has terminated, the officer must 
either arrest you or let you go. He 
must return all property to you if 
he does not arrest you. 



WHEN MAY YOU BE 
ARRESTED? 

An officer may arrest you any 
time he has a war/ant for your 
arrest. A warrant is an order 
issued by a court charging that you 
committed a crime and directing a 
policeman to arrest you and to 
bring you before the court. An 
arrest warrant is different from a 
search warrant. 



An officer may arrest you 
WITHOUT a warrant in certain 
situations: 



WHEN he knows that a warrant 
for your arrest has been issued and 
is still in effect. 

WHEN he has reason to believe 
that you committed a felony. A 
felony is one of the more serious 
crimes such as murder, robbery, 
rape, possession of narcotics, theft 
in excess of $100, or receiving 
stolen goods in an amount ex- 
ceeding $100. 



WHEN you commit a breach of 
the peace in his presence. A breach 
of the peace is any kind of public 
disturbance. 



WHEN certain special statutory 
arrest rules apply. 

You resist at your own peril the 
policeman who is doing his job. 
Even if you arc innocent, it may be 
advisable not to fight or struggle. A 
policeman may use all force 
necessary to arrest you or keep you 
under arrest. 



only with your permission or with a 
search warrant or incidental to 
your arrest. A search warrant is a 
court order authorizing him to 
examine a certain area. 



The search must be to the area 
described in the warrant. You may 
ask to see the warrant or the of- 
ficer may read it to you. It is a 
court paper and he may retain 



custody of it. The affadavit listing 
the reasons or the search warrant 
is retained in Massachusetts by the 
court which issued the warrant and 
to which the warrant is returned. 



Read carefully any consent form 
you are asked to sign to see if it 
conforms to your understanding of 
what you are agreeing or con- 
senting to let the officer search. 



WHEN MAY YOU BE SEAR- 
CHED? 

There are specific rules 
regarding searches of your person, 
your home, and your car. 
Generally, a police officer may 
search your person, home, or car 



Master Calendar- 



June 26 - Summer Session Registration. 

June 27 - Summer Session classes begin. 

June 28 - Board of Trustees Meeting, Waltham. 

July 1 - Annual Reports of Deans due in Chancellor's Office (1971- 

72). 

Aug. 18 - Last day for changes in Fall, 1972 course offerings and 

schedule material. 




1 



Astro-Cast 

Aries goes directly to source. Red tape 
and Aries do not go together These 
persons often appear domineering. In 
reality, they want forthright answers and 
are natural enemies of bureaucracy 
Aries can be headstrong, affectionate and 
can be extremely loyal to loved ones 
Aries is impatient. But Aries often knows 
answers before the questions are asked. 
Aries does not pretend. However, Aries 
can arrange situations which work out in 
surprising manner. Some famous persons 
born under this dynamic zodiacal sign 
include Bette Davis, Harry Reasoner and 
Hugh Hefner. 



ARIES (March 21 -April 19): Conditions 
are better than they appear on surface. 
Bide your time. Bv analytical. One who 
has been making promises now makes 
confession Alter plans. One in authority 
is on your side. Ultimate gain is in 
dicated. 

TAURUS (April 20 May 20): Fulfill 
obligations Deal with Capricorn. Review 
basic issues. Good news received from 
one who is at a distance. Catch up on 
correspondence. Money deal is in offing. 
Show willingness to handle added 
responsibility. 

GEMINI (May 2T June 20) : Don't hang 
on to losing 'proposition. Be creative 
enough to develop new plan, format 
Aries individual could play key role. 
Youngster who makes demands merely is 
crying for attention. Respond ac 
cordingly. 

CANCER (June 21 July 22): Conditions 
at home are subiect to abrupt change 
Take independent stance. But realize 
some family members are intent on being 
contrary. State your case, but leave room 
for others to save face. 

LEO (July 23 Aug. 22): Trust hunch 
regarding proposed journey. Relative 
who means well may also be misin 
formed. Check directions, times and 
reservations. Don't expect too much from 
promises. Key now is self reliance. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23 Sept 22): Stress 
versatility. Realize former ways of 
earning could now be subject to revision. 
People on the go want you to join. 
Socialize. Listen. Let out reins on in 
tellectual curiosity But don't rush >to 
judgment 

LIBRA (Sept 23 Oct. 22): Hold off on 
long range investments. What appears to 
be a gold mine of the future may be much 
less. Specl'ically. property land sales 
need more examination. Check details; 
study fine print. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 Nov. 21): Good 
neighbor, relative who is wise these are 
featured. Be willing to listen. What you 
fear is of a temporary nature. Don't make 
more of a situation than it deserves. 
Gemini and Virgo are in picture. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 Dec. 21): You 
may take step backward, but you also 
advance. Taurus and Libra friends are in 
picture. There are disputes, but also some 
marvelous reconciliations. Emotions fly 
up and down -but you do find happiness. 
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 Jan. 19): Obtain 
hint from Sagittarius message. Don't rely 
too heavily on first impressions. Give 
yourself time to think, analyze and 
evaluate. Accent is on expansion, 
professional advancement, attaining of 
personal goals. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 Feb. 18): Friend 
who has been "hiding" comes into open. 
Long journey, written material these are 
spotlighted. Take conservative course. 
Apply past lessons Heed voice of ex 
perience. Co operate with Capricorn. 

PISCES (Feb. 19 March 20): Finish 
rather than initiate proiects. Get rid of 
burden not rightly your own. Deal with 
Aries. Get financial matters straight. One 
who makes many promises should be 
"called." Means ask for put up or shut 
up deal. 

IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY, 
November will be one of your most 
significant months of 1972. You are 
bogged down now with details, concerned 
with domestic area and arc spending 
money on home improvements You will 
be dealing extensively with Taurus, Libra 
individuals. 



Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



Western New 



The movies, plays, dance ancf 
theatre events listed in this sup 
plement are subject to change and 
additions. For up-to-the minute 
details see the Crier. 

Plays and Musicals 

AMHERST COLLEGE (Amherst) 
For tickets and information, 542,2277. 

THE THREEPENNY OPERA by 
Bertolt Brechtand Kurt Weill; Sept. 
8, 9, 10, 11; curtain time 8:30; Sun. 
matinee at 3. Kirby Theatre. 
ARENA CIVIC THEATRE 

(Greenfield) 
For tickets and information, 773-7991. 

PLAZA SUITE by Neil Simon, June 
22, 23, 24, 29, 30; July 1. 

THE BOY FRIEND by Sandy 
Wilson; July 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15. 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY WANDA 
JUNE by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.; July 20, 
21, 22, 27, 28, 29. 

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING 
EARNEST by Oscar Wilde; Aug. 3,4, 

5, 10, 11, 12. 

A MEMORY OF TWO MONDAYS 
by Arthur Miller and BEA, FRANK, 
RICHIE AND JOAN from "Lovers 
and Other Strangers" by Joseph 
Bologna and Renee Taylor; Aug. 17, 
18, 19, 24, 25, 26. 

COMMUNITY MUSICAL '72 
(Amherst) 

For tickets and information contact 
Amherst Regional Junior High 
School. 

WINNIE THE POOH; July 28, 29; 
Junior High School. 

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN; Aug, 
4, 5; Junior High School. 

ANYTHING GOES; Aug. 11, 12, 13, 
18, 19. High School. 
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE (So. 
Hadley) 
For tickets and information, 538-2406. 

THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS; 
(Children's production in the 
Amphitheatre, 10:30 a.m.) June 27, 
28, 29, 30; July 1. 

YOU'RE A GOOD MAN CHARLIE 
BROWN by Clark Gesner; July 4, 5, 

6, 7, 8. Curtain time 8:30. 
PRIVATE LIVES by Noel Coward; 

July 11, 12, 13, 14, 15; curtain time 
8:30. 

ANY WEDNESDAY by Muriel 
Resnick; July 18, 19, 20, 21, 22; 
curtain time 8:30. 

SEE HOW THEY RUN by Philip 
King; July 25, 26, 27, 28, 29; curtain 
time 8:30. 

LUV by Murray Schisgal; Aug. 1, 2, 
3, 4, 5; curtain time 8:30. 

ARMS AND THE MAN by George 
Bernard Shaw; Aug. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; 
curtain time 8:30. 

YOU'RE A GOOD MAN CHARLIE 
BROWN; (Children's production in 
the Amphitheatre, 10:30 a.m.) Aug. 
15, 16, 17, 18, 19. 

MUSICAL THEATRE PRODUC- 
TION ASSOC. (Chicopee) 
For tickets and information, 532-2332. 

LI'L ABNER by Johnny Mercer 
and Gene de Paul; Aug. 18, 19, 25, 26. 
in Edward Bellamy Middle School. 
PORTABLE CIRCUS: COMEDY IN 
CONCERT (at UMass, Campus 
Center Aud., faculty and students 
seated first). 

THE PORTABLE CIRCUS, Aug. 9, 
8 p.m. Formed in 1969 at Trinity 
College, Hartford, Conn., a group of 
five performers who, through a 
series of lively comedy sketches, 
examines the effects that television, 
the universal medium, has on us all. 
No props, costumes or sets. Light 
comedy combined with biting satire. 
("Anyone who can get belly laughs 
out of Vassar girls has to be fan- 
tastic," Marion Fox, Vassar 
College.) 

SPRINGFIELD FREE THEATRE 
(Forest Park) 
For information, 596-6490. 

LYSISTRATA by Aristophanes; 
July 7, 8, 14, 15; curtain time 8:30. 

A FESTIVAL OF NEW 

AMERICAN PLAYS; July 28, 29; 
Aug. 4, 5~; curtain time 8:30. 

THE TAAAING OF THE SHREW by 
William Shakespeare; Aug. 25, 26; 
Sept. 1, 2; curtain time 8:30. 
STORROWTON MUSICAL 
THEATRE (West Springfield) 
For tickets and information, 732-1105. 
THE ROTHSCHILDS, runs the 
week of June 19. 

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR, 
runs the week of June 26. 

LAST OF THE RED HOT 
LOVERS, runs the week of July 3. 

COMPANY, runs the week of July 
10. 

THIS WAS BURLESQUE, runs the 
week of July 17. 

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF, runs 
the week of July 24. 

MAME, runs the week of July 31. 

THE AL MART I NO SHOW, runs 
the w** 

uns the 



week of Aug. 14. 

1776, runs the week of Aug. 21. 

MAN OF LA MANCHA, runs the 
week of Aug. 28. 

UNIVERSITY OF 

MASSACHUSETTS (Amherst) 
For tickets and information, 545-2579. 

LOVE, MARRIAGE, ETC., plays 
by Jules Feiffer, Anton Chekhov, and 
Hey wood; Studio Theatre, South 
College; July 27, 28, 29; Aug. 3, 4, 5; 
curtain time 8:30. 

THE GLASS MENAGERIE by 
Tennessee Williams; Bartlett Aud.; 
Aug. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13; curtain time 
8:30. 

The University also has plans for 
several children's shows during the 
summer. 

WILLIAMSTOWN SUMMER 
THEATRE (Williamstown) 
For tickets and information, 458-8146. 

MARY STUART by Friedrich 
Schiller; June 29-July 8. 

LAST OF THE RED HOT LOVERS 
by Neil Simon; July 11-15. 

ARTURO Ul by Bertolt Brecht; 
July 18-22. 

ONCE IN A LIFETIME by 
Kaufman and Hart; July 25-29. 

UNCLE VANYA by Anton 
Chekhov; Aug. 1-5. 

THE COUNTRY GIRL by Clifford 
Odets; Aug. 8-12. 

PROBABLY REPEAT OF MOST 
POPULAR PLAY; Aug. 15-19. 

AN UNANNOUNCED MUSICAL; 

Aug 22 26 13^^ 

JACOB'S PILLOW DANCE 

FESTIVAL (in Becket, take Mass. 
Pike to Lee-Pittsfield exit, turn on 
U.S. Rte. 20 toward Springfield. 
Eight miles to George Carter Rd., 
turn left seven-tenths mile). 

Tickets at box office; to ensure 
reservations, however, order in 
advance. (243-0745) All matinees 
begin promptly at 8:40. No seating 
while curtain is up. Programs sub- 
ject to change without notice. Except 
for June 22-24, perforamances each 
week are: Tues. eve., Wed. eve., 
Thurs. matinee, Fri. eve., Sat. mat. 
and eve. 

JUNE 22 24: Thurs. mat., Fri. 
eve,. Sat. mat., eve. Marion Rice's 
Denishawn Dancers with Guest 
Artist Carolyn Brown; Barton 
Mumaw. 

JUNE 27-JULY 1: Dayton Ballet 
Company (artistic dir., Josephine 
Schwarz)' Morse Donaldson Dance 
Co. 

JULY 4 8: Matteo and the Indo 
American Dance Co.; Claude Kipnis 
Mime Theatre (selections from "Men 
and Dreams"). 

JULY 11-15: Afro-American Dance 
Ensemble (artistic dir., Arthur 
Hall); Carmen De Lava l lade. 

JULY 18-22: First Chamber Dance 
Co.: Frank Bays, Charles Bennett, 
Sara De Luis, Janice Groman, 
Flemming Halby, Carolyn Muchmor, 
Marjorie Mussman, Gerard Sibbritt. 

JULY 25 29: Minnesota Dance 
Theatre (artistic dir., Loyce 
Houlton). 

AUG. 1-5: The Boston Ballet Co. 
(artistic dir., E. Virginia Williams). 

AUG. 8-12: Maria Alba Spanish 
Dance Co. (Spanish and Flamenco 
repertoire with singer and guitarist). 

AUG. 15-19: Luis Rivera Spanish 
Dance Co.; Takado Asakawa and 
David Hatch Walker. 

AUG. 22-26: Ethnic Dance Arts Co. 
(artistic dir. Mme. La Meri) with 
Guest Artist Nala Najan; Jacob's 
Pillow Dancers (choreography by 
Manolo Vargas). 

UMASS SUMMER DANCE 

PROGRAM (in Bowker Aud., 8 p.m.; 
students seated first). 

JULY 20: The Chuck Davis Dance 
Co. Group of young professional 
dancers and musicians with training 
and experience in the classical, 
ethnic, jazz and modern idioms. The 
presentation is "a unique repertoire, 
and includes ethnic and modern 
dance, spanning the black man's 
heritage from the early cultures of 
Africa to the modern culture." 

Movies 

UMASS SUMMER FILM PROGRAM 
(in Campus Center Aud. unless 
otherwise indicated; students seated 
first). 

JUNE 27: I Love You Alice B. 
Toklas at 7. Anatomy of a Murder at 
9. 

JULY 4: Requiem for 8 
Heavyweight at 7. The Cardinal at 9. 
JULY 11: One Potato Two Potato 
at 7. A Raisin in the Sun at 9. 

JULY 12: Film Festival and 
Feature, from 1:30 to 5. 

JULY 18: The Birds at 7. Whatever 
Happened to Baby Jane at 9. 

JULY 25: All the King's Men at 7. 
The Caine Mutiny at 9. In Student 




Is Alive! 



Union Ballroom. 

AUG. 2: On the Waterfront at 7. 
Guns of Havarone at 9. 

AUG. 8: A Walk in the Spring Rain 
at 7. Baby the Rain Must Fall at 9. 

AUG. 15: Splendor in the Grass at 
7. Ship of Fools at 9. 



Lectures 



EXPLORING PSYCHIC 
PHENOMENA AND 

SPIRITUALITY and PERSONAL 
PSYCHIC AND SPIRITUAL 
DEVELOPMENT (in Wright Hall 
Lounge, Smith College, Nor- 
thampton). 

Lectures each Mon. and Wed. at 7 
p.m. Areas delved into include ESP, 
hypnotism, graphology, tran- 
scendental meditation (on June 28) 
yoga, and the like. On July 12 Arthur 
Savoy, psychic, mentalist, lecturer 
and demonstrator of hypnosis, 
psychic phenomena, and ex- 
trasensory perception will give a 
lecture-demonstration. For week-to- 
week programs call Walker Thomas, 
Ashfield, 628-3278. 

HUMOR OF GAHAN WILSON (June 
28, 8 p.m., Campus Center Aud., 
UMass; students and faculty seated 
first). 

The "goulish, depraved, 

traumatic" cartoons of Wilson have 
appeared regularly in such 
publications as "Playboy", 
"Audobon," and "Fantasy and 
Science Fiction." His lecture, 
illustrated with slides of his work, is 
reputedly provocative and funny. 
Becoming more and more a political 
cartoonist because, according to 
Wilson, "the absurdities in the daily 
papers have made the horrors of the 
imagination small pickings." 

Music 

AMHERST FOLKLORE CENTRE 

(Spring St., just off Amherst com- 
mon). 

Open during July and Aug., Thurs. 
Sat., 8 p.m. to midnight. Folk, blues, 
rock music (live). Organic snacks. 
Admission for top performers. Come 
in anytime to audition. 
MOHAWK TRAIL CONCERT ASSN. 
(at The Federated Church, 
Charlemont, on Rte. 2, Mohawk 
Concerts at 8:30 p.m. Sat. Ad- 
mission charge. Refreshments, 
information and reservations, 625- 
2566 or 339-6674. Performers from all 
over N.E. and eastern N.Y. 

IULY 22: Haydn, Bach, Black, 
Hindemith. With Thomas Pyle, 
baritone. 

JULY 29: Schumann, Bartok, V. 
Williams, Brahms. 

AUG. 5: Handel, Crumb, Ravel. 
With N.Y. Camerata and Cynthia 
Healy, soprano. Local premiere of 
"Vox Balaenae" by George Crumb. 
AUG. 12: Three Worlds of 
American Music; Folk, Formal, 
Jazz. Charlemont Yankee Doodle 
Weekend. Featuring Marion Mc- 
Partland, jazz piano; Jay Loenhardt, 
bass; country musicians; a folk 
singer. 

AUG. 19: All Bach Program. With 
John and Gretchen d'Armand 
(UMass); Henry Schumann, oboe, 
Wedding Cantata and Coffee Can- 
tata. 

AUG. 26: Mozart, Shostakovich. 
Bernard Eichenbaum, violin; guest 
artists. 

SPECIAL EVENTS: Aug. 13 at 
3:30: Yankee Doodle Day Family 
Concert with Folksinger Leonda. 
Aug. 20 at 3:30: Folkmusic of the 
World. 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN ASSN. (So. 
Mountain Aud., Pittsfield). 

Programs on Sat. during July and 
Aug. and Sun. during Sept. All at 3 
p.m. For information write So. 
Mountain Concerts, Box 23, Pitt- 
sfield. 

JULY 15: Opera in contemporary 
style, "From Vienna to Broadway," 
presented by the Metropolitan Opera 
Studio. 

AUG. 12: Stanley Hummel, pianist, 
in recital of works by Mozart, Chopin, 
Prokofieff. 

AUG. 26: Orpheus Trio: Heidi Leh- 
walder, harp; Paula Robison, flute, 
Scott Nickrenz, viola. 

SEPT. 17: Rochester Chamber 
Soloists: Eugene List, Pianist and 
dir.; Carroll Glenn, violin; ensemble 
members. 

TANGLEWOOD (from Boston, Mass. 
Pike to exit 1 or 2 in Lenox). 

For tickets and information: 
Festival Ticket Office, Tanglewood, 
Lenox. (637 1600) WEEKEND 
PRELUDES are at 7 p.m. each Fri., 
two hours before the Boston Sym- 
phony concert; present guest artist 
and members of the Orchestra in 
short recitals offered at no extra 
charge to Fri. evening ticket holders. 



OPEN REHEARSALS are in the 
Shed each Sat. at 10:30a.m. to benefit 
Orchestra's Pension Fund; seats 
unreserved and available the mor- 
ning of the rehearsal. 

TANGLEWOOD TUESDAY. 
SPECIALS: JULY 4, 11, 18, 25: 
Popular Artist Series. AUG. 1: 
Boston Pops, with Arthur Fiedler 
conducting. AUG. 8: Festival on 
Contemporary Music. AUG. 15: 
Tang lewood-on- Parade with 
Berkshire Music Center concerts all 
afternoon; gala evening concert by 
combined Boston Symphony and 
Berkshire Music Center Orchestras, 
Michael Tilson Thomas conducting. 

Weekend Schedule 

JUNE 30: 7, Weekend Prelude with 
r estival Chorus. 9, Bach Program 
: Sei j i Ozawa conducting); Festival 
Chorus. 

JULY 1: 10:30 a.m., Open 
Rehearsal. 8:30, Bach, Beethoven 
Program (Stanislaw Skrowadzewski 
conducting); Claude Frank. 

JULY 2: 2:30. Haydn Program 
(Ozawa); Phyllis Curtin, Seth Mc- 
Coy, Robert Hale, Festival Chorus. 
JULY 7: 7, Weekend Prelude. 9, 
Mozart Program (Ozawa); Doriot 
Anthony Dwyer, Ann Hobson, 
Sherman Walt. 

JULY 8: 10:30 a.m. Open 
Rehearsal. 8:30, Gabrieli-Maderna, 
Earle Brown, Ives, Mozart Program 
(Bruno Maderna). 

JULY 9: 2:30, Haydn, Beethoven 

Program (Ozawa); Garrick Ohlsson. 

JULY 14: 7, Weekend Prelude. 9, 

Beethoven Program (William 

Steinberg). 

JULY 15: 10:30 a.m., Open 
Rehearsal. 8:30, Beethoven program 
(Steinberg); Jeannine Crader, 
Joanna Simon, Dean Wilder, Robert 
Hale, Festival Chorus. 

JULY 16: 2:30, Beethoven 
Program (Ozawa); Joseph Silver- 
stein, Jules Eskin, Peter Serkin, 
Festival Chorus. 

JULY 21: 7, Weekend Prelude. 9, 
Gabrieli, Stravinsky Program 
(Maderna); Earl Wild. 

JULY 22: 10:30 a.m., Open 
Rehearsal. 8:30, Brahms Program 
(Leonard Bernstein). 

JULY 23: 2:30, Gluck, 
Vejvanovsky, Schumann Program 
(Karel Ancerl); Alicia De Larrocha. 
JULY 28: 7, Weekend Prelude. 9, 
Brahms, Sibelius, Bartok Program 
(Eugene Ormandy). 

JULY 29: 10:30 a.m., Open 
Rehearsal. 8:30, Beethoven, Hin- 
demith, Strauss Program (Or- 
mandy). 

JULY 30: 2:30, Mozart Program 

(James Levine); Joseph Silverstein. 

AUG. 4: 7, Weekend Prelude. 9, 

Ruggles, Copland, Wuorinen, 

Stravinsky Program (Thomas). 

AUG. 5: 10:30 a.m., Open 
Rehearsal. 8:30, Mendelssohn, 
Prokofiev Program (Aldo Ceccato); 
John Browning. 

AUG. 6: 2:30, Haydn Program 
(Thomas); Ralph Gomberg. 

AUG. 11: 7, Weekend Prelude. 9, 
Wagner Program (Colin Davis) ; 
Jessye Norman, Festival Chorus. 

AUG. 12: 10:30 a.m., Open 
Rehearsal. 8:30, Berlioz, Beethoven 
Program (Davis); Gina Bachauer. 
AUG. 13: 2:30, Beethoven, Berlioz 
Program (Davis); Richard Lewis, 
Festival Chorus. 

AUG. 18: 7, Weekend Prelude. 9, 
Ligeti, Chopin Program (Ozawa); 
Alexis Weissenberg. 

AUG. 19: 10:30 a.m., Open 
Rehearsal. 8:30, Mozart, Brahms, 
Messiaen Program (Thomas) ; 
Misha Dichter. 

AUG. 20: 2:30, Mahler Program 
(Ozawa), Deborah O'Brien, Linda 
Phillips, Susan Clickner, Eunice 
Alberts, John Alexander, William 
Dooley, Saverio Barbieri, St. Paul's 
School Boy Choir, Theodore Marier, 
conductor, Festival Chorus, John 
Oliver, dir. 

UMASS SUMMER CONCERTS (on 
campus in places indicated below, 
students seated first). 

JULY6at8: Pianist Joshua R if kin, 
Bowker Aud. 

JULY 10 at 6:30: Mahavishnu 
Orchestra with John McLauglin, 
Metawampe Lawn (in case of rain. 
Student Union Ballroom). A mixture 
of jazz, rock and classical sound, 
using complicated progressions, odd 
time signatures and improvisation. 
Five-member group has played with 
the Grahm Band Organization, Brian 
Auger, and Miles Davis. 

JULY 13 at 8: Lutist and Guitarist 
Martin Best, lower gardens, adjacent 
to infirmary (in case of rain in 
Memorial Hall). Recreates ancient 
ballads, troubadour chansons, and 



Elizabethan airs. Also new music 
from traditional progressing through 
Elizabethan and court music of Spain 
and France to composers such as 
Stravinsky, Pieter Van der Staak, 
and his own pieces. 

JULY 27 at 8: Preservtion Hall 
Jazz Band, Goodell Library lawn (in 
case of rain, at 7 and 10 in Student 
Union Ballroom). Each member has 
memories of the days when jazz (or 
"jass" as it was spelled at the turn of 
the century) was taking form and 
shape and becoming a separate kind 
of music. New Orleans-based band 
includes Billie and De De Pierce, 
piano and trumpet; Josiah "Cie" 
Frazier, drums; "Big Jim" 
Robinson, trombone; Willie Hum- 
phrey, clarinet; Allan Jaffe, tuba. 

AUG. 1 at 6:30: Leo Kottke, Bill 
Staines, Mike Cataldo, Rock Quintet, 
Metawampe Lawn (in case of rain in 
Student Union Ballroom). Kottke 
uses the six string on selections 
ranging from Bach to McGuinn, as 
well as 12 string. Cataldo specializes 
in folk-rock. Staines has played at the 
Unicorn, Club 47, Mousehole 
(Toronto) and San Mountain 
(Houston). All acts will be solo. 

Special Events 

WHITE ROOTS OF PEACE: THE 
MOHAWK NATION AT AK 
WESASNE (at UMass on July 12). 

Exhibit and sale of Indian crafts, 
photographs, books, in Campus 
Center Music Room, 10 a.m. to 10 
p.m. 

Indian Films, in Campus Center 

ttfflL 1:30 5.. 
Ma eefing, Metawampe Lawn, 

8-10 p.m. (rain location, Campus 
Center Aud.). Indian prayer, dan- 
cing, singing, prophecy, reiigion, 
history, values, ecology, etc. 

Coffee Hour, Campus Center Music 
Room, 10 p.m. 

The White Roots of Peace group is 
located on the Mohawk Reserve at 
Akwesesne (St. Regis) on the St. 
Lawrence River. Audience par- 
ticipation in the activities is en- 
couraged. 

POETRY -OF THE LATIN WORLD 
AND THE CARIBBEAN (in Rm. 163, 
next to Campus Center Aud., UMass, 
at 8 p.m.). 

JULY 26: An evening of poetry 
presented by Vikki Ortiz (Medgar 
Evers College prof.), Robert 
Marquez (Hampshire College prof.), 
and Luisin Manuel Medina (student 
at UMass). Much of the poetry has 
been written and or translated by 
these artists of the Latin world and 
Caribbean. Will introduce the 
listeners! to the rhythms, lifestyles 
and values of Latin peoples; and 
moreover, the artists, through their 
poetry, bring political messages of 
international import. 
PIONEER VALLEY ASSN. 

EVENTS (at locations indicated 
below). For further information, call 
586 0321. (Ex. Fg. below means 
Exposition Fairgrounds in West 
Springfield). 

JULY 1-4: New England Arabian 
Horse Show at Ex. Fg. 

JULY 4: Lions Club Annual Car 
nival at Conant Park, Southampton. 

JULY 14-16: New England Ap 
paloosa Show at Ex. Fg. 

JULY 18: West Springfield Lions 
Club Circus at Ex. Fg. 

JULY 21-22: New England Sheep 
Sale at Ex. Fg. 

JULY 24-28: National Field Ar- 
chery Assn.'s 27th Annual Cham 
pionship at Ludlow Fish and Game 
Club. 

JULY 2630: Eastern National 
Morgan Horse Show at Tri-County 
Fairgrounds, Northampton. 

JULY 28-29: Hampden County 4-H 
Fair at Ex. Fg. 

AUG. 4-6: Focus: Outdoors. A 
nature study weekend sponsored by 
Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary and 
Mass. Audobon Society at Mt. 
Holyoke College, So. Hadley. 

AUG. 11-13: Middlefield Fair in 
Middlefield. 

AUG. 16-20: Black Harambee 
Holiday, Springfield. 

AUG. 18-20: Westfield Fair in 
Westfield. 

AUG. 21-22: Seaboard Standard 
Bred Horse Sale at Ex. Fg. 

AUG. 25-27: Cummington Fair 
in Cummington. 

AUG. 27 29: Massachusetts 4-H 
Fair at Ex. Fg. 

SEPT. 3-9: Tri-County Fair at Tri- 
County Fairgrounds, Northampton. 

SEPT. 9-11: Franklin County Fair 
in Greenfield. 

SEPT. 15 24: Eastern States 
Exposition in Ex. Fg. 

SEPT. 20 24: Championship Horse 
Show in Ex. Fg. 

(Continued on Page 6) 




I 



University of Massachusetts 
June 2!l, lt>72 Volume I. Issue 2 

"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 




s?*c 



<^ l nidenlified pedestrian dolls shoes while crossing Campus Pond 

Bridge near Kin* Arts Center construction, (trier Photo bv Steve 
Schmidt). 



Frosh Flee Flash Flood 















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Students wade to Whit more as waist deep water washes down 
Mass. \\e. <l rier Photo h\ l.ari\ Oold>. 

Wilson Speaks 
On Own Life 



Bv BRK.NDA KIKTAK 
■ad JIM GOLD 

A severe thunder shower ac- 
companied by high winds caught 
the Amherst area by surprise 
around (J o'clock last evening. The 
storm resulted in the evacuation of 
Hills North and South dormitories, 
■water damage in the Campus 
renter, flooded homes and 
businesses, and washed out streets 
all within the Amherst area 

Residents of Hills North and 
South were evacuated to Ciormond 
House because of basement 
flooding and tear Of structural 
damaged 

Water which entered the Campus 
Center through elevator shafts 
resulted in a three-four inch lake 
on the second level. 

When asked about the extent of 
damage to the Campus Center 
assistant building manager. Bud 
Watts said the exact extent would 



not he known until today, when 
water seepage and run-off could be 
located ." There appeared to be no 
damage above the second floor 
although water was running from 
the elevator shafts he said. Most of 
the second and basement levels 
received some damage. 

A lecture by dahan Wilson had to 
be moved from the CC Auditorium 
to the Student Union Ballroom 
because of the flooding in the 
building. Also, the Bluewall 
Cafeteria on the second level was 
closed down In the Student Ac- 
tivities area, considerable damage 
was done to Gerry Seanlon's office 
Scanlon is the Acting Campus 
Center Director Also swamped 
were the offices of the Student 
Prion Campus Center Governing 
Board, the Program Council, and 
Program Advisor Jim Riley's off ice 
Celling tiles were reported loose or 
falling in these areas. 

Driving during the worst parts of 
the storm became almost im- 
possible as visibility approached 
zero feet at times. 

According to Amherst Fire 



Captain Kdward Markert. the 
storm lasted about one and a half 
hours. During one hour the rain 
came down "as hard as you ever 
want to see it come" he explained 
m a W'HYN i Springfield > in- 
terview. 

He said that damage was ex 
tensive in many homes and 
businesses, some reporting as 
much as "five to six feet of water in 
basements ." He went on to say that 
two trees had been knocked down 
by the storm and that Amherst 
center had been without power for 
about halt an hour 

A trier check of area Streets 
turned up this: 

-crews attempting to clear water 
from parking area 11 . 

the campus pond enlarged 
enough to swallow benches around 
it and almost the entire bridge next 
to the Fine Arts Center; 
-sections of Triangle Street and 
Fast Pleasant Street closed to 
traffic due to flooding 
-many people walking around 
barefoot after the rainfall enjoying 
themselves 



\Howknd Serves As Legal Counsel\ 



By 111 KM KOCH 

Speaking to a standing room only 
crowd of over 700 students. C.ahan 
Wilson told of a lifetime 01 taiiuie 
He had difficulty in getting and 
holding employment, difficulty in 
being published i until Collier's*, 
.ind difficulty at I Mass. being 
i Diced to mine into the S.l\ 
Ballroom when the C C 
\uditonum was flooded All this 
popularity can be attributed to 



what Wilson calls his "pre-hterate 
education." 

Wilson, who feels thai toilet 
paper "should be handled with 
dignity", depicts the •awful" 
world of the child, and how it acts 
upon him when he has done wrong. 
Where dot's Wilson get his in- 
spirations from' 1 "I'm very 
grateful to werewolves, they have 
given me lots of great ideas Crime 
ha8 been a great help, too." 



Registration Termed Best 



B> K\I5I\ Kt I KIIU S 

What was termed the "best 
registration" by Sandra W'atkins of 
the Registrar's office took place 
Monda> when IH50 undergraduates 
and 1LM4 graduate students signed 



up in Boyden gymnasium for 
summer courses 

Filtering the registration areas 
was quite easily accomplished 
throughout the day Leaving. 
1 Continued on Page gi 



B\ USA CASTILLO 

Free legal aid is available for 
I Mass students this summer 

Richard H \v land. 
Massachusetts attorney and 
member of the bar. is available 
any time either at his office in the 
Campus Center or at home for 
emergencies "I represent the 
student 1 am not a part of the 
administration." declared 
How land. 

Broderick 
Resigns 

Francis L. Broderick. Chan- 
cellor of I' Mass-Boston announced 
his resignation earlier this week It 
was accepted and approved by the 
Board of Trustees at a meeting in 
Waltham today Details behind the 
resignation were not available Dr 
Broderick will remain with the 
I'nivorsity as a Commonwealth 
Professor 



[lowland will discuss with "any 
student any legal problem or any 
problem they think is legal He 
advises on •divorce. lan- 
dlord tenant matters, drugs, 
alcohol, auto damage, consumer 
protection and more." 

If you are arrested. How land 
suggests that you invest your one 
phone call in a chat with himself. 
He will call the people you want 
informed so they can get your bail. 
His capacities are the same as a 
tegular lawyer but he decides 
where the cut-oil poini is 



To get in touch w Kb Ho 
call his office at 545-034] or -'"p in 
at 107 on the student aeti\ itv level 
of the Campus Center oil ice hours 
are: 12-2 Tues . 10-2 Wed ' 10-12 
Thurs. If you can't tind him there, 
his home number is 25H-844H. 

Hired by the I Mn*s Student 
Senate three years ago Rowland is 
the first in the eountrv with this 
type ot service tor students II 
sees oxer torty people daily He 
assures a completely confidential 
ses>ion" it consulted in a lawyer- 
client situation 





( eilini; lile* -ii. 

left, cleanup u» w *quceitet"* m\ inches oi nature'* Mm i 
c.i . Concoui'M'. Both Phottw h> Steve Schmidt Km 
picture* see page "• 



HURSDAY, JUNE 29, 1972 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JUNE 29, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Paqe Three 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in tht Campus Center, 
Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for the contents. No 
copy is censored by the administration before Publication. Represented for 
national advertising by National Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



Kditor-in-Chief 
Continuity Director 
Photo Staff 

News Staff 

Moral Guidance 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Larry Gold, Stephen Schmidt, 

Carl Nash, Karin Ruckhaus 

Brenda Furtak, Gil Salk, 

Kathy Edmund, Elleni Koch 

Snoopy, The Wizard, 

The R.S.O. Team 



I 



The Threshold of a relationship. 




rt Buchwqld\ 



vv Flight 451 now loading for Tel Aviv, Israel/* 

Off To A Bad Start 



T-i 11 T* T^^.^.1^ ^r The sensuous summer semester of 1972 entire period even though all the day's 

r 2ire WG J 1 O 1 oPPing has so far shown itself to be subject to the material has been covered, even when they 
* ^"^ * * O same faulty pi ann i n g n the part of the are unwilling to go into the next day's 

administration and insensitivity on behalf lecture. 

of the instructors as any other semester. Many books were ordered too late to 
Although registration was smoother than arrive for the first assignment, some were 

usual, but long lines still prevailed. Rather not ordered at all. Expensive hardbound 

than waiting to enter, students had to wait 

to get out. Most assigned rooms are too 

small or too large for the enrolled classes 

there 



WASHINGTON -The Supreme 
Court's decision which ruled that 
the Justice Department could not 
hug or wiretap anyone without 
court approval has put a pall on 
Washington 

In a town where status symbols 
arc essential, being bugged by the 
Justice Department was the 
highest honor the government 
could bestow on one of its citizens. 
It meant the person was important 
.•nough to warrant surveillance 
and his work was so meaningful 
that the FBI was worried about 
him 

one ot the biggest gambits of a 
lawyer or lobbyist in Washington 
has been to say to the client. •We'd 
better not discuss this on the 
phone. I think my line is tapped.'' 

The client would be immediately 
impressed and the lawyer or 
lobbyist would then double his fee. 

The same went for 

newspapermen stationed in this 
I nun 

\ wise correspondent would call 
bis editor and say. 'Jeff, pass the 
word at the paper that if anyone at 
the office has anything important 
to s;iv. not to call me at home 
They've got me bugged They're 
furious at the White House about 
the story I did on urban develop- 
ment, and I hear the word is out to 
lind out who leaked it If I have 
anything important to report. I'll 
<ail you from a pay phone." 




texts are still preferred to paperbacks. 
Students are still denied eligibility to the 
trade, educational, quantity, and cash 
discounts on regular, high and over-priced 



Instructors have emphasized covering paperbacks, 

the same material in 8 weeks as they would Perhaps the student body will become 

in the normal 13 week sessions instead of tired of this shoddy treatment and push 

imparting knowledge to the student. Some their store and their instructors to respond 

feel compelled to keep their class for an to their needs. 

Ca mpus Carousel 

Women And Responsibility 



Militants Dismayed 
Most militant protest groups are 
disturbed by the Supreme Court 
ruling 

sam I^a Barbe. the leader of the 

Students' Committee Against 

Students, told me. "The Supreme 

Court took all the fun out of 

protesting We used to sit for hours 

making obscene phone calls to 

friends telling Nixon. Agnew, John 

Mitchell and Kleindienst where to 

go Now it's hardly worth the 

dime " 

At cocktail parties almost 

"is one in Washington talked 

it being bugged. This is how 

I w < onversation would go: 

Helen, when I called you 
yesterday, I had the most terrible 
connection." 

Yes, everyone is complaining 
jitxni! it Charles told me last night 

he heard they had a 24-hour 

.Mi his line and it was 
kening the circuit ." 
Why would they want to tap 

ms' He's certainly a small 

I i town." 



"I resent that remark. Ethel 
Charles has a very important job 
as far as the authorities are con 
cerned. and we've been tapped for 
over a year When was the last 
time anyone tapped Williams 
telephone'''' 

We've been tapped through 
three different administrations." 

You made that up. Who cares 
what William has to say''" 

The host would then interject, "I 
wish you girls wouldn't talk so 
loud. I know someone has planted a 
bug in the chandelier." 

It was so important to be tapped 
in Washington that it is rumored 
many people used to install their 
own bugs in the wall and show 
them to friends as the real thing 

I know one columnist who always 
insisted we walk in the garden 
when we talked about anything, as 
he claimed all his paintings had 
been wired by the FBI. 



COED AUTO MECHANICS 

course at Northern Illinois U. is 
creating a new image of the 
"helpful female," according to a 
story in The Northern Star, 
campus newspaper. 

More than 75 coeds enrolled for a 
variety of reasons. 

Diane Harwood, Anthro '73. 
wants to know "if I'm being taken 
for a ride by mechanics." 

Mary Caruso. Spec. Ed.. '73: how 
to change a tire 

Francine Chernivsky, Soc. '73, 
hopes to learn "what to look for in 
buying a new car and ways to save 
time and money if the car stalls or 
a tire goes flat." 



By TONY GRANITE 

The three-week course may not 
make top-flight mechanics in 
skirts, but it might satisfy Debra 
Orbik. Art '74, who said she took 
the course "so if my car makes 
funny noises. I'll know why." 



RESPONSIBILITY in the 

campus press of Florida is being 
studied by the Board of Regents, 
which is holding public hearings 
June 1. 



The Regents are considering a 



Industry Knoouraged 
It's going to be hard in 
Washington to find something to 
replace the status of being bugged 
or wiretapped The only answer is 
that since the government can't do 
it. private industry will have to 
take over. 

This could, in effect, be what the 
bugging attempt of the Democratic 
National Committee was all about. 
Thanks to the five men who were 
caught trying to bug the 
Democratic headquarters, the 
Democrats have more status now 
than they ever had before Until 
the incident, no one in Washington 
had ever heard of the Democratic 
Party. But since the incident, its 
prestige has risen and. for the first 
time, the Democrats are being 
taken seriously in 1972. 

Copyright 1972. Los Angeles 
Times 



Letter To The Editor 



To the Kditor. 

On May 1, 1972, an article appeared ir. The Springfield Daily News 
entitled "UM Doctor Plans To Make Available VD Technique To All." In 
this article. Dr. Madsen is quoted as stating that he has established an 
institute related to venereal disease detection using a technique 
developed at the UMass Health Services. 

The University does not. at this time, endorse the scientific claims 
made by Dr. Madsen. 

It should be furthermore noted that the institute referred to in this 
article is in no way associated with or connected to the University Health 
Services or UMass. 

BARRY W.AVERILL 
Director 

University Health Services 

Univ. of Mass. 

Amherst 



Bilingual Instruction 

Starting next September, any Massachusetts school system with at 
least l>0 linguistically handicapped students will have to provide bilingual 
instruction until the children reach sufficiency in English The state will 
foot the additional costs 

An estimated 40.000 children living in the state, most of them Puerto 
Rican or Portuguese, will benefit from the new law. 



proposal to relieve university 
presidents of all responsibility for 
the contents of student-run campus 
newspapers. It calls for non-profit 

corporations to be set up to 
produce the papers off- campus, 
without state funds or interference, 
according to a story in the USoFla 
Oracle. 

The proposal had been triggered 
by a recent ruling by the state's 
attorney general that university 
presidents cannot censor contents 
of campus papers. 

"All a president can do is fire the 
student editor if state law or 
university regulations are 
violated." 

**** 
CilMMK K OF THK WKKK is the 

center spread of the Portland 
(Ore) State Vanguard. Labeled as 
a "Henry Kissinger bath mat." it is 
designed "for people with cold feet 
about the war in Southeast Asia." 



For The 
Record 

On the editorial page on Monday. 
June 26, The Crier printed an 
editorial originally broadcast py 
WHYN. Although it was unin- 
tentional, it looked to some of our 
readers that we were endorsing tnt 
WHYN viewpoint. We were not. we 
merely wished to present a 
viewpoint from outside the UMass 
community. We sincerely regrei 
any errors of interpretation 

The Editors 



Rep. Olver Reveals Plans | Flaming Hot Pants 

JL rw.** nna half minim riisnnsahle women's Danties destini 

For State Senate Campaign 



Northampton -State 
Representative John W. Olver <D- 
Amherst) has announced that he 
will be a candidate for State Senate 
in the Franklin-Hampshire 
District. 

Rep. Olver will be seeking to 
unseat Sen. John Barrus <R- 
(loshen). 

Citing his four years of service to 
the people of the Hampshire 
District, Olver said he was taking 
"this difficult course", because, 
"This area cannot afford to be 
represented in the Senate by a 
narrow outlook better suited to a 
different era." 

"This district is perhaps the 
most diverse in the state. It has 
towns ranging in size from 200 to 
30,000. There is, in this district, the 
most productive farm land and 
farmers in the state. We have a 
thriving construxtion business, 
built on residential and in- 
stitutional growth. It has 10,000 
people employed in education, 
public and private, secondary and 
higher. We have in this district 
broad-based industrial com- 
munities. 

"This diversified area needs 
new, progressive leadership in the 
Senate, which I believe I can 
provide." 

The Franklin-Hampshire district 
includes 41 towns and 1 city. It is 
the most far flung in 

Massachusetts, consisting of one- 
seventh of the total land area in the 
state. The district includes such 




State Rep. Olver 

larger population centers as Great 
Barrington, near the New York 
border, Greenfield and Montague 
in the north, Amherst, South 
Hadley, Northampton and 
Easthampton. 

Rep. Olver, at a morning press 
conference, listed many areas 
where he has acted, and areas in 
which he believes action is still 
needed. He outlined his role in such 
issues as sponsoring reginal 
transportation districts, protection 
for flood plains, strengthening 
solid waste legislation, and 
providing a comprehensive new 
agency for waste management, 
legislation to facilitate group 
residences for the retarded and 
disturbed, and limiting the Con- 
necticut River diversion. 



News In Brief 



He also stressed his involvement 
in lowering the age of majority, in 
state acquisition of the Nor- 
thampton School for Girls for a 
comprehensive center for children 
and families, his position on a 
citizens advisory group planning a 
national park facility, and his 
efforts in advancing women's 
rights, insuring participation in the 
political process, major tax 
reform, and improved public 
transportation that would benefit 
the elderly and handicapped. 

Rep. Olver added, "I stand on a 
proven record of performance in 
these and other issues. We cannot 
afford to languish under old 
viewpoints when our problems cry 
out for new solutions." 

Rep. Olver, 35, is a two term 
state representative from the 
Second Hampshire District. He has 
been a member of the Tran- 
sportation, the Education and the 
Commerce and Labor Committees, 
and a member of several special 
commissions. Among these have 
been, the Special Commission to 
Investigate Conditions at 
Belchertown State School and 
Monson State Hospital, the Special 
Commission to study the need for a 
Connecticut Basin District Council, 
Chairman of a 14 member Citizen's 
Advisory Committee on the Con- 
necticut River Historic Riverway, 
and as Chairman of the Com- 
mission on Lowering the Age of 
Majority. 

Olver, a graduate of R.P.I. , Tufts 
and MIT, is a faculty member, 
on leave from the University of 
Massachusetts. He is a member of 
the Amherst Town Meeting. A 
resident and homeowner in 
Amherst, Olver and his wife Rose 
have one daughter. 



Over one half million disposable women's panties destined to be 
packaged with a new album by theatrical rock star Alice Cooper have 
been seized by U.S. customs agents in Philadelphia on the grounds that 
they're more than hot stuff. The undies have been tested by officials of the 
Federal Trade Commission against standards established by the 
Flammable Fabric Act (Public Law 88) and the panties, made of "non- 
woven fabric." flunked the FTC's tests. 

The panties were manufactured in Great Britain, at this time there is 
no such product domestically manufactured. The Alice Cooper record 
album package for which the scanty drawers are intended is "School s 
out," and was designed by Craig Braum (the man who invented the 
Roliing Stones zipper album) for Wilkes & Braun Inc. The album 
features, aside from the record itself, a simulated school desk, complete 
with simulated chewing gum on the bottom and comic book and marbles 
inside The panties were meant to be used as auto antenna pennants to be 
proudly flown in the time-honored school-boy tradition. 

A representative of the pantie importer pointed out that federal 
statutes concerning flammability are not entirely clear. According to a 
spokesman for the importer disposable surgical apparel made of the 
same material as the panties is not subject to the FTC flammability 
codes. In effect, this means that a doctor could wear the Alice Cooper 
panties on his head as a surgical cap and there would be no violation (in 
legal terms) involved. 

At the moment there is some question whether the Alice Cooper panties 
should be classified as apparel or as a purely promotional, non-wearable 
device. In any case, the government has played a major part in holding 
up the release of the long-awaited "School's Out" album. The panties 
were seized on May 30th and were not tested for flammability until seven 
working days later due to the fact that the ovens in which fabrics are 
tested were moved to new quarters that week in Washington, D.C. Alice, 
Braun, the pantie company, Warner Bros, and an estimated three and a 
half million Alice Cooper fans had to bide their time while the 
bureaucrats were moving their pantie-testing ovens one block away. 



Taxes Taken 

The Massachusetts Legislature 
passed the $2,181 billion budget 
yesterday, but immediately put 
into the works a $22 million 
"oversight" budget. 

Before final enactment, there 
also was an unsuccessful attempt 
to reopen the budget and add $9 
million owed to 241 communities; 
and some recriminations over the 
session last Friday at which the 
budget was initially passed with 
only five senators present. 

Taxes Spent 

The Senate has voted $200 million 
in emergency relief funds for 
victims of tropical storm Agnes in 
the Eastern United States, 
doubling the amount requested by 
Presidnt Nixon. 

In a two-pronged effort to help 
flood-stricken areas, the White 
House asked Tuesday for urgent 
approval of $100 million in flood 
aid, and announced a two-day tour 
by Vice President Spiro T. Agnew 
of battered cities in Virginia, 
Maryland and New York. 

The Senate acted almost im- 
mediately. The $200 million would 
be administered by the Office of 
Emergency Preparedness, which 
already has disaster relief fund of 
$92.5 million. 

The Cease-Fire 
William Whitelaw, Britain's 
minister for Northern Ireland, 
meets militant Protestant leaders 
today in an attempt to convince 
them not to disturb the fragile 
cease-fire now in its second day. 
Whitelaw hoped to persuade the 
Protestants that the government's 
new conciliatory approach to the 
Irish Republican Army is not a 
sellout and will serve the interests 
of Northern Ireland's Protestant 
majority as well as the Roman 
Catholic minority. 

The War 
The South Vietnamese govern- 
ment today launched its first at- 
tempt to recapture Quang Tri 
Province. More than 10,000 
marines and paratroopers crossed 
the My Chanh river along a 10-mile 
front stretching from the South 
China Sea to the jungled foothills 
west of Highway 1. 

U.S. B52 bombers dropped some 
1 ,350 tones of explosives to open the 
way for the push. Tanks, artillery, 



U.S. gunfire from ships offshore 
and American fighter-bombers 
supported the advancing troops. 

The Peace 

India and Pakistan toughened 
their stands in preparation for 
today's start of peace talks bet- 
ween Prime Minister Indira 
Gandhi and President Zulfikar Ali 
Bhutto. 

Indian spokesmen said their 
government and Bangladesh had 
agreed that the 91,000 Pakistani 
prisoners of war in India will not be 
returned to Pakistan until Bhutto 
recognizes the cease-fire line 
through Kashmir as an in- 
ternational boundary and 
recognizes Bangladesh as an in- 
dependent nation. 

The End 

President Nixon announced 
today plans for a two-month with- 
drawal of 10,000 U.S. troops from 
South Vietnam and directed that 
only draftees who volunteer be sent 
there in the future. 

Nixon's action would reduce the 
authorized troop level to 39,00 by 
Sept. 1. 

The average monthly with- 
drawal rate of 5,000 for the sum- 
mer months was half the level of 
the May-June rate of 10,000. 

Press secretary Ronald L. 
Ziegler, who made Nixon's an- 
nouncement, said the President 
also ordered that no draftees will 
be sent to South Vietnam unless 
they volunteer for service there. 

However, Ziegler said, if they 
are already in the war zone or 
under orders to go there, they will 
stay or be sent. 

He estimated there are some 
4,000 draftees in the Army in South 
Vietnam. 



Sm the Ufaytttt 

Salt M in Pwious 
Monday Crier 



Cowles-Lane-Laundromat 

(REAR OF GASLIGHT II) 

One day service in wash, dried & folded 

9 lbs. $1.50 (15 cents for 
each additional lb.) 

Men's shirts - Finished 
30 cents 

DRY CLEANING 

Men's (2 pc.)suits 1.25 Men's Trousers .6,5 
Ladies(plain)dresses 1.25 Sweaters .75 
Men's sport coats .65 Trench coats 1.25 



All This And More: UNIVERSITY STORE 



The trade book department's 
primary tunction is to provide those 
books supplemental to the student's 
required course books. This depart- 
ment will also special order any book 
that is not currently in stock. 



FREE DELIVERY 
Available all summer 

99* Student Special 

2 pieces of chicken, buttered roll, 
cole slaw, corn on the cob, and soft 

drink — 

or buckets and barrels of chicken 

$5 minimum order 

Kinticky Fried Chicken 



Call 256-8745 



Among the best-selling 
in stock, we suggest: 



^erbacks 



The Female Eunuch 

by Germaine Greer 

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee 

by Dee Brown 

Brian Piccolo - A Short Season 

by Jeannie Morris 

The Exorcist 

by William Peter B la tty 



Think 

Clothing 

Boutique: 



for UMass 

T-shirts and jackets 

for discounted pants 

for summer tanks 
and skinny ribs 

for essential 

campus wear 



All Textbooks at 
PHYSICAL PLANT 

8 a.m. — 4 p.m. Monday — Friday 
C losed Saturdays 



UNIVERSITY STORE 

Campus Center 

8:30 a.m. — 4:30 p.m. Mon. — Fri. 
Closed Saturdays 



Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JUNE 29, W2 



1 Draft Counselor 's Corner 1 ^^ t 

If You Need Help With The Draft 



By GILBERT J. BALK 

Welcome to summer school. 
Before I start on the draft, which is 
a pretty depressing subject, let me 
share another unhappy bit of news 
with you. According to the Old 
Farmers' Almanac, there will be a 
grand total of 9 (count em -9) 
sunny days this summer. The first 
was Tuesday. Now don't you wish 
you had gone to Morocco for the 
summer' 



A news note. There is a draft 
counseling service on campus, 
courtesy of the Student Govern- 
ment Assn. Regular hours are 9:00 
to noon Monday through Thursday, 
but appointments can be made for 
other hours. The office is located in 
»23 Campus Center, but will 
usually be located at a table near 
the bookstore during the summer. 

Blood, Sweat & Tears 

LENOX — Blood, Sweat & Tears, 
the band that began it all, will 
appear in concert at 6 p.m. 
Saturday and Sunday at the Lenox 
Arts Center. 

Blood, Sweat & Tears is com- 
posed of Dave Bargeron, trom- 
bine; Bobby Colomby, drums; Jim 
Fielder, Electric bass; Jerry 
Fisher, lead vocals; Steve Katz, 
guitar and harmonica; Lou Marini, 
Jr., saxophone; Lew Soloff, 
trumpet and flugelhorn; George 
V'r.denius, guitar; Larry Willis, 
keyboard; and Chuck Winfield, 
• urn pet and flugelhorn. 



Look for a sign which says "draft 
info". The phone number is 545- 
0813. 

And now, on to the draft. This 
will be a weekly column, dealing in 
greater depth with the information 
outlined today. 

First, let's run through some of 
the major classifications. A 1-A 
classification means you are draft- 
eligible, provided that you either 
turn twenty this year, or are 
already older than twenty, that you 
have passed a pre-induction 
physical during the past 12 months, 
and that your lottery number, 
which you received (and keep 
forever i during the year you 
turned 19. is reached before Dec. 
31. 

A 1-A-O or 1-0 classification 
means that you are a conscientious 
objector to participation in war 



because of religious, moral, 
ethical, or philosophical beliefs 
and training. You do not need to be 
a pacifist to get a CO classification. 
You don't have to be opposed to 
violence or self-defense, or even to 
the conduct of wars. The key to the 
CO position is that you must be 
opposed to participating in war. It 
is not an impossible classification 
to receive. If you're against killing 
or war, you should consult a draft 
counselor about this possibility. 

If a member of your immediate 
family (father, brother, sister) 
died as a result of military-related 
injury or disease, you may qualify 
for a 4-G deferment. Consult a 
draft counselor. 

If you have a medical history 
which indicates that you might be 
unable to perform any duty 
required of you by the military, 
vou may be deferrable. 



I 



UMass Summer Concert 




On Friday night June 30th the 
Old Chapel Contemporary Music 
Ensemble will present its first 
summer concert at the University 
of Massachusetts. The program 
will include: Music for oboe and 
piano by Gerald Chenoweth; 
Homage a Thomas Beckett by 
John Holland; Sonata for clarinet 
and piano by James Yannatos; 
Three Songs from William 
Shakespeare, Berceuses du Chat, 
and Octet for Wind Instruments by 
Igor Stravinsky. The members of 



the Old Chapel Contemporary 
Music Ensemble are professional 
musicians from the five-college 
area. The group was formed to 
provide an opportunity to present 
new as well as standard twentieth 
century musical ideas to listeners 
in the community. The concert will 
be given in the Colonial Lounge of 
the Old Student Union, beginning 
at 8:00 p.m. The program is free of 
charge, and all interested persons 
are warmly invited to attend. 



Johnston, Lawson Lead Training 



The list I'Mass Police Training 
Institute began this week at the 
Amherst campus and will run 
through \ug. 4. 

Campus police officers from 
Vmherst. Mount Holyoke and Smith 
Colleges and Bottom State College 
are joining those from UMass as 
trainees in the six week course. 
Classroom and practical in- 
struction will cover a wide range- 
fingerprinting, civil liberties, 
human relations, laKv of arrest, 
report writing, first aid. narcotics. 



search and seizure, juvenile 
delinquency, physical training and 
many other subjects. 

UMass Security Director David 
L. Johnston and Associate Director 
for Training Allan Lawson head a 
faculty that includes UMass 
security personnel, local, state and 
federal law enforcement officers, 
and UMass faculty and students. 

Besides our own people we utilize 
personnel from the State Police, 
the Cambridge and Medford Police 



Departments, the Community 
Assistance Group of the Depart- 
ment of Public Safety, the Registry 
of Motor Vehicles, the FBI, and 
others," Johnston said. 

The objective of the institute is to 
provide higher quality police 
service to university and college 
communities. Future training 
programs may offer college credit 
through the UMass Division of 
Continuing Education, Johnston 
said. 



Remember, many seemingly 
minor problems can lead to 
deferments, so don't just assume 
that vou're healthy and let it go. 
See a draft counselor. The same is 
true of various emotional 
prol>le4m^-or-h4stories-o f th e m, of 
convictions for felonies, of arrests 
which are still in the jurisdiction of 
the courts, of drug use. and so on. 

If you're being drafted would 
pose an extreme financial, 
emotional, or physical hardship on 
anyone else, you may qualify for a 
:?-A hardship deferment. 

And, of course, if you were a full- 
time student in a college or 
university before July 1971, and 
you are still in your original 
graduating class, you probably 
qualify for a 2-S student deferment. 

There are many other deferment 
possibilities which may be 
available to you. Only a qualified 
draft counselor can fully evaluate 
your specific situation and give you 

No Classes 
On July 4 

According to a spokeswoman for 
the Provost's office, classes will be 
held on Monday, July 3, but not at 
ah on Tuesday, July 4, In- 
dependence Day. 

Also, at the direction of Governor 
Francis W. Sargent, all employees 
whose services can be spared on 
Monday, July 3, at the discretion of 
their department heads, may be 
granted that day off without loss of 
pay. However, all offices must be 
kept open and essential services 
provided on July 3 in accordance 
with the law. 



CRIER CLASSIFIEDS 

50* 
EACH INSERTION 



CLASSIFIED INSERTION ORDER 



Client 



Token By 



DATES TO RUN 
Ran 



Payment Received 



Headline 



ADVERTISING COPY 



r 


































» — 











































































































































1 




























1 : i i 




i 




... 

















the most accurate information 
about your options. 

Now, in terms of the lottery for 
this year: Everyone who is 
otherwise eligible to be drafted, 
and vvho has a lottery number of 75 
or below, will be ca lled during the 
month of August. There are no 
guarantees for the rest of the year, 
but it seems to be a safe bet that 
they will not call over number 125, 
the number they reached last year 

If I may venture out on a limb, 
I'll make a couple of predictions 

1. Sometime before the end ol 
ugust. Dick Nixon will announce a 
zero draft call for the remainder ol 
the year. He will assure us that this 

t is not a political move, any more 
than the ecological destruction ol 
southern Vietnam by saturation 
bombing is political. 

2. The draft law, which is due to 
expire in June 1973, will not be 
extended. That will put me out of a 
job, save thousands from being 
fucked over by draft hassles, and 
take even more strength away 
from the anti-war movement. It 
will make the anti-military 
movement an almost impossible 
task. 

3. The war will continue as a 
major air war, for months after 
total troop withdrawal. It will kill 
thousands more of your brothers 
and sisters in Vietnam. Think 
about it. 

PEACE 



See the Lafayette 

Sale Ad in 

Previous 
Monday Crier 



Crier Classifieds 



FOR SALE 



1964 Chevrolet Impala Con 
vertible, good condition, contact 
Larry at 549 6676 or leave 
message at Crier office. 

6/29 

1971 Ford Torino Squire Station 
Wagon V 8, power brakes, 
power steering, gray gold — 
3,000 miles. Best Offer. Call 
253 5641. 

8/15 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

Own room $80/m. New mod. 
apt, ww carpet, pool, air con 
ditioning, etc. Mt. Sugarloaf 
Apts. Call Ken 665 4169. 

7/6 



SERVICES 

Pottery lessons — in Amherst, 
begins the week of July 2. Fred 
Englander 253 9360. 

6/29 



1970 Plymouth Valiant 
must sell — moving, 
steering, automatic 
mission, 4 polyglass 
radio. Call 546-4514. 



Duster, 
Power 

trans- 
tires, 

6/29 



1964 Ford Custom — excellent 
shape. $350.00. Spencer's Mobil 
station. 161 N. Pleasant St. 
(next to P.O.) 253 9059. 

6/29 



Used bicycles 


inexpensive. 


Come to 427 N. 


Pleasant St., 


Apt. 105. 






6/29 



Stereo — KLH Model 20. Ex 
cellent condition. 8 track tape 
deck included. $200.00. Call 256 
8511. 

6/29 

FOR SALE — See and drive this 
one first- 1966 Rambler Classic. 
Attractive hardtop lines. Big 327 
HP V8 engine in fine condition. 
Dependable. 545 1532 days, 256 
8446 evenings 'til 11. 



Light hauling and moving. 
Reasonable rates. Call Jeff at 
253 2755 or Bill at 256 8258. 

7/6 

SUMMER TUNE UPS — some 
are not! Ours are and only $3.95 
a cylinder includes new 
Champion plugs, points, con 
denser, carburetor purge, and 
electronic timing. Spencer's 
Mobil 161 N. Pleasant St. (next 
to P.O.) 253 9059. 



RID ES WANTED 

From Longmeadow or 
Springfield to campus, 9:00 
9: 30 a.m., and back 2: 00 3: 00 
p.m. Will pay. 567 8317. 

6/29 



PERSONAL 



WANTEDTO RENT 



Graduate couple and baby 
coming to UMass in fall, looking 
♦or couple(s) and/or 

family(ies) for communal 
living. Contact Frank and Carol 
L eavitt, Apf . 118, 360 West North 
College St., Yellow Springs, 
Ohio, 45387. 513 767 7133. 



FOR RENT 



Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $185/M incl utilities. Call 
Resident Mgr 665 4239, if no 
answer 1 786 0500. 

8/15 



FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207 T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

8/15 



AVOID an automotive RIP 
OFF. No charge for estimates 
on repairs. All work guaranteed, 
at Spencer's Mobil 161 N 
Pleasant St. (next to P.O.) 253 

9050. 

6/29 



NOTICE 

To ALL Students, Faculty, 
etc.: You are invited to meet 
each Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. for 
an informal Christian Science 
College Organization 
testimonial meeting. Call 256 
8740 (evenings) for location. 



THURSDAY, JUNE 29, 1972 




The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Five 

| 

I 




Campus Police near YYhitmore check up on Physical Plant during 
storm. (Crier Photo bv Larrv (ield). 



Campus Center custodians (ieorge (left) and John (right) water 
vac the Auditoriums teakwood floor last night. (Crier Photo by 
Steve Schmidt). 



Further Flash Flood Photos 





Tree downs power line on Fearing St. as storm damage spreads 
across town. (Photo by \l \lc.\rdle). 



Kids swim to Lincoln Apts. 
through flooded Lot II. (Larry 
(.old Photo). 




See the Lafayette 

Sale Ad in Previous 

Monday Crier 



Cinema Series 

Anthony Quinn stars as a fighter 
dragged down by his manager 
Tuesday night at 7 in "Requiem for 
a Heavyweight." The movie, which 
will be shown in the Campus 
Center Auditorium will also star 
Jackie Gleason as the manager. 

Termed a drama, the first of 
Tuesday's double feature will run 
K."> minutes. It was adepated from a 
hook by Rod Serling, creator of the 

Twilight Zone" and "Night 
Gallery". "The Cardinal", 
starring John Tryon, will begin at 
•t, Tuesday night. It is the story of 
an American from the time of his 
ordination as a priest through his 
ordination as a cardinal. It shows 
the conflicts he faces against men 
and the world. 

Admission is free to both movies. 
Seating priority will be given to 
I'Mass summer students. 



Delivery 




We are always thinking ot better ways to 
serve our old as well as our new customers. 
It you are a new customer/ we will provide 
you with a pleasant dining room/ music, 
outside patio; plus tree delivery. 



K«ntitfky fried ^kidctn 



* 



Mop._Th.urs. 11 a.m. — 12midnite 
p r i_Sat — Sun 11 a.m. — 2 a.m. 

Rte. 9 (Opposite Zayre's Shopping Center) 

Call 256-8745 



Vorth Pleasant St. nearly impassable due to shower-induced 
flooding. < Al Mc Ardle photo). 



FRIDAY NIGHT SERVICES 7:30 p.m. 

Hillel Center — 420 Student Union 

Summer Activities will be discussed afterwards. 



sit v ol Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JUNE 29, 1972 



THURSDAY, JUNE 29, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 



McGovern Tax Proposal Analyzed 



\li ■< iovern's 

i)|»osal> lias stirred up more 

ind contusion than his earlier 

■ - , "in ■ in ,'\ en man. woman 

i iklahoma Cit\ tins week. 

i \U-< uncni disclosed that he was 

;i substitute welfare reform plan 

. somewhat less costly bj 

tit* urants or tax credits of J3.7(M) 

it her than sjjmo to a lamily ol tour, would 

II lamilies except those with in- 

nines over S20.UOO. and would provide 

klher credits lor adults than .or young 

hildren 

Economic Vn a lysis 

l> the MctJovern proposal feasible or 

Hiiiii it -till impose unbearably heavy tax 

iiirdeiis nil upper-income earners'? Is it a 

adieal proposal or is it simply a more 

beral variant ot the negative income tax. 

originally proposed by the conservative 

I nncrsity. ol Chicago economist. Milton 

1 nrdman" 

In an effort to clarify the McGovern plan 
lor income redistribution, we have in- 
lorviewod one ol the nation's leading tax 
authorities. Joseph A Pechman. director of 
• idiiomic studies of the Brookings In- 
-titution 

iM ESTION: What is the difference 
between Senator McGovern 's tax credit 
proposal and the negative income tax idea"' 
WSUI.K: The two are very closely 
related. Under a negative income tax. every 
lamily is entitled toa minimum income, and 
n- income is subject to tax. usually at a 
relatively high rate. say. 50 per cent If the 
minimum guarantee is 82.401) tor a lamily of 
lour and the tax rate is 30 per cent, the 
lamily would break even at S4.H0O If the tax 
rate is ISIJ-2 •'> per cent <as it is under the 
House version ol H.R.I >. the break-even 
{Niint would be SUGOU. Senator McGovern is 
suggesting a much higher basic minimum- 
nitially M.tNNiand now apparently 83,700 for 
,i lamily ol our and a much lower tax rate- 
.pparently about 33-1 :f per cent. 

What is new about Senator McGovern's 
idea is that the negative income tax part of 
the plan is integrated with the positive in- 
come tax otherwise, many people who 



would he eligible to receive a check from the 
i iovernment-f or the negative income tax 
part ot the plan-would also have to pay 

The tax credit idea combines the negative 
;md positive income tax elements into one 
system, so that those who are below the 
break-even point would receive one 
payment from the Government and those 
who are above the breakeven point would 
make one payment to the Government. 

1)1 ESTION: Hut isn't the tax credit plan 
outrageously expensive' 1 

WSWF.R: It is expensive m the sense that 
the tax rates on income would have to raised 
enough to cover the tax credits. An average 
si. olio per capita credit would require gross 
outlays of about SiMO-billion with this year's 
population 

Personal Exemption 

QUESTION: Do you agree with the 
estimate of Herbert Stein's I chairman of the 
President's Council of Economic Advisers) 
that, with no change in the current tax law. 
the McGovern plan would require a flat 
Federal income tax rate of 46 per cent of 
taxable net income in addition to the income 
tax rates now in force 

WSWF.R: Mr Stein did not take into 
account that the McGovern plan would fold 
the present personal exemption of $750 and 
the standard deduction of S2.000 into the tax 
credit Today's income tax raises about SOS- 
billion at this year's income levels. To this 
must be added the S2H)-billion of per capita 
payments, making a total of S305-billion 
required to finance both the tax-credit plan 
and the present collections from the income 
tax Since the tax base for this year should 
be about S<;<i:M>illion. the average personal 
income tax rate to finance the original 
McGovern proposal and all other current 
expenditures would be 46 per cent, not 46 per 
cent on top of existing tax rates. 

QUESTION: But don't you think that an 
average 46 per cent rate is still excessive? 

ANSWER: Yes. indeed. But two things 
should be added: First, McGovern's tax 
base would be larger than it is now. because 
McGovern is in favor of substanial tax 
reform I could easilv add S500-billion to the 



Summer Yoga 



tax base through tax reforms, and this alone 
would reduce the average tax rate from 4ii 

per tent to i> per cent 

Personal Income Gaining 

Second, the tax credit plan could not be 
put into effect before 1U74 at the earliest. By 
that time, incomes will be perhaps 15 per 
cent higher than they are in 1H7J So. evern 
w ithout tax reform, the 1**74 income tax base 
would be high enough to finance an average 
per capita payment ol $1,000 at an average 
rate ol 39 per cent With tax reform, the 
average rate need go no higher than :?6-l/2 
per cent 

Another way to look at the matter is that it 
is possible to finance an average per capita 
grant of SKiSO at this year's income levels and 
also raise the amount of tax now collected 
through the present income tax with an 
average tax rate of :56-l/2 per cent, if the tax 
base were increased by $50-billion through 
tax reform. 

This would obviously be a great im- 
provement over H.R.I, whicb has a 
minimum income guarantee of only $2,400 
as compared to $3,000 for a family of four, 
and a tax rate on the poor and near-poor of 
66-2/3 per cent instead of 36-1/2 per cent. 

QUESTION: Mr. McGovern doesn't 
propose a flat rate on all income, does he? 

ANSWER: To my knowledge, he hasn't 
said anything about this directly. But his 
numerical examples suggest that he's 
thinking of a tax rate of ?:t-l/3 per cent on at 
least the first $12,000 oi income. If this is 
what he has in mind, he will have to have 
higher tax rates about $12,000. 

Ql KSTION: How high would he have to 
go'' 

ANSWKH: Again, it all depends on the tax 
base. I could devise a rax base that would 
yield enough revenue with a rate structure 
reaching a maximum or no more than 45 per 
cent. So one of the crucial elements of the 
whole plan is tax reform, to keep rates at 
moderate levels. Further, the plan would 
not be acceptable unless everybody pays his 
fair share of the tax burden. It is simply 
unfair to tax most people's incomes at rates 

(Continued from l\»g«- I) 



ranging between 33*1 3 per cent and 45 or SO 
percent unless everybody is required to pay 
tax on his entire income. 

QUESTION: What does it depend on? 

WSWI-.H: It depends on which type of 
lamily you have in mind A lamily of lour 
with $20,000 income now pays a tax of $3,010 
it it uses the standard deduction Let's say it 
could itemize deductions of only $1,000 under 
the McGovern proposal for state income 
tax mortgage interest, and so on. so its 
taxable income would he $19,000. Suppose 
the tax rates were 33-1/3 per cent on the lirst^ 
SI 2. OOP and 40 per cent on the next $7,000. 
Then this lamily would have a gross 
payment of $6,800 but it would receive a tax 
credit, according to his latest statement, of 
$3,700 making a net payment of only $3,100. 
or $00 more than it pays today. 



Ql 'F.STIO.V In that case, wouldn't the tax 
rates above $20,000 have to be condiscatory? 

WSWKIt: No. because the break-even 
points would be much lower for smaller 
lamilies and for single people. 

Ql KSTION: Do you regard this as a 
revolutionary or radical proposal 

ANSWKH: I think it's unfortunate to use 
emotional terms like "revolutionary" or 
"radical instead of analyzing the pros and 
cons of an idea. The McGovern plan has 
been discussed in the economic literature 
for many years. It was regarded as "pie-in- 
the-sky" until now. because incomes were 
too low and the tax rate needed to finance an 
adequate tax credit scheme would have 
been too high. Incomes have grown enough 

to make it possible to finance the plan now 
with what I regard to be moderate tax rates. 

Interestingly enough, the present Tory 
Government in England seems to be con- 
sidering this type of plan seriously. In his 
last budget speech, the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer stated that the Government will 
present a tax credit plan to Parliament 
within a year or two. If the McGovern plan is 
radical, he has some very strange bed- 
fellows. 



Many people today are misin- 
formed about yoga. Yoga is not a 
torm ot mysticism and should not 
be limited to Occident. Orient. 
K.i>t or West Yoga is so much 
more than any verbal 
acknowledgement one may un- 
derhand it by We should not 
contradict yoga by placing it in a 
category or restriction it by ex- 
ternal impositions Yoga is really a 
total acknowledgement and a very 
personal life sj.yle within one's 
natural rhyfhiU And it is also very 
practical, because it is living fhe 
most real life style within the most 
real time and real space It is 
living the real'' human-being- 
person. always in a growing and 
maturing movement to the self It 
is the development toward a 
unified, wholesome, consistent 
personality And yoga is im- 
mediately healthy, relaxing and 
Miothing. and stimulating, too. both 
mentally and physically In the 
most direct way. yoga means come 
togehter Each in each, and one 
together This means unity, within 
,.nd without the self, and peace. 
between and among all of us. 

Each human life is a gift and an 

ottering in his own creation We 

snoulri be happy; we should 

uce; and we should give thanks- 

il ays Yoga is not the only way to 

this w holesomeness and happiness. 

But it is a way And it should be the 

.cant ol each of us to actualize 

thought into something real. To 

actualize and to let our lives 

develop into that offering, that 

i _' in '. hich each was created. 

thought without action is static 

and has no movement toward 

u here is meaning for 

And there is meaning 

ol i- no.'. And this simply 

l tor selt. and love 

■ 

i< i -hall be devoting 



Sti nfci Lafayette 

San to in Previous 

Monday Criar 



myself to teaching Hatha Yoga to 
people who are concerned in their 
physical and mental well being. 
Classes will be very small, (six to 

I have been studying for the past 
years with a gifted and devoted 
Micheline Varieka, who has 
studied Hatha Yoga for many 
years, practicing under a French 
priest. Father Dechanet, who has 
an open hermatige up in the 
mountains of France. Father 
Oechanet has introduced several 
books to the Western world on 
Hatha Yoga, especially em- 
phasizing the need for us not to 
limit ourselves to a categorical, 
and static, unfulfilled, unaware, 
and wavering life style. Once 
again, there is meaning in our 
lives: each in each and one 
together, now 

Anyone concerned about coming 
together for this teaching to do 
Hatha Yoga, may register at the 
Student Union Center (new center) 
table at the scheduled times, or 
call me at 253-2293, and we tan 
arrange a suitable time. Classes 
w ill be throughout the summer and 
will probably continue into the next 
lull year for those who care to 
lurther their practice and learning. 
Therefore, it would be most ef- 
ficacious to begin as early as 
possible and with one group of 
people in a given session. 

Classes have already begun, but 
there is still several openings. 

each session), so to allow a close 
relation between myself and each 
student, and so. too. to develop and 
leel a rhythm and unity within 
each group, together There are no 
age barriers in yoga-there are 
people in our groups ranging from 
twenty to seventy We shall be 
coming together once a week for a 
two hour session consisting of 
pranayama breathing exercises', 
asanas postures', a relaxation 
period, chanting, mind con 
centration exercise- ,and 
meditation A donation of two 
dollars is requested and will be 
graciously accepted. Classes will 
be in my home in the country in 
I'elham. only seven minutes from 
the Amherst an ■ a 



however, was another matter. 
Long lines persisted during the 
morning in the ID photo line. Only 
two persons were there to take 
pictures and handle paperwork for 
those without previous I Mass 
IDs 

According to Robert Swazey. 
Graduate Registrar. "Everyone 
seems to come at 9:00." This 
resulted in some lines early in the 
day. since there were so few 
enrollees. he stated, everything 
went smoothly 

Some of the fringe courses were 
dropped, he said. However, he 
asserted, even though summer 
school is so limited, "many of the 
School of Ed. courses were filled 
early in the day." 

According to Watkins. 
registration will continue until 
Friday. However, most un- 



who 
The 



dergraduate courses were filled in 
the morning. 

She said there was a large rush 
in the morning by students 
were not pre-registered. 
unavailability of application forms 
for summer school caused this, she 
explained Also, this created a gap 
between the scheduling office and 
professors giving courses. 

The largest problems were 
caused by these 250 undergrads. 

Because of the unsureness of how 
many people would be in at- 
tendance, some courses ended up 
being overfilled while others were 
as little as half filled. This has also 
resulted in the wrong amounts of 
textbooks being ordered for many 
courses. One administration 
spokesman stated that most of 
these problems should be cleared 
up within a week or two. 



VILLAGE 
INN 



Amherst Paper to Publish 
Twice A Week 



The Amherst Record, serving 
the area every week since Sep- 
tember. 1844, will be published 
twice a week starting Sunday, July 
9, publisher Michael J. de Sher- 
binin has announced. 

The new issue will be on 
newsstands Sunday and in mail 
subscriber's home Monday. The 
regular Wednesday issue will be 
renamed "Midweek" and con- 
tinued in conjunction with the 
"Dollar Saver," which runs all the 
ads but no news. 

"Amherst is growing, and the 
Record will continue to grow with 
it," said de Sherbinin. "Since 1961 
our circulation has quadrupled and 
the number of pages has increased 
by that ratio, too " 

The Record staff has been 
planning the new addition for 
several months A second edition 
will give us more flexibility in 
presenting news to local readers. 
New features, including many 
. i bout day to-day living, will be 
part of the Sunday edition, said 
the publisher-editor 

The new edition, with a distinc- 
tive heading in color will be 
composed at the Record offices at 
109 Main St and will sell lor 20 
cents, the same price as the 



Midweek edition, witn an in- 
troductory price" of 10 cents 
planned for the first week. 

In the last 11 years the Record 
has won 24 prizes from the New 
England Press Association in 
competition with other weekly 
newspapers, for "general 
excellence", editorials, features, 
sports coverage and various 
phases of advertising. 



JOSHUA 
RIFKIN 

Thursday, July 6 



Leeture/Pemonifratton 

12:30 p.m. 

Campus Center 
Concourse 

8 p.m. 

In Concert 
Bowker Auditorium 



Free Admission 

Seating priority for UAAass 
Summer Students 



DOUBLE FEATURE 



Anthony Quinn 
Jackie Gleason 



Requiem For A 
Heavyweight 



p.m. 



The 
Cardinal 



9p.m. 



Campus Center Auditorium 

Free Admission — UMass Summer StuJents First 



If You Are Arrested - Part II 



THE LAW OF SEARCH AND 
SEI/A HE IS VERY COMPLEX. 
IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU 
REMEMBER AND TBIA YOUR 
LAWYER ALL POSSIBLE 
DETAILS ABOUT ANY SEARCH 
OF YOUR PERSON. PROPERTY, 
OR CAR. 



Your PERSON may be searched 
without your consent or without a 
warrant: 



WHEN you have been arrested. 

Your HOME may be searched 
without your consent or without a 
warrant: 



Crossword Puzzle 



Answer to Monday's Puzzle 



4 
8 

12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
18 
20 

21 
22 
23 



ACROSS 

Uncouth 

person 

Profit 

Beer 

ingredient 

Exist 

Boundary 

Exchange 

premium 

Rodent 

Unfeeling 

Vision 

Prepare for 

print 

Saint (abbr.) 

Cook in fat 

Mohammedan 



3 Hate 

4 Eye (slang) 

5 Scottish for 



prince . 
27 Small rug 

29 Temporary 
bed 

30 Talk idly 

31 Man's 
nickname 

32 Vehicle 

33 Merry 

34 Babylonia, 
deity 

35 Claw 

37 Electrified 
particle 

38 Limb 

39 Ireland 

40 Goal 

41 Printer's 



6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
17 

19 
22 
24 

25 
26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
32 



own 
Piece set in 
In want 
Supremacy 
Mohammedan 
name 

Illuminated 
Pedal digit 
Symbol for 
nickel 
Near 

Preposition 
Parent 
(colloq.) 
Roman road 
Paper 
measure 
Partner 
Winglike 
Container 
Shallow vessel 
Musical 
program 



A 


L 


L PJm 


E 




T 


T 


A L 


L 


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33 
36 
37 

38 
40 
41 
43 
44 



Deity 

Chinese mile 

Guarantee 

against 

Entertains 

Inward 

Teutonic deity 

Preposition 

Twisted 



27 



45 One of 
Columbus' ships 

46 Allowance for 
waste 

47 Doctrine 

48 Born 

49 River in 
Scotland 

50 Hurried 



WHEN you are arrested at 
home. The police may conduct a 
"limited" search of the area where 
you are arrested without a search 
warrant. 

If a policeman wants to come in 
to search your home, you have a 
right to ask to see or hear the 
search warrant to find out what 
parts of the home the officer is 
authorized to search. 

Your CAR may be searched 
without your consent or without a 
search warrant: 

WHEN you are arrested while in 
your car. A "limited" search is 
authorized without a warrant. The 
interpretation of "limited" varies. 

WHEN an officer has probable 
cause to believe that your car is 
transporting contraband or the 
fruits of a crime such as narcotics 
or money from a robbery. 

WHENEVER YOU ARE 
DRIVING A CAR. POLICE HAVE 
A RIGHT BY LAW TO SEE YOUR 
DRIVERS LICENSE AND 
REGISTRATION. IF YOU ARE 
FOUND TO BE DRIVING 
WITHOUT A LICENSE. THE 
POLICE MAY ARREST YOl AT 
ONCE. 

If you object to the search, tell 
the policeman you are not con- 
senting and ask him to identify 
himself. 

WHAT PROCEDURES ARE 
I St ALLY FOLLOWED AFTER 
YOUR ARREST? 



4. You are arraigned at a court 
session, or arrangements are 
made for your release. (You may 
be required to post bond or bail, 
you may be released on personal 
recognizance, or you may be held 
by the police - depending on the 
circumstances of your case.) 

WHAT RIGHTS DO YOl HAVE 
WREN YOU ARE ARRESTED? 



You have a right to know for 
what crime you are arrested. You 
may ask the policeman to tell you. 

You have a right to find out the 
names of the policemen dealing 
with you. Any policeman bv statute 
and custom should identify himself 
upon your lawful request. 

You have a right to use the 
telephone soon after you are 
brought to the police station to call 
your family, a friend, a lawyer, or 
to arrange bail. 

You have a right to hire a 
lawyer. If you cannot afford a 
lawyer you have a right to request 
the court to appoint a lawyer to 
represent you free of charge in any 
felony or misdemeanor case 
carrying a penalty of more than six 
months. You may always ask to 
see a lawyer to determine whether 
you qualify lor a free lawyer. 



R E M E M B E R : C O N - 
SUIT TION XL RIGHTS CAN BE 
WAIVED. BEFORE YOl SAY OR 
SIGN ANYTHING. WEIGH YOUR 
DECISION CAREFULLY. 
WHAT IF YOU ARE 

QUESTIONED? 

The law enforcement 'officer 
questioning you miisfrtell frjbli thpt 
anything you say can' be held 
against you in a court of law. 

You may refuse to answer 
questions and remain silent. 




You may consult with a lawyer 
BEFORE you are questioned 

You may have a lawyer w ith you 
while you are being questioned 



If you cannot afford a lawyer, the 
court must provide one for you 
before you are questioned if you so 
desire. 



You may stop talking at any time 
if you change your mind after you 
have started answering questions. 

You should consider carefully 
whether to answer questions. ()r;il 
statements are as admissible as 
written statements in a court 



See the Lafayette 
Salt Ad in Previous 
Monday Criar 



Astro-Cast 



Pisces is sensitive, prescient, poetic 
and often secretive. When it comes to 
clandestine meetings, Pisces leads the 
way. The Pisces woman is mysterious, 
the Pisces man exudes a quiet kind of sex 
appeal Pisces men and women have a 
way of finding out things, make fine 
detectives, often are writers and can 
create products which have universl 
appeal Many Pisceans seem to be 
psychic so it isn't wise to try to fool 
natives born under this zodiacal sign 
Some famous Pisceans include Elizabeth 
Taylor, Jack Cassidy, Johnny Cash, 

Ana is Nin and Anthony Burgess. 

•«• 

ARIES (March 21 April 19): Lie low 
Play waiting gam-:. Surprise element is 
featured. Publicity accompanies efforts, 
activities. Cancer individual is involved 
Marriage, public relations, partnerships, 
legal affairs all these are spotlighted 

TAURUS (April 20 May 20): Be ver 
satile. Display sense of humor Work 
procedures undergo changes. What was 
routine is transformed. Excitement 
leatured in employment area. Avoid 
extremes where health is concerned 
Check diet. 

GEMINI (May 21 June 20): Affairs Of 
heart take some unusual twists, turns 
Creative endeavors succeed. Startling 
surprise is on agenda. Sagittarian could 
play key role. Be receptive. Welcome 
opportunity for greater freedom of ac 
tion. 

CANCER (June 21 July 22): Some 
persons want to break rules at your 
expense Be flexible, but don't pay for 
mistakes of others. Protect home, 
property and security. Message should 
become increasingly clear Gemini anc 
Virgo are in picture. 

LEO (July 23 Aug 22) Course 
changes. You start in one direction bu' 
finish by going in another, perhaps a 
circle. You meet exciting people ideas 
are bright. You can laugh including 
hilarity caused by your own foibles. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23 Sept 22) What you 
took for granted can be turned into profit 
Look deep for motives. Perceive 
meanings thet may be obscured Deal 
with Pisces individual Financial position 
is subject to sudden change. This works tc 
your ultimate advantage 

LIBRA (Sept 23 Oct 22): Study Virgc 
message Your efforts are spotlighted 
Young persons, romance are in picture 
Personal magnetism soars. Publicity i! 
featured Cycle is high. Take new steps it 
new directions You will win. 

SCORPIO (Oct 23 Nov. 21): Finish 
projects. Enlarge circle of acquain 
tances. Be independent without being 
arrogant You get offer based on wider 
recognition. What was blocked or 
restricted now can be released. You 
receive privileged information. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 Dec. 21): 
Friends now act in unusual, perhaps 
eccentric manner Important that you 
adhere to individual style. Your own 
ideas can be developed. Stand tall for 
principles Compromise now would be 
foolish. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 Jan. 19): You 
get more money for handling additional 
responsibility Dealings indicated with 
one born under Cancer. Your position is 
elevated. You gain prestige. Shake off 
tendency to try going in more than one 
direction simultaneously. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 Feb. 18): Good 
lunar aspect now coincides with journeys, 
with your ideas heing distributed, ex 
plained and examined, influence ex 
pands. More persons express interest In 
your goals, aspirations. Meaningful 
social contact is on agenda. 

PISCES (Feb. 19 March 20): Secrets, 
clandestine arrangements art featured 
Steer clear of "office politics." One who 
h ■ -> innocent look may have rather 
malicious motives. Know it and protect 
yourself in clinches. Check accounts. 

IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY you 
are the kind of individual who gets things 
done, who fulfills obligations and keeps 
promises. July should be your most 
significant month this year You have 
some important dealings upcoming with 
Cap: icorn Trust innate business 
acumen. 



Paqo Eight — University ol Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JUNE 29, 1972 



Movie, T.V. Highlights, Theatre 



THEATER 

The Wind in the Willows", 10:30 
a.m., Mt. Holyoke College, now 
through Sunday,. 

"Jesus Christ Superstar", 
Storrowton Theater, West 

Springfield, Thurs., Fri., 8:30; Sat. 7, 
1015. 

"You're A Good Man, Charlie 
Brown", Mt. Holyoke Theater, July 
4 8, 8:30 p.m. 

"Last of the Red Hot Lovers", 
Storrowton, West Springfield, July 3 
9, 8:30; July 10, 9 p.m. 



MOVIES 
Academy — Northampton 

"Klute" 7:05 "Summer of 42" 9:10 
Calvin — Northampton 
"101 Dalmatians" 1:307:00 
"Swiss Family Robinson" 2:50 8:25 
Amherst Cinema — 

"Skyjacked" 7 & 9 
Campus Center — Hadley 
"French Connection" 7:00 
"MASH" 9:00 
Campus Cinema 1 — Hadley 
"French Connection" 7:00 
MASH" 9:00 
Campus Cinema 2 - Hadley 

"Clockwork Orange" 7:00 9:15 
Campus Cinema 3 — Hadley 

"Swinging Stewardesses" 7 & 9 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 1 — Nor- 
thampton 

The Cowboys" 2:008:00 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 2 — Nor- 
thampton 

The Omega Man" 7:15 
"Man in the Wilderness" 1:45 9:00 
Showcase — West Springfield 
"Fiddler on the Roof" 800 
Showcase — West Springfield 

The War Between Men & Women" 
2 00 7:40 9:50 
Showcase — West Springfield 

Portnoy'S Complaint" 2:007:30- 
V 40 
Showcase — West Springfield 

Fuzz" 2 007:309:30 
Showcase — West Springfield 

The Godfather" 2:005:158:30 
Hadley Dnven-ln — 

Klute" "Summer of 42" at dusk 
Maiestic — Easthampton 

Fistful of 44's" & "Baby Vickie" 
Deerfield Drive-In — 

tanley" & "Young Graduates" 

Red Rock Drive-In Easthampton 

Stanley" & "Young Graduates" 



CC Auditorium 

Tuesday, "Requiem 
Heavyweight" 7 
"The Cardinal" 9 



for 



TV HIGHLIGHTS 
Movies 
Thursday, June 29 

9:30 a.m. "Carpet of Horror" - 
Mystery (Channel 8) 
10:00 a.m. "The Big Beat" Musical 
(3) 
12:00 noon "Payroll" Drama (27) 

630 p.m. "Captain Blackjack" - 
Adventure (27) 

9:00 p.m. "the Tiger Makes Out" - 
Comedy (3, 7, 10) 

1030 p.m. "The Gambler" Drama 
(27) 

11:30 p.m. "Love is Better Than 
Ever" Comedy (3, 7) 
Friday, June 30 

1:05 a.m. "Ride a Crooked Trail" - 
Western (4) 

1:10 a.m. "Holiday for Sinners" - 
Drama (3) 

9:30 a.m. "Brennus, Enemy of 
Rome" Adventure (8) 
1000 a.m. "Bright Road" Drama 
(3) 

12:00 noon "The Eve of St. Mark" 
Drama (27) 

6:30 p.m. "The Crooked S y" 
Mystery (27) 

8:30 p.m. "Johnny Tiger" Drama 



(4) 




8:30 p.m. 


"Isadora" • Biography 


(20, 22, 30) 




8:30 p.m. 


"Two Daughters" - 



Comedy-Drama (24, 57) 

9:00 p.m. "Heat of Anger" - Drama 
(3, 7, 10) 

10:30 p.m. "Monkey in Winter" - 
Comedy (27) 

11:30p.m. "Kenner" Adventure (3) 
11:30 p.m. "Picture Mommy Dead" - 
Suspense (7) 
Saturday, July 1 

1:30 a.m. "X the Unknown" 
Science Fiction (3) 2:00 p.m. "The 
Eagle and the Hawk" Adventure (5) 

2:00 p.m. "What Price Glory" 
Adventure (7) 

2:00 p.m. "Musketeers of the Sea" - 
Adventure (8) 

2:00 p.m. "Reptilicus" Science 
Fiction (10) 

200 p.m. "Ghost Town" Western 

(40) 

230 p.m. "Duel in the Jungle" 
Adventure (3) 
3 30 p.m. "Dark Corner" 

Melodrama (40) 



4:30p.m. "Glory Alley" Drama (4) 

4:30 p.m. "Tarzan and the Leopard 
Woman" Adventure (7) 

5:00 p.m. "Monster from the Surf" - 
Drama (10) 

8:30 p.m. "Dating Game" - Ad- 
venture (40) 

9:00 p.m. "Beau Geste" - Adventure 
(4) 

9:00 p.m. "Isadora" - Part II - 
Biography (20, 22, 30) 
11:25 p.m. "Merry Andrew" 
Comedy (3) 

11:30 p.m. "A Breath of Scandal" - 
Drama (5) 

11:30 p.m. "The Terrornauts" 
Science Fiction (7) 
11:30p.m. "Winchester 73" Western 
(10) 

11:30 p.m. "Union Pacific" Comedy 
(22) 

11:30 p.m. "The Mad Ghoul" 
Melodrama (30) 



Sunday, July 2 

1:00 a.m. "Tight Little Island" - 
Comedy (4) 

1:30 a.m. "Trap for Seven Spies" 
Drama (3) 

12:00 noon "Ivanhoe" Adventure (4) 
12:00 noon "Carribean" Adventure 
(5) 

12:00 noon "The Glenn Miller Story" 
Biography (7) 

1:30 p.m. "The Young and The 
Brave" Drama (3) 

2.00 p.m. "Les Girls" - Musical (5) 
2:00 p.m. "Fog for a Killer" . - 
Mystery (8) 

200 p.m. "The Unearthly" 
Melodrama (40) 

3:15 p.m. "Missile to the Moon" 
S:ience Fiction (8) 

3: 15 p.m. "The Enchanted Forest" - 
Drama (40) 

3:30 p.m. "Jalopy" Comedy (5) 

4:30 p.m. "The Terror" 
Melodrama (10) 

4:30 p.m. "Captain January" 
Drama (27) 

600 p.m. "The One Thousand Eyes 
of Dr. Mabuse" Mystery (5) 

6:30 p.m. "River of Gold" - Ad 
venture (5) 

7:00 p.m. "Kill the Umpire" - 

Comedy (18) 

7:30 p.m. "A Fine- Madness" - 

Drama (3, 7, 10) 

9:00 p.m. "Modesty Blaise" - 

Comedy (5, 8, 40) 

11:05 p.m. "The Great Imposter" 

Biography (3) 



11:15 p.m. "Kenner" Adventure (7) 

11:30 p.m. "Soldiers Three" - 

Comedy (4) 

12:00 midnight "The Swinger" - 

Comedy (5) 

12:00 midnight "Guadalcanal Diary" 

Drama (40) 
Monday, July 3 

9:30 a.m. "Siege of Fort Bismark" - 
Drama (8) 

10:00 a.m. "The Magnificant 
Yankee" Biography (3) 
12:00 noon "The Frightened City" - 
Drama (27) 

6:00 p.m. "Never Trust a Gambler" 
Drama (18) 

6:30 p.m. "Stage Door Canteen" - 
Musical (27) 

7:00 p.m. "Kismet" Musical (3) 

9:00 p.m. "Rapture" Drama (5, 8, 
40) 

10:30 p.m. "Relax, Freddie" 
Comedy (27) 

11:30 p.m. "Cry of the Haunted" - 
Drama (3, 7) 



Tuesday, July 4 

1:05a.m. "Star Spangled Rhythm" - 
Musical Comedy (4) 

9:30a.m. "Hercules and the Captive 
Women" Adventure (8) 
10:00 a.m. "Stars and Stripes 
Forever" Biography (3) 
12:00 noon "Captain Blackjack" 
Adventure (27) 

6:00 p.m. "The Pathfinder" - Ad 
venture (18) 

6:30 p.m. "Alexander's Ragtime 
Band" Musical (27') 

8:30 p.m. "The Sixth Sense" 
Mystery (5, 8, 40) 
11:30 p.m. "An American in Paris" 
Musical (3, 7) 



Wednesday, July 5 

1:05 a.m. "Everything but the 
Truth" Comedy (4) 

9:30 a.m. "The Secret of the Sphinx" 
Adventure (8) 
10:00 a.m. "Calling Bulldog 
Drummond" Mystery (3) 

6:0Q p ,m, ^ "Prince of Pirates" - 

9:00 p\w"*TTwf > 5even Little Foys" 
Musical 440) 

10:30 p.m. "P ink String and Sealing 
Wax" Mystery (27) 
11:30 p.m. "Night into Morning" - 
Drama (3, 7) 



Cleveland vs. 



Orioles vs. 



International 



Sports 
Friday, June 30 

7:30 p.m. Baseball: Cleveland In- 
dians vs. Yankees (18) 
Saturday, July 1 

1:00 p.m. Baseball: Milwaukee vs. 
Boston (18, 20) 

2:00 p.m. Baseball: 
Yankees 

2:15 p.m. Baseball 
Tigers 

Sunday, July 2 
12:00 noon AAU 
Champions (10) 

1:00 p.m. Indians vs. Yankees (18, 
20) 

1:30 p.m. Mets vs. Expos (10) 

<g>:00 p.m. Brewers vs. Red Sox (4, 
22) 

2:30 p.m. Indy 500 Highlights (30) 

3:00 p.m. AAU International 
Champions (3, 7) 

3:30 p.m. World Championship 
Tennis Tournament (20, 30) 

4:00 p.m. Tennis (10) 

4:30 p.m. Tennis (3, 7) 

4:30 p.m. U.S. Women's Open Golf 
Tournament (5, 8, 40) 
Tuesday, July 4 

1:00 p.m. Pirates vs. Mets (8, 10) 

4:30 p.m. Pocono Auto Race ( 18) 

6:00 p.m. Rodeo (24, 57) 

8:00 p.m. Canadian Pro Football 
(18) 



Specials 
Thursday, June 29 

830 p.m. Portrait of Helen Hayes 
(24, 57) 
Friday, June 30 

7:30 p.m. Seven Days Journey: 
Special Projects. A look at 3 mo. old 
babies learning to swim. (5) 
11:30 p.m. Impact 72: Education (4) 
Monday, July 3 

8:00 p.m. Marxist Chile (5, 8, 40) 

8:00 p.m. Roberta Flack (57) 

8:30p.m. Circus Parade Review (24, 
57) 

10:00 p.m. Salute to Oscar Ham 
merstein II (3, 7, 10) 
Tuesday, July 4 

8:30a.m. Mormon Tabernacle Choir 
(8) 

3:00 p.m. Great Circus Parade (4, 
57) 

8:00 p.m. Independence Day 
Specials (24, 57) 

9:30 p.m. Independence Day 
Specials (4, 20, 30) 




Summer Students, 



Come Join Us 

(We need you) 



Room 1 27 Student Activities Area 
Campus Center , First Level 



Office Hours 9-5 
Become Sensuous! 



Pianist Rifkin On Campus Today 




Joshua Rifkin, a ragtime pianist, 
will visit the UMass campus today 
and give a lecture and demon- 
stration on the Campus Center 
Concourse at 12:30 P.M. and a 
concert in Bowker Auditorium 
tonight at 8. 

Rifkin was born in New York in 
1944. His teachers included David 
Labovitz in piano, and Vincent 
Persichetti and Karlheinz 
Stockhausen in composition. He 
holds degrees in composition from 
the Juilliard School of Music and in 
musicology from Princeton 
University ; he has also studied at 
New York University. In Europe, 
he attended the International 
Vacation Courses for New Music in 
Darmstadt. and Gottir.gen 
University as a Fulbright Scholar. 
His music has been performed in 
America and abroad. 

In recordings for Nonesuch, 
Rifkin has conducted repertoire 
ranging from the 15th century to 
the 20th. Recordings for Elektra 
include The Baroque Beatles Book 
and numerous arrangements for 
Judy Collins, among them those on 
her album Wildflowers. He has 
been Musical Director of Nonesuch 
Records and recently joined the 
faculty of Brandeis University 

Rifkin began to piay ragtime and 
classic jazz at the age of ten, 
before he was thirteen, his playing 
won the approval of several sur- 



vivors of the early New Orleans 
and Chicago jazz worlds. His initial 
recording for Elektra was as a 
member of the Even Dozen Jug 
Band, and he has maintained his 
involvement with jazz and rag 
music through occasional ap- 
pearances as a performer. 

Rifkin. writing for Nonesuch 
Records, had this to say about 
ragtime music: 

"Late in the 1890s, a craze for 
anew kind of music called ragtime 
swept over America. The instant 
popularity of ragtime increased 
with the advent of the new century, 
thrilling some observers of 
American culture, alarming 
others. By 1910, the mania had 
reached its peak and a decline set 
in. and the outbreak of the First 
World War-signaled the end of the 
ragtime era. Elements of the 
music, however, remained alive in 
jazz and in popular dance, theater, 
and movie music, and traces of 
ragtime remain in American 
vernacular music of our own dav. 



"The ultimate diffusion of 
ragtime mirrored its origins. 
Nurtured primarily by a large 
corps of itinerant black pianists in 
the Midwest, ragtime synthesized 
diverse musical strands-marching- 
band music. Euro-American 
dances such as the polka, 
quadrille, and schottisch, sen- 




Julv I, W72 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume I. Issue :i 



The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Student Coop Planned 
By Chiller, Booker 



By KARIMU (KRAI'S 

The Student Co-op as pictured by 
student senators Robert A. Chiller 
and Dave Booker is still in the 
planning stage. According to them, 
a number of legal difficulties in 
addition to administrative and 
practical problems exist. The 
experience with co-ops in other 
universities in contradictory, they 
said yesterday in a Crier in- 
terview. Harvard University has 
lost money with its co-op, partly 
due to rip-offs, but Berkeley and 
Brown have succeeded, Booker 
explained. He has written letters to 
these universities to find out how 
they work their co-ops. 

Chiller came up with the idea 



about four months ago. when he 
realized that a large state 
university, especially one situated 
in a 'five-college area should have a 
co op, based mostly on the fact that 
certain merchandise was not 
available at the bookstore, and the 
prices in town were too high for 
those goods. 

The co-op will be offering hi- 
quality stereo equipment, bicycles, 
ski equipment, refrigerators, in 
short, "goods not offered by the 
University Store." The co-op will 
not, Chiller says, compete with the 
bookstore and will be administered 
by the Student Senate. After going 
through Whitmore procedures, 
having space in the Campus Center 



approved by the SUG Board, and 
the rest of the usual red-tape, the 
Senate will have to approve the 
budget for the co-op. which would 
be a sizeable amount Chiller said. 
If this happens, he went on, 
students will find in the fall a co-op 
operated as a service. Such as the 
Student Senate Transit Service. It 
will be. declared Chiller, "the first 
stage to take over the University". 
He explained that if the co-op is 
successful, a credit union and other 
additional services might be 
established. The co-op organizers 
are open to suggestions on what to 
sell. If you have any ideas, they 
may be left in the Student Senate 
office. 



Eclipse Due Monday 



NEW YORK — A thousand-mile- 
an-hour shadow will sweep the 
earth Monday, the mark of an 
eclipse of the sun. 

The shadow will dip down at the 
Sakhalin Islands off northern 
Japan, then race across the coast 
of Siberia, northern Alaska, 
Canada and the Maritime 
Provinces. 

All of the rest of the United 
States, except Hawaii, will be 
able— weather permitting— to see 
a partial eclipse. 

Watching from the sidewalks of 
New York City a viewer may be 
able to see 79.5 per cent of the sun 
darkened. From Chicago, 63 per 



cent will be covered ; from Denver, 
36 per cent; from San Francisco, 14 
per cent. 

In New York, the eclipse will 
begin, according to the American 
Museum-Hayden Planetarium, at 
3:22:45.3 p.m. Eastern Daylight 
Time, reach its maximum at 
4:42:11.9 and end at 5:45:11.0. 

Because the eclipse will be 
partial for viewers in the 48 con- 
tiguous states, millions will be 
exposed to the dangers of looking 
at the sun with the naked eye. 

While scientists will be aboard 
jet planes chasing the shadow to 
lengthen the precious few seconds 
that the eclipse is total, only one 
second of carelessness on earth in 



watching the sun could produce 
permanent blindness. 

"Looking at the unshielded face 
of the sun with the naked eye or 
through any optical device, such as 
the viewfinder of a camera, can 
seriously damage the eye," says a 
warning from the Eastman Kodak 
Co. 

A person must use a filter to look 
directly at the sun, Kodak says— a 
filter that will not only reduce the 
visible energy of the sun but will 
also reduce sufficiently the in- 
visible ultraviolet and infrared 
radiation which can cause instant 
eye damage, including blindness, 
without the person being aware of 
it. 



timental songs, salon music- 
binding them together with the 
vital syncopated rhythms in- 
digenous to black music in Africa, 
the Caribbean, and the United 
States The first published rag 
came from the pen of a white 
imitator-bandmaster William H. 
Krell, whose Mississippi Rag of 
1897 nevertheless reveals a close 
study of the true creators of this 
music-but black composers soon 
made their way into print as well 
and received much of their rightful 
due 

"Ragtime grew up in cafes, 
saloons, and what the period 
referred to as sporting houses. The 
Midwest of the *90's retained much 
of its frontier origins, and the 
flourishing tenderloins provided a 
haven tor the early ragtime 
pianists, whose music hovered just 
below the border of respectability. 
To some, however, ragtime meant 
more than merely the sonic 
tapestry of the red-light district or 
a showplace for keyboard 
prowess: they saw the possibility 
of its escaping from its en- 
vironment and becoming a 
medium of serious composition. 
None maintained this vision of a 
highly evolved, "classic" ragtime 
with greater devotion than a young 
black musician named Scott 
Joplin. Through ceaseless labor 
and considerable genius, he suc- 
ceeded in transforming the rough 
vibrancy of his forebears into a 
subtle and polished art. 



Mahavishnu 
Here Monday 

Tne University will welcome Monday the immense talent of The 
Mahavishnu Orchestra at 6:30 P.M. on the Metawampe Lawn (SU 
Ballroom if rain). With a mixture of jazz, rock and classical finesse, 
Mahavishnu evokes sounds uncommon in any aspect of contemporary 
music. Their use of complicated progressions, odd time signatures and 
exquisite harmony of improvisation lends itself to support the awe- 
inspiring reviews all have given them. 

Sri Chinmoy is McLaughlin's spiritual master-discussion of 
McLaughlin's beliefs and spiritual being cannot be separated from 
mention of his music for he is attempting, if he has not in fact already 
succeeded, to fuse his beliefs with his music. This spiritual energy is felt 
in nil of McLaughlin's work, whether it is acoustic or electric. His music 
is an amalgam of his past and present experience, a synthesis of all mvsff 
forms: jazz, rock, the blues, classical and non-western--a synthesis, not a 
pastiche. 

John' was born in Yorkshire. England, in 1942. Through h,s mother, who 
was a violinist and a lover of music, he became interested in classical 
music and began to play the violin and piano when he was se\ <. a. 1 in n hv 
began u listen to Jazz on t£*t Philharmonic records and people like 
Barney Kessel and Tal Farlow . Farlow made a strong impression on him 
-so dMMiles after his first hearing of "Milestones." He quit school, took a 
job at a music instrument shop and began sitting in with jazz groups when 
he was sixteen During the late fifties, on weekends, John would hitch the 
200 miles to Manchester to listen to visiting Spanish guitarists at a guitar 
club and to hear other music. 

After Deuchar, John played with other groups, including the Graham 
Bond Organization (Bond, McLaughlin Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker) 
Herbie Goines and the Nighttimers, and Brian Auger's quintet. 

In addition to playing and recording with the Lifetime, John did a lint 
with Miles and is featured on the records "In a Silent Way" and "Bitches 
Brew " His first album for Douglas. "Devotion." was released during the 
summer of 1970: his second, "My Goal's Beyond," was released one \ ear 
later. 

McLaughlin then formed the Mahavishnu Orchestra which played ••in- 
extended summer engagement at the Gaslight in New York before 
recording "The Inner Mounting Flame" on Columbia. In addition to 
McLaughlin, the musician's who make up the Mahavishnu Orchestra are 
Jerry Goodman, violin; Jan Hammer, keyboards; Billy Cobham per 
cussion and Rick Laird, bass. 

Jan Hammer, keyboards, was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia Winn 
he was 14, he formed a group with Miraslav Vitous (of Weather Re|>ort >. 
Jan played with various groups, touring Europe, and studied at the 
Prague Academy of Music Arts before leaving Czechoslovakia for the 
States. He was with Sarah Vaughn, Elvin Jones and Jeremy Steig before 
joining the Mahavishnu Orchestra. 

Jerry Goodman, violin, was born and raised in Chicago. He attended 
Southern Illinois University, studied violin, (both his mother and father 
are professional violinists) and played in concerts and recitals. After 
performing before several rock audiences, he joined The Flock. Jerry 
first recorded with McLaughlin on "My Goal's Beyond." 

Richard ( Rick > Laird, bass, was born in Dublin, Ireland. Growing up in a 
home where music was always heard, Rick played guitar in his spare 
time. He became interested in the bass and soon gave it his full attention 
He lived in New Zealand, moved to Sydney. Australia after becoming a 
fulltime musician. He later returned to Ireland, then left for London when 
Brian Auger asked him to be part of his trio. Rick came to the States in '66 
after winning a scholarship to the Berklee School of Music and toured 
with Buddy Rich in '69 and '70. He was living in London when McLaughlin 
called, asking him to join the Mahavishnu Orchestra. 

William (Billy) Cobham, Jr., percussion, was born in Panama; his 
family moved to New York City when he was three. Billy began playing 
drums in grammar school and attended Music and Arts High School, 
where he further developed his interest in percussion. After a stint in th< 
army, he joined Billy Taylor. After Taylor, he played with Horace Silver. 
Miles Davis. Carla Thomas, Roberta Flack. James Brown, and Joined 
Dream* before first recording with McLaughlin on "My Goal's BeyOi i 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY «, m 2 



r 




The Crier is a semi-weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in th« Campus Center, 
Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for the contents^ No 
copy is censored by the administration before Publication. Represented for 
national advertising by National Educational Advertising Serv.ces, Inc. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



FINE ARTS 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

Elleni Koch 

Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 



Art Buchwald 



THURSDAY. JULY 6, 1972 



You Can't Go Home 



l 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



J 



Campus Carousel 

Lampoon, Money 

By TONY GRANITE 
THE HARVARD LAMPOON editors have selected Cosmopolitan 
Magazine to parody, this Fall. .^^nt^nf 

"We're doing it because it's a very funny magazine and in the context oi 
women's liberation, very sexist and chauvinist." 

Other recent parodies: Playboy, Time and Life. 

MONEY IS THE ROOT OF THE EVIL TIMES befalling The Daily 
Reporter of Mankato (Minn.) State, according to continuing coverage of 
recent issues. Seems that the campus newspaper is in the hole to the tune 
of $12,000. The editors charge "inadequate budget of the Allocations 

Committee." . . _. ... u 

Contributing to the dilemma is the decrease in budget resulting when a 

plan was presented two years ago to become fiscally independent m the 

face of an $18,00 loan to be repaid to the Committee. 
Current deficits are forcing the newspaper to dissolve its commercial 

production shop, discontinue wire services, and cutback in number of 

pages published. 



**** 



PRESS PROBLEMS ABOUND-as witness the recriminations rampant on 
the Middle Tennessee State campus, where the faculty advisor to the 
yearbook has been charged with "censorship". 

Seems that, without consulting the student editor, said adviser 
removed a page from the book when proofs were returned to him by the 
printer for checMng. The editor discovered the change when the 
published book was delivered. • , 

The offending page-»o the adviser-was the reproduction of an editorial 
page of the campus njwspaper, sidelines, concerned with a controversy 
of the college president wii h the State Board of Education. 

The adviser explained that he thought the editorial concerned a period 
of the year that shouldn't go into a permanently bound volume which 
would be a reminder to the students of the incident. 



WASHINGTON-The Old 
Democratic Pros were sitting in a 
smoke-filled room. No one was 
smiling. 

"Is anyone here going to 
Miami?" 

There was silence. 

"I ran for delegate," one pol 
said, "but I was beaten by a kid 
who plays drums with a rock group 
called the 'Meat Grinders.' " 

"Huh, I ran for delegate and was 
beaten by a 19-year-old girl who 
turned out to be a guy, after the 
votes were counted." 

"I've been going to Democratic 
conventions for 30 years, 20 of them 
as chairman of my delegation," a 
white-haired pro said. "I've given 
my all to the party. There isn't a 
judge in my state who doesn't owe 
his job to me. There isn't a federal 
marshal or a postmaster who can't 
say Big Al wasn't the greatest 
friend he ever had. When the 
people wanted roads, they came to 
me; when they wanted housing, 
Big Al was there; when they 
wanted a little something to tide 
them over, they knew my door was 
never closed. This time, when it 
came to choosing a delegate to the 
convention, what did they do? They 
elected a black woman jockey." 

"Jeez, Al! It's not going to be the 
same Demcratic convention 
without us." 

"What happened to all of us?" a 
bold, florid man asked. "What 
happned?" 

"I'll tell you what happened!" a 
man with a diamond stickpin in his 
tie shouted. "We did it to our- 
selves!" 

"How's that, Charley?" someone 
asked. 



"Remember when the kids were 
acting up and raising hell around 
the country?" 

"Who doesn't?" 

"Remember what we told them? 
We told them instead of demon- 
strating in the streets and closing 
down the schools that they should 
work within the system." 




"That's right," Big Al said. "I 
remember myself saying this 
country was so designed that you 
could get anything you wanted by 
working within the system." 

"Well, that's what the little 
stinkers did. They decided to work 
within the system, and now we're 
out on our butts." 

"But we didn't really mean for 
them to work within the system," 
the bald man said. "That was just 
a figure of speech-like 'Have a 
nice day' or 'Give my best to your 
wife.' " 



"Of course we didn't mean it," 
someone else said. "We meant 
they should work within the 
system, but do it by working for 
us." 

"Gentlemen," Charley said. 
"Our biggest mistake was not that 
we told them to work within the 
system, but that we never knew 
what the system was all about. Not 
one man in this room ever 
dreamed someone else could use 
the system as we did-to control the 
party." 

"Well," said one pol, "I think it's 
a pretty lousy system if anyone can 
take it over just because he has 
more votes." 

"You're damn right it is," said 
Big Al. "If I had known what they 
had on their minds, I would have 
advised them to go into the streets 
and have their heads bashed in!" 

"The thing to do now," one pol 
said, "is to change the system so it 
can't happen again." 

"It's too late," said Charley, 
"they have control of the party, the 
convention and the system." 

"Well," said Big Al, "we can't sit 
around here blowing cigar smoke 
at each other. What do we do?" 

"This is what we do," Charley 
said. "We go down to Miami next 
week and demonstrate." 

"We can't even get into the 
convention hall," a pol protested. 

"In the streets, dummy," 
Charley said, "in the streets." 

Copyright 1972, Los Angeles 
Times 



Open Letter To Doctor Gluckstern, Provost 



Dear Doctor Gluckstern: 

The teacher evaluation program has been 
the central concern of the Academic Affairs 
Committee for over two years. Tom Filmore 
began the operation which is now in our 
care. The Committee feels obliged to insure 
the success of the program by all means 
possible. We are committed to teacher 
evaluation and improvement, for this is the 
area which affects each student's education. 
There are two reasons why an effective 
teacher evaluation program can not be run 
and should not be run by students. The first 
is the lack of credibility with the faculty. 
Although we could begip an operation 
similar to this one, the only people that the 
faculty will have faith in are people like 
themselves. The second reason is the dif- 
ficulty in providing continuity. Students are 
concerned about being students, not about 
being administrators or professionals. 

As you have suggested many times, 
faculty members must believe in the 
evaluations in order for them to be of ser- 
vice. The representatives of the Office of 
Teacher Evaluation must engender the trust 
of those who they must serve, that ! j the 
faculty and the s idents. The students 
realize the need for a professional staff and 
the faculty will respect no one but a 
professional staff. But beyond that, the 
evaluations must have impact; they must 
get at the root of the problems and help 
improve them. If they do not have the im- 
pression of being professional, of being 
accurate, .then they can easily be 
disregarded by faculty members who refuse 
to admit to bad teaching. When we ad- 
ministered our program we were viewed as 
students at play; many used our facilities 
because they were free and could ignore the 
results if they so wished. We could not force 
them to recognize the professional aspects 
of our operation, nor could we demand 
manditory evaluations. Those resources 
were not at our disposal. 

The teacher evaluation field is complex 
and time consuming. In order to compose 
evaluative instruments, to write programs 
to analyze the results from those in- 
struments, and to help faculty make use of 
the results which will eventually lead to the 
improvement of teaching takes a time 
commitment which is beyond the reach of 
most students. This is not to say that we are 
uncommitted but rather that fit are at the 



University for only four years and do not 
have the time nor the energy to devote to 
another profession besides our studies. We 
should not have to maintain the programs 
which we start, especially those programs 
which the institution itself should provide. 
Tom Filmore and the Committee succeeded 
in developing a University-wide system of 
teacher evaluation. They administered the 
form and processed the results. But they 
could not continue to maintain such an 
Office because too much time would be 
spent in teaching other students to take over 
for them when they left. Filmore s major 
thrusts were aimed at making the ad- 
ministration and the faculty recognize the 
value of a teacher evaluation-improvement 
program. This he succeeded in doing. It is 
my feeling that the administration and the 
faculty would not now be seriously con- 
sidering teacher evaluation had it not been 
for Tom Filmore and the Academic Affairs 
Committee. He did what students do best. 
They realize a need for something within the 
institution and then set about proving that it 
can operate and perform the functions 
which they want it to do. It is then in- 
cumbent upon the institution to make the 
operation a permanent one which serves the 
community. It is not incumbent upon the 
students to constantly sustain the operation. 
We both know of the response of the 
faculty to teacher evaluation and I sym- 
pathize with your less authoritarian ap- 
roach to creating a University-wide 
teacher evaluation program. But the time 
has come to consider student reaction to 
delays. Teaching on this campus needs 
improvement but improvement has been 
filibustered in committee after committee. 
Your pledges of support for the program 
seem as mere lip service to its success when 
one realizes that at the present rate it will be 
a year and a half before we have a director 
for the Office. 

In early December of 1970 you created the 
first teacher evaluation committee which 
was composed of eight faculty members, 
two graduate students, and two un- 
dergraduate students; they comprised the 
Ad Hoc Committee on Teacher Evaluation. 
Your words at that time were: It is the 
feeling of this Office that a new University- 
wide committee including both graduate 
and undergraduate students be established 
to attempt to address itself to specific 



recommendations to guide the ad- completes will be used in personnel 
ministration in dealing with the question of decisions. Good teachers yet remain 
teacher evaluation and the role of teaching unrecognized and unrewarded at the 
generally on this campus. The Committee department level as can be illustrated most 
reported out in September of this part year; .vividly by the Mike Best case. Student m- 
although they did devote themselves to a 'terests are ignored time and again. You 
University-wide program and an Office of yourself seem more concerned about the 



Teacher Evaluation and Improvement, they 
filed to address the problem of publication, 
or to be more specific, the use of the results 
in personnel decisions and by students in 
choosing courses and professors. Later, 
when the discussion became campus wide at 
the Undergraduate Education Conference, 
the departments and the Student Senate, the 
use of the Illinois Questionnaire or any other 
University-wide form came under question. 
In response to these attacks the ad- 
ministration refused to impose a single form 
on the departments and left the entire 
matter in the hands of the departments. You 
did, in response to the request of the 
Academic Affairs Committee and the 
Student Senate, create another teacher 
evaluation committee which would guide 
the Provost's Office and the director of that 
Office of Teacher Evaluation in ad- 
ministering the program. That committee 
was never convened until late March and 
has had only two meetings this year. It has 
had no time to pick a director or even an 
acting director and on the face of it the 
committee would seem to be a farce. There 
is now no hope of obtaining a director for 
September of this year and it is very 
possible that there will be no permanent 
director appointed until September of 1973. 
Without a director there is no chance that 



faculty reactions to the program than in 
making sure that teaching is improved and 
that teacher evaluation is a respected form 
of student input into personnel decisions. 

I recommend the following be done im- 
mediately : 

1. The departments be directed to con 
struct forms which are machine scorable 
inorder that the results can be placed in an 
easily readable form. 

2. That all the forms be within certain 
limitations so that comparisons will I 
possible. 

3. That the University Teacher Evaluation I 
Committee be convened within two weeks It 
has not met since May and there are a 
number of issues which must be confronted. | 

4. That the Search Committee for a 
Director be established immediately ana 
that no less than 50% of the membership be 
students. They should set as a target date j 
January for finding a director. 

5. The departments should be informed! 
that the results of the evaluations should M 
placed in such a manner that publication wr 



......„-» - — ■■■»■ i..w»- io m i ii. iii. < uiai Diaceu 111 SUCH a mo"»v "-- -r- W-..IA ka 

the quality of evaluation will improve and the results can be facilitated. This snouiu »*, 



we will have to allow the new director at 
least two semesters to establish some sort of 
program. With all that taken into con- 
sideration, it will be September of 1974 
before an efficient program is off the 
ground; almost four years after the initial 
committee and five years after Filmore 
began organizing the Academic Affairs 



done beginning 
evaluations. 



with the Spring 



The reasons for my requesting that thel 
above be done should be obvious, we teeii 
that the Provost's Office has not been «| 
responsive to student needs as it couia dct 
We feel that we have acted in good faitn. wtr 



Teacher Evaluation Program. I find the began the program; you assured us oiyu 

time delay distressing. personal commitment to the program a 

With the process that is now in effect, now we feel as though we have been had. 
students have no way of finding the good 
instructors beyond the grapevine method 

presently employed. Department forms Peac f" 

vary to such degree that any sort of com- Nicholas Apostoiai 

parison is meaningless. The student can not chairman] 

even be sure that the evaluations she or he Committee on Academic Affair* 




BOOB moQ 




"This is OUR twenty two million dollar Campus Center?" 

J.O.E. Program Seeks Volunteers 



The Crier — Universify of Massachusetts — Page Three 

Continuing Ed Offers 
Body Training 

The Division of Continuing Education at UMass has announced a three- 
week workshop in Body .Movement Training, taught by Amherst 
resident, Lyn Singer. The course will be conducted in the Women's 
Physical Education building from July 10 through 28, from 2:30-4.00 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 

The course, orginally designed as part of an actor-training program, 
provides a creative, releasing, and enjoyable program of exercise and 
body awareness. The underlying premise is that natural, relaxes 
movemet can happen only after ridding one's body of unneccessary 
tensions. Throughout the course, individual as well as group exercises 
will be conducted. Though not a sensitivity or encounter group, this kind 
of workshop is useful in such work since the class fosters a high degree of 
mutual dependence and group cohesiveness. 

Lyn Singer is an Oberlin College student majoring in communications 
and theatre arts. She has worked in theatre since high school and has 
been particularly active in the summer program in Amherst, which has 
been in operation since 1967. Lyn is now on the board of directors for the 
program this summer and will act as movement coach for the produc- 
tions. 

In January, 1971, Miss Singer attended workshops in gymnastics, stage 
fencing, and sta fe e movement in conjunction with a production of The 
Taming of the Shrew at Oberlin. January, 1972, was spent in London, 
studying body movement with a professional teacher of movement who 
works with many of the London experimental theatre companies. 

The workshop is co-educational and open to all men and women from 
high school age on up. Further questions concerning the program may be 
addressed to the Division of Continuing Education... 545-2591 (Campus 
Center). 



Juvenile Opportunity Extension 
(JOE.) is looking for volunteers 
to work with kids and staff at and 
away from the Westfield Detention 
Center according to a program 
release. There are many things a 
volunteer can do but the critical 
question of transportation 
remains, it said. A volunteer with a 
car or access to a car is of the 
highest value to the overall effect. 
"After transportation gets cleared 
away you can consider these 
general areas of volunteer work," 
they said. 

JOE. sponsored a month long 
program last January where youth 
who were the responsibility of the 
Department of Youth Services 
lived on a one-to-one basis with 
students at UMass. Approximately 
100 students were involved, many 
of which were regular J.O.E. 
volunteers. 

Volunteers from the University 
interested in work with kids have 
been going to the detention center 
since the summer of last year, said 



the release. "They were the people 
who created J.O.E. in the fall. 
Essentially what JOE. is looking 
for now are students who want to 
work with kids during this summer 
as the initiators of JOE. did last 
year," it added. 

Supervising a weekly activity 
such as a field trip is one activity 
volunteers may supervise, it said. 
"However, a volunteer should 
make his or her appearance 
regular so the staff can get used to 
the fact that he or she will be 
coming to do this or that with some 
kids," they suggest. "Kids may 
differ each week, but it will be for 
the benefit of all kids and staff at 
the detention center. To be helpful 
in this area, a volunteer should be 
prepared to spend a minimum of 
half a day a week preferably a full 
day. 

"If you are a person with time on 
your hands with a high tolerenace 
level for chaos which basically 
means your self confidence is 
intact, you could work directly on 



Library Dedication Monday 



Author William Manchester's 29- 
year overdue library book is one of 
the items that will be placed in the 
cornerstone of the new UMass 
Library at the cornerstone 
ceremonv Monday, July 10. 

The book, "Six Plays of Clifford 
Odets," dates from the author's 
undergraduate days at the 
University. He borrowed it in May 
of 1942 and returned it last October, 
suggesting that the estimated 
$505.69 in late charges go to 
Friends of the Library, a 
development group of which he is 
president. 

Among other items in a sealed 
time capsule in the cornerstone 
will be documents and photos 
relating to the funding, design and 
const ruction of the building; a 
listing ol the cornerstone contents 
ol Goodell Library, the present 
UMass library; an account of the 
millionth volume acquisition 
ceremony; UMass catalogues and 
other material. 

The ceremony will begin at 10 
a.m. at the library site. Attending 
will be UMass President Robert 
Wood, UMass Amherst Chancellor 
Randolph W Bromery, library 
staff and others from UMass 
Amherst, plus representatives 
from the state Bureau of Building 
Construction, from Daniel 
O'Connells Sons of Holyoke, the 
builder, and from the architectural 
firm of Edward Durell Stone, the 
designer of the 28-story structure. 

The new library has an ultimate 
capacity of 2-1/2 million volumes. 
Two large floors under a terrace 
will house the main service, 



catalogue and storage areas; the 
tower floors will be book stack and 
study areas. Ground was broken 
for the $16.8 million structure in 
April of 1969. Of the total cost, over 
$2.43 million came from federal 
grants by the U.S. Office of 
Education. Occupation of the new 
building is scheduled to begin this 
fall. 



the floor at the detention center. 
There will be little time for a 
formal orientation for doing this 
type of work just learning be ex- 
perience. Any questions or 
problems you have will have to be 
asked after hours. A volunteer 
should be prepared to spend a 
minimum of two full days a week 
working at the center. 

"A third general area of 
volunteer work that is needed is 
that of taking kids out of the 
building for short periods of time. 
It would basically mean taking a 
kid on a one-to-one basis on an 
overnight or several day trip. This 
would, of course, center around 
some planned activity that might 
require such a time commitment. 

"Basically the call is out for 
help. JOE. needs you. If you are 
interested in becoming a volun- 
teer, you can call these numbers 
(5-0873/5) and place your name on 
a mailing list. People already 
working will be taking down in- 
formation concerning your interest 
and potential commitment. 
Currently plans are being drawn to 
generate an overall group action 
while letting individuals do their 
individual thing. However, what is 
being done presently is getting 
JOE. moving in some kind of 
volunteer summer program 
direction. If you want to be a part 
of any of this, please call and let us 
know," they concluded. 



The place that made Amherst 
famous. 

DRAKE RESTAURANT 

Village Inn 

RATHSKELLER 

85 AMITY 253-2548 

Open 11 a.m. — 2 a.m. 




JIM .V 10 



.<,v<'' 



MlliWAMPI 



NECCC Photo Competition Opens 
Tomorrow In Student Union 



Photograph Exhibition and c'ouncil represents 116 Camera 
Competition by the New England c i u bs. The theme for the show is 
Council of Camera Clubs will open unrestricted. The public as well as 
7:00 p.m. tomorrow and run until tne University Community is 
3:00 p.m. on Sunday in the Cape we lcome to attend free of charge. 
Cod Lounge, Student Union. The 




The Mount Holyoke 

College 
Summer Theatre 

South Hadley, Mass. 

proudly presents 

the delightful Broadway Musical 



A 



YOU'RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN 

T UES — SAT ., J UL Y 4 - 8 at 8 : 30 p.m. 

Tickets $2.50 and S3.50 

Students $ 1 off any ticket 

BOX OFFICE open 10 a.m. -9 p.m. daily except Sunday 

Phone (413) 538-2406 



> ol] LJALLKOtiM 



UMass Summer Program Presents 

JOSHUA RIFKIN 

Pianist 




Plays 

PIANO RAGS By Scott Joplin 
Thursday, July 6 - 8:00 P.M. 
Bowker Auditorium 



( Lecture/ Demonstration: 12: 30 p.m.) 
( Campus Center Concourse) 

UMass Summer Students w/ 1. D.'s: FREE 
Others $1.50 



Reserved Tickets: 
Center (545-2351) 
formance. 



Available at the Student Activities Office, Campus 
and at Bowker Aud., one hour before the per 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1972 



r 



Art Buchwald 



The Crier is a semi-weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in the Campus Center, 
Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for the contents^ No 
copy is censored by the administration before Publication. Represented for 

national advertising by National Educational Advertising Serv.ces, Inc. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



FINE ARTS 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

GilSalk.BrendaFurtak 

Elleni Koch 

Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 



You Can't Go Home 



WASHINGTON-The Old 
Democratic Pros were sitting in a 
smoke-filled room. No one was 
smiling. 

here going to 



I 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



Campus Carousel 

Lampoon, Money 

Bv TONY GRANITE 
THE HARVARD LAMPOON editors have selected Cosmopolitan 
Magazine to parody, this Fall. - 

•Were doing it because it's a very funny magazine and in the context ot 
women's liberation, very sexist and chauvinist." 

Other recent parodies: Playboy, Time and Life. 

MM 



**** 



MONEY IS THE ROOT OF THE EVIL TIMES befalling The Daily 
Reporter of Mankato (Minn.) State, according to continuing coverage of 
recent issues. Seems that the campus newspaper is in the hole to the tune 
of $12,000. The editors charge "inadequate budget of the Allocations 

Committee." . - « ... u 

Contributing to the dilemma is the decrease in budget resulting when a 

plan was presented two years ago to become fiscally independent m the 

face of an $18,00 loan to be repaid to the Committee. 
Current deficits are forcing the newspaper to dissolve its commercial 

production shop, discontinue wire services, and cutback in number of 

pages published. 

PRESS PROBLEMS ABOUND-as witness the recriminations rampant on 
the Middle Tennessee State campus, where the faculty advisor to the 
yearbook has been charged with "censorship". 

Seems that, without consulting the student editor, said adviser 
removed a page from the book when proofs were returned to him by the 
printer for checking. The editor discovered the change when the 
published book was delivered. . 

The offending page-to the adviser-was the reproduction of an editorial 
page of the campus newspaper. Sidelines, concerned with a controversy 
of the college president with the State Board of Education. 

The adviser explained that he thought the editorial concerned a period 
of the year that shouldn't go into a permanently bound volume which 
would be a reminder to the students of the incident. 



"Is anyone 
Miami?" " 

There was silence. 

"I ran for delegate," one pol 
said, "but I was beaten by a kid 
who plays drums with a rock group 
called the Meat Grinders.' " 

"Huh, I ran for delegate and was 
beaten by a 19-year-old girl who 
turned out to be a guy, after the 
votes were counted." 

"I've been going to Democratic 
conventions for 30 years, 20 of them 
as chairman of my delegation," a 
white-haired pro said. "I've given 
my all to the party. There isn't a 
judge in my state who doesn't owe 
his job to me. There isn't a federal 
marshal or a postmaster who can't 
say Big Al wasn't the greatest 
friend he ever had. When the 
people wanted roads, they came to 
me; when they wanted housing, 
Big Al was there; when they 
wanted a little something to tide 
them over, they knew my door was 
never closed. This time, when it 
came to choosing a delegate to the 
convention, what did they do? They 
elected a black woman jockey." 

"Jeez, Al! It's not going to be the 
same Demcratic convention 
without us." 

"What happened to all of us?" a 
bold, florid man asked. "What 
happned?" 

"I'll tell you what happened!" a 
man with a diamond stickpin in his 
tie shouted. "We did it to our- 
selves!" 

"How's that, Charley?" someone 
asked. 



"Remember when the kids were 
acting up and raising hell around 
the country?" 

"Who doesn't?" 

"Remember what we told them? 
We told them instead of demon- 
strating in the streets and closing 
down the schools that they should 
work within the system." 




"That's right," Big Al said. "I 
remember myself saying this 
country was so designed that you 
could get anything you wanted by 
working within the system." 

"Well, that's what the little 
stinkers did. They decided to work 
within the system, and now we're 
out on our butts." 

"But we didn't really mean for 
them to work within the system," 
the bald man said. "That was just 
a figure of speech-like 'Have a 
nice day' or 'Give my best to your 
wife.' " 



"Of course we didn't mean it," 
someone else said. "We meant 
they should work within the 
system, but do it by working for 
us." 

"Gentlemen," Charley said. 
"Our biggest mistake was not that 
we told them to work within the 
system, but that we never knew 
what the system was all about. Not 
one man in this room ever 
dreamed someone else could use 
the system as we did-to control the 
party." 

"Well," said one pol, "I think it's 
a pretty lousy system if anyone can 
take it over just because he has 
more votes." 

"You're damn right it is," said 
Big Al. "If I had known what they 
had on their minds, I would have 
advised them to go into the streets 
and have their heads bashed in!" 

"The thing to do now," one pol 
said, "is to change the system so it 
can't happen again." 

"It's too late," said Charley, 
"they have control of the party, the 
convention and the system." 

"Well," said Big Al, "we can't sit 
around here blowing cigar smoke 
at each other. What do we do?" 

"This is what we do," Charley 
said. "We go down to Miami next 
week and demonstrate." 

"We can't even get into the 
convention hall," a pol protested. 

"In the streets, dummy," 
Charley said, "in the streets." 

Copyright 1972, Los Angeles 
Times 



THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1972 



Open Letter To Doctor Gluckstern, Provost 



Dear Doctor Gluckstern: 

The teacher evaluation program has been 
the central concern of the Academic Affairs 
Committee for over two years. Tom Filmore 
began the operation which is now in our 
care. The Committee feels obliged to insure 
the success of the program by all means 
possible. We are committed to teacher 
evaluation and improvement, for this is the 
area which affects each student's education. 
There are two reasons why an effective 
teacher evaluation program can not be run 
and should not be run by students. The first 
is the lack of credibility with the faculty. 
Although we could begip an operation 
similar to this one. the only people that the 
faculty will have faith in are people like 
themselves. The second reason is the dif- 
ficulty in providing continuity. Students are 
concerned about being students, not about 
being administrators or professionals 

As you have suggested many times, 
faculty members must believe in the 
evaluations in order for them to be of ser- 
vice. The representatives of the Office of 
Teacher Evaluation must engender the trust 
of those who they must serve, that i ; the 
faculty and the s Mdents. The students 
realize the need for a professional staff and 
the faculty will respect no one but a 
professional staff. But beyond that, the 
evaluations must have impact, they must 
get at the root of the problems and help 
improve them. If they do not have the im- 
pression of being professional, of being 
accurate, .then they can easily be 
disregarded by faculty members who refuse 
to admit to bad teaching When we ad- 
ministered our program we were viewed as 
students at play; many used our facilities 
because they were free and could ignore the 
results if they so wished. We could not force 
them to recognize the professional aspects 
of our operation, nor could we demand 
manditory evaluations. Those resources 
were not at our disposal. 

The teacher evaluation field is complex 
and time consuming. In order to compose 
evaluative instruments, to write programs 
to analyze the results from those in- 
struments, and to help faculty make use of 
the results which will eventually lead to the 
improvement of teaching takes a time 
commitment which is beyond the reach of 
most students. This is not to say that we are 
uncommitted but rather that we are at the 



University for only four years and do not 
have the time nor the energy to devote to 
another profession besides our studies. We 
should not have to maintain the programs 
which we start, especially those programs 
which the institution itself should provide. 
Tom Filmore and the Committee succeeded 
in developing a University-wide system of 
teacher evaluation. They administered the 
form and processed the results. But they 
could not continue to maintain such an 
Office because too much time would be 
spent in teaching other students to take over 
for them when they left. Filmore's major 
thrusts were aimed at making the ad- 
ministration and the faculty recognize the 
value of a teacher evaluation-improvement 
program. This he succeeded in doing. It is 
my feeling that the administration and the 
faculty would not now be seriously con- 
sidering teacher evaluation had it not been 
for Tom Filmore and the Academic Affairs 
Committee. He did what students do best. 
They realize a need for something within the 
institution and then set about proving that it 
can operate and perform the functions 
which they want it to do. It is then in- 
cumbent upon the institution to make the 
operation a permanent one which serves the 
community. It is not incumbent upon the 
students to constantly sustain the operation. 
We both know of the response of the 
faculty to teacher evaluation and I sym- 
pathize with your less authoritarian ap- 
roach to creating a University-wide 
teacher evaluation program. But the time 
has come to consider student reaction to 
delays. Teaching on this campus needs 
improvement but improvement has been 
filibustered in committee after committee. 
Your pledges of support for the program 
seem as mere lip service to its success when 
one realizes that at the present rate it will be 
a year and a half before we have a director 
for the Office. 

In early December of 1970 you created the 
first teacher evaluation committee which 
was composed of eight faculty members, 
two graduate students, and two un- 
dergraduate students; they comprised the 
Ad Hoc Committee on Teacher Evaluation. 
Your words at that time were: It is the 
feeling of this Office that a new University- 
wide committee including both graduate 
and undergraduate students be established 
to attempt to address itself to specific 



recommendations to guide the ad- completes will be used in personnel 
ministration in dealing with the question of decisions. Good teachers yet remain 
teacher evaluation and the role of .teaching unrecognized and unrewarded at the 
generally on this campus. The Committee department level as can be illustrated most 
reported out in September of this part year; .vividly by the Mike Best case. Student m- 
although they did devote themselves to a 'terests are ignored time and again. 



You 



University-wide program and an Office of 
Teacher Evaluation and Improvement, they 
filed to address the problem of publication, 
or to be more specific, the use of the results 

in personnel decisions and by students in f student input into personnel decisions 
and professors. Later, 



yourself seem more concerned about the 
faculty reactions to the program than in 
making sure that teaching is improved and 
that teacher evaluation is a respected form 



choosing courses 

when the discussion became campus wide at 
the Undergraduate Education Conference, 
the departments and the Student Senate, the 
use of the Illinois Questionnaire or any other 
University-wide form came under question. 
In response to these attacks the ad- 
ministration refused to impose a single form 
on the departments and left the entire 
matter in the hands of the departments. You 
did, in response to the request of the 
Academic Affairs Committee and the 
Student Senate, create another teacher 
evaluation committee which would guide 
the Provost's Office and the director of that 
Office of Teacher Evaluation in ad- 
ministering the program. That committee 
was never convened until late March and 
has had only two meetings this year. It has 
had no time to pick a director or even an 
acting director and on the face of it the 
committee would seem to be a farce. There 
is now no hope of obtaining a director for 
September of this year and it is very 
possible that there will be no permanent 
director appointed until September of 1973. 
Without a director there is no chance that 
the quality of evaluation will improve and 
we will have to allow the new director at 
least two semesters to establish some sort of 
program. With all that taken into con- 
sideration, it will be September of 1974 
before an efficient program is off the 
ground; almost four years after the initial 
committee and five years after Filmore 
began organizing the Academic Affairs 
Teacher Evaluation Program. I find 
time delay distressing. 

With the process that is now in effect, 
students have no way of finding the good 
instructors beyond the grapevine method 
presently employed. Department forms 
vary to such degree that any sort of com- 
parison is meaningless. The student can not 
even be sure that the evaluations she or he 



I recommend the following be done im- 
mediately: 

1. The departments be directed to con 
struct forms which are machine scorable 
inorder that the results can be placed in an 
easily readable form. 

2. That all the forms be within certain 
limitations so that comparisons will be 
possible. 

3. That the University Teacher Evaluation 
Committee be convened within two weeks It 
has not met since May and there are a 
number of issues which must be confronted. 

4. That the Search Committee for a 
Director be established immediately and 
that no less than 50% of the membership be 
students. They should set as a target date 
January for finding a director. 

5. The departments should be «n form ^ d 
that the results of the evaluations should be 
placed in such a manner that publication <» 
[he results can be facilitated. This should be 
done beginning with the Spring 1W* 
evaluations. 

The reasons for my requesting that the 
above be done should be obvious. We teei 
that the Provost's Office has not been as 
responsive to student needs as it could be. 
We feel that we have acted in good faith, we 
the began the program; you assured us of your 
personal commitment to the program ana 
now we feel as though we have been had. 



Peace, 

Nicholas Apostola 

Chairman 

Committee on Academic Affairs 




BOOB U/M 




"This is OUR twenty two million dollar Campus Center?" 

J.O.E. Program Seeks Volunteers 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Three 

Continuing Ed Offers 
Body Training 

The Division of Continuing Education at UMass has announced a three- 
week workshop in Body Movement Training, taught by Amherst 
resident, Lyn Singer. The course will be conducted in the Women's 
Physical Education building from July 10 through 28, from 2:30-4:00 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 

The course, orginally designed as part of an actor-training program, 
provides a creative, releasing, and enjoyable program of exercise and 
body awareness. The underlying premise is that natural, relaxes 
movemet can happen only after ridding one's body of unneccessary 
tensions. Throughout the course, individual as well as group exercises 
will be conducted. Though not a sensitivity or encounter group, this kind 
of workshop is useful in such work since the class fosters a high degree of 
mutual dependence and group cohesiveness. 

Lyn Singer is an Oberlin College student majoring in communications 
and theatre arts. She has worked in theatre since high school and has 
been particularly active in the summer program in Amherst, which has 
been in operation since 1967. Lyn is now on the board of directors for the 
program this summer and will act as movement coach for the produc- 
tions. 

In January, 1971, Miss Singer attended workshops in gymnastics, stage 
fencing, and sta fe e movement in conjunction with a production of The 
Taming of the Shrew at Oberlin. January, 1972, was spent in London, 
studying body movement with a professional teacher of movement who 
works with many of the London experimental theatre companies. 

The workshop is co-educational and open to all men and women from 
high school age on up. Further questions concerning the program may be 
addressed to the Division of Continuing Education... 545-2591 (Campus 
Center). 



Juvenile Opportunity Extension 
(JOE.) is looking for volunteers 
to work with kids and staff at and 
away from the Westfield Detention 
Center according to a program 
release. There are many things a 
volunteer can do but the critical 
question of transportation 
remains, it said. A volunteer with a 
car or access to a car is of the 
highest value to the overall effect. 
"After transportation gets cleared 
away you can consider these 
general areas of volunteer work," 
they said. 

JOE. sponsored a month long 
program last January where youth 
who were the responsibility of the 
Department of Youth Services 
lived on a one-to-one basis with 
students at UMass. Approximately 
100 students were involved, many 
of which were regular JOE. 
volunteers. 

Volunteers from the University 
interested in work with kids have 
been going to the detention center 
since the summer of last year, said 



the release. "They were the people 
who created J.O.E. in the fall. 
Essentially what JOE. is looking 
for now are students who want to 
work with kids during this summer 
as the initiators of JOE. did last 
year," it added. 

Supervising a weekly activity 
such as a field trip is one activity 
volunteers may supervise, it said. 
"However, a volunteer should 
make his or her appearance 
regular so the staff can get used to 
the fact that he or she will be 
coming to do this or that with some 
kids," they suggest. "Kids may 
differ each week, but it will be for 
the benefit of all kids and staff at 
the detention center. To be helpful 
in this area, a volunteer should be 
prepared to spend a minimum of 
half a day a week preferably a full 
day. 

"If you are a person with time on 
your hands with a high tolerenace 
level for chaos which basically 
means your self confidence is 
intact, you could work directly on 



Library Dedication Monday 



Author William Manchester's 29- 
year overdue library book is one of 
the items that will be placed in the 
cornerstone of the new UMass 
Library at the cornerstone 
ceremonv Monday, July 10. 

The book, "Six Plays of Clifford 
Odets," dates from the author's 
undergraduate days at the 
University. He borrowed it in May 
of 1942 and returned it last October, 
suggesting that the estimated 
$505.69 in late charges go to 
Friends of the Library, a 
development group of which he is 
president. 

Among other items in a sealed 
time capsule in the cornerstone 
will be documents and photos 
relating to the funding, design and 
construction of the building; a 
listing of the cornerstone contents 
ol Goodell Library, the present 
I Mass library; an account of the 
millionth volume acquisition 
ceremony; UMass catalogues and 
other material. 

The ceremony will begin at 10 
a.m. at the library site. Attending 
will be UMass President Robert 
Wood. UMass Amherst Chancellor 
Randolph W. Bromery, library 
staff and others from UMass 
Amherst, plus representatives 
from the state Bureau of Building 
Construction, from Daniel 
O'Connell's Sons of Holyoke, the 
builder, and from the architectural 
firm of Edward Durell Stone, the 
designer of the 28-story structure. 

The new library has an ultimate 
capacity of 2-1/2 million volumes. 
Two large floors under a terrace 
will house the main service, 



catalogue and storage areas; the 
tower floors will be book stack and 
study areas. Ground was broken 
for the $16.8 million structure in 
April of 1969. Of the total cost, over 
$2.43 million came from federal 
grants by the U.S. Office of 
Education. Occupation of the new 
building is scheduled to begin this 
fall. 



the floor at the detention center. 
There will be little time for a 
formal orientation for doing this 
type of work just learning be ex- 
perience. Any questions or 
problems you have will have to be 
asked after hours. A volunteer 
should be prepared to spend a 
minimum of two full days a week 
working at the center. 

"A third general area of 
volunteer work that is needed is 
that of taking kids out of the 
building for short periods of time. 
It would basically mean taking a 
kid on a one-to-one basis on an 
overnight or several day trip. This 
would, of course, center around 
some planned activity that might 
require such a time commitment. 

"Basically the call is out for 
help. JOE. needs you. If you are 
interested in becoming a volun- 
teer, you can call these numbers 
(5-0873/5) and place your name on 
a mailing list. People already 
working will be taking down in- 
formation concerning your interest 
and potential commitment. 
Currently plans are being drawn to 
generate an overall group action 
while letting individuals do their 
individual thing. However, what is 
being done presently is getting 
JOE. moving in some kind of 
volunteer summer program 
direction. If you want to be a part 
of any of this, please call and let us 
know," they concluded. 



The place that made Amherst 
famous. 

DRAKE RESTAURANT 

Village Inn 

RATHSKELLER 

85 AMITY 253-2548 

Open 11 a.m. — 2 a.m. 




NECCC Photo Competition Opens 
Tomorrow In Student Union 



Photograph Exhibition and council represents 116 Camera 
Competition by the New England c i u bs. The theme for the show is 
Council of Camera Clubs will open unrestricted. The public as well as 
7:00 p.m. tomorrow and run until tne University Community is 
:?.00 p.m. on Sunday in the Cape we lcome to attend free of charge. 
Cod Lounge, Student Union. The 




The Mount Holyoke 

College 
Summer Theatre 

South Hadley, Mass. 

proudly presents 

the delightful Broadway Musical 



1 



YOU'RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN 

TUES — SAT., JULY 4 -8 at 8. -30 p.m. 

TicketsS2.50andS3.50 

Students S 1 off any ticket 

BOX OFFICE open 10 a.m. -9 p.m. daily except Sunday 

Phone (413) 538-2406 



UMass Summer Program Presents 

JOSHUA RIFKIN 

Pianist 




Plays 

PIANO RAGS By Scott Joplin 
Thursday, July 6 - 8:00 P.M. 
Bowlcer Auditorium 



( Lecture/ Demonstration: 12:30p.m.) 
( Campus Center Concourse) 

UMass Summer Students w/ 1. D.'s: FREE 
Others $1.50 



Reserved Tickets: Available at the Student Activities Office, Campus 
Center (545 2351) and at Bowker Aud., one hour before the per 
formance. 



Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 

Review 



THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1972 



THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Five 



Like A Purple Rug 



By LISA CASTILLO 

From the standpoint of most of 
us who are not art critics, "It looks 
good" as one unindoctrinated 
passerby commented. The black 
photographer. John Smith, com- 
ments on his work, "I don't know if 
it's universal, but a lot of people 
like it." 

A choice selection of Smith's 
photographic work is on exhibit 
from June 29-July 15 in the Student 
Union Art Gallery. The exhibit 
itself consists of three walls full of 
artistically arranged, sharply 
framed black photographs. Black 
in that both the frames and the 
subjects within are black. The 
main subjects are people, birds 
and garbage heaps. 

"My statement is. I'm in- 
volved," said Smith at the opening 
reception last Thursday. "You've 
got to get yourself into it." Smith 
wants to express himself, recreate 
what he sees, compare it to what 
the viewer sees and thereby turn 
the views onto photography. 
'Everything's instamatic," 
detested Smith, "what I'm saying 
is, I'm going back. Make them do 



some work." He wants you to tell 
him what you see and not vice 
versa. Then the cycle of com- 
munication will be completed. 



Although 66% of the pictures on 
exhibit are in color, Smith is more 
concerned with black and white, 
since he's just getting into it now. 
It's hard to work with black and 
white Smith informs us because, "I 
see in color. I dream in color," he 
said. 

On the evening of the opening 
reception, Smith was expressing 
himself loud and clear mainly 
through his art work but not only 
that. Tape recorded music ranging 
from the happy voices of children 
singing to the progressive jazz of 
Miles Davis made its way into your 
hearing apparatus. John Smith, 
equipped with sunglasses for the 
cloudy day, was on hand to com- 
ment and answer any questions. 
But probably the most life-giving 
form of communications (for 
Smith at any rate) was the neatly 
typed price list which lay unob- 
trusively on the windowsill. 

The viewer of the exhibit will 



notice almost immediately that 
there is a lot of duplication and 
variation within the exhibit. A 
small photo is hung on the wall and 
adjacent to it may be one, two or 
three enlarged identicals or near 
identicals. The enlarging process 
brings out different hues and 
emphasizes different lines, thus 
revealing different aspects of the 
photograph. 

As for the variations. Smith 
spends a lot of time with one 
subject in different poses and then 
hangs them all up together in a 
creative cluster. 

Smith obviously knows what he's 
going when it comes to the use of 
light. When asked how long he's 
been into photography, Smith 
replied, "Probably as soon as I 
could see. it just took me a while to 
get the mechanism down." 

The Art Gallery is open from 1-6, 
weekdays but these hours are 
subject to change anytime. 

Quoting from our famous 
unindoctrinated passerby again, 
"It's effective. There's a lot of 
pretty colors and it's shiny. It looks 
good like a purple rug looks good." 



Review 




You We A Good Man, Charlie Brown 



By ELLENI KOCH 

"Some psychiatrists say that 
people who eat peanut butter 
sandwiches are lonely," mumbles 
a depressed Charlie Brown after 
taking a stick-to-the-roof-of-your- 
mouth, medium-sized bite of his 
exciting lunch. "Oh, well, lunch 
hour is over with, only two 
thousand, eight hundred and sixty- 
three to go." Starting off a bit too 
singsong, John Caldwell eventually 
warmed up and gave the im- 
pression that this cartoon-strip 



character is indeed a failure. 
Obviously the most difficult and 
subtle part to play, there were 
many moments when PEANUTS 
fans saw their hero come to life in a 
very convincing manner. 



Lucy, after conducting a do-it- 
yourself neighborhood question- 
naire, discovered to her utter 
dismay that she was indeed a super 
crab. In a very bright and lively 



There's a new excitement 

at Weight Watchers. 



Why wait another day? 



AGAWAM American Legion 

478 Springfie'd Street 

Thurs. 9:30 a.m. and 700 p.m. 

AMHERST V.F.W, 457 Main St. 

Wed 700 p.m 

CHICOPEE FAILS High Pt Motor Inn 

450 Memorial Drive 

Wed 9 30 am. and 7:00 p.m. 

Tues 7:00 p.m 

EAST LONGMEADOW Italian-Amer 

Club, 213 Vineland Avenue 

Wed 7:00 p.m. 

GREENFIELD Weldon Hotel, High St. 
Thurs. 9:30 a.m., 1 p.m. & 7 p.m. 

HOLYOKE 

Howard Johnson Motor Lodge 

1515 Northampton Street, Rt. 5 

Wed 5:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m 

First United Chfch of Christ 



Join Weight Watchers' today. 



SOUTH HADLEY Polish American Club 

515 Granby Road 

Tues. 7:00 p.m. 



SPRINGFIELD 

Tues. 
Thurs 



Weight Watchers 

33 Eastland Street 

700 p.m (Men's Class) 

930 am and 7:00 p.m. 



16 Acres, Acre Brook Academy 

91 Old Acre Road 

Thurs. 7:00 p.m. 

Y.M.C.A. - 275 Chestnut Street 
Tues. 7:00 p.m. 

Y.W.C.A. - 26 Howard Street 
Wed 7:00 p.m. 

Eastfield Mall, 1655 Boston Rd. 
Tues 1230 p.m. 

Forest Park, Trinity United Church 

361 Sumner Avenue 

Tues 930 am and 7:00 p.m. 

Thurs. 7:00 p m 



performance, Marcia Bresslour 
portrayed the best seven-year- old 
super crab I have ever seen. 

Linus ( George Caff rey ) with his 
philosophical monologues was 
very funny, even though 
sometimes one had to double-take 
such gems as "I like a newspaper 
because you don't have to dial it." 
( He reads The Crier, no dialing. ) 

Predictably, Snoopy's puppy 
charm practically stole the show. 
He becomes quite upset after Patty 
( Nana Greenwald ) rejects a kiss : 
"The curse of a fuzzy face". Later, 
Michael Walker really brought to 
life the by-now classic story of 
Snoopy with his Sopwith Camel 
against the cursed Red Baron. A 
delight to the audience, and 
seemingly to Snoopy, too, was the 
coincidental addition of loud 
fireworks heard as town residents 
of South Hadley celebrated In- 
dependence Day evening. (But 
maybe it really was the Red 
Baron??) 

The performance began at 8:30, 
showtime, so the capacity crowd of 
300 people was not kept waiting. 
Mt. Holyoke College Summer 
Theatre is a great summertime 
bargain for live plays. Students get 
additional discounts of $1 .00 off any 
ticket. Shows run from Tuesday to 
Saturday, so there's still time to 
catch "You're a Good Man, Charlie 
Brown". Next week's play is 
"Private Lives", a comedy by Noel 
Coward. 





474 Pleasant Street 


SPFLD. BOYS' CLUB 


488 Carew 


Thurs 


7:00 p.m. 


Wed 


7:00 p.m. 


LUDLOW 


Polish Amer Citizens Club 


WARE White Eagle CI , 56 Pulaski St. 




335 East Street 


Wed 


700 p.m. 


Wed 


7:00 p.m. 








WESTFIEID Tone 


NORTHAMPTON Polish Nat Assoc 


Rt 20 - 


Westfield Road 




Pearl Street 


Wed 


7:00 p.m. 


Wed. 


9:30 am and 700 p.m. 


St Rocco's Club 


, 300 Elm Street 




Y MCA - Prospect St 


Tues. 


7:00 p.m. 


Thurs 


7:00 p.m. 


WEST SPRINGFIELD 


YM.C.A 

7 Upper Church 


PALMER 


American Legion Hall 
12 Thorndike Street 


Thurs 


7 00 p.m. 


Tues 


700 p m. 


WILBRAHAM 


Polish American 
Veterans Club 




Wmg Mem Hosp , Wright St 


28 


Stony Hill Road 


Thurs. 


700 pm 


Tues 9.30 am 


and 7:00 p.m 



Come 

Join 

Room 
127 C.C. 



Us 



For More Information — Call 413-732-6613 

WEIGHT®WATCHERS. 

Some talking, some listening, and a program that works." 

($8 



Review 

Tanglewoodjune 30, 

of Bach 



Night 



Bv ELLENI KOCH 

The serene setting at 
Tanglewood was a little too 
cold and damp for an ideal 
opening night last Friday. 
However, Seiji Ozawa and the 
Chamber Plavers of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra quickly 
warmed the attending lovers of 

Bach. 

The first piece performed 
was the popular Brandenburg 
Concerto *2. Crisp conducting 
in the first movement gave 
way to an abandonment of the 
baton within the second 
movement, the andante. The 
personal communion was 
evident, especially during the 
lovely solo of the flutist Doriot 
Anthony Dwyer. Her per- 
formance in the two Bran- 
denburgs. as well as the rest of 
the concert, was superb. 

The Brandenburg Concerto 
#5 had a diamond in it. Robert 
Levin, who has a reputation as 
an improvisor. was incredible 



during his solo performance in 
the first allegro. The ex- 
traordinary differences in 
intensity and feeling he elicited 
from the harpsichord before 
seemed possibly only from a 
piano. Levin cast a spell over 
all, including, it seemed, 
Ozawa, who moved his flexible 
body only to turn a page of 
music. If Doriot Dwyer stole 
the 2nd concerto, then the 5th 
unquestionably belonged to 
Levin. 

Unhappily, intermission was 
next, but happily, it was a short 
one. The concerto-like Suite »2 
proved another virtuoso 
performance for Ms. Dwyer, 
but Seiji Ozawa really gloried 
in 'Gloria in Excelsis Deo". 
Bach's Cantata No. 191 and the 
finale of the concert. During 
the last verse especially, poetic 
expression erupted from 
Ozawa 's taught body, bringing 
the choral group and the 
concert to a successful and 
powerful close. 



Holyoke Workshop 
Presents Musicals xk 

performers in Europe. The songs 



Music Theatre Workshop, a 
group of college students from the 
Springfield and Boston areas, will 
present three musicals during the 
month of July. Starting with 
'You're a Good Man, Charlie 
Brown" July 5-8, followed with 
"Jacques Brel is Alive and Well 
and Living in "aris" July 12-15, 
and ending with 'Annie Get Your 
Gun'' July 19-22. 

All of the shows are highly 
sophisticated examples of musical 
productions. "You're a Good Man, 
•Charlie Brown"' often thought of as 
a children's show, makes its best 
appeal to adults who can ap- 
preciate the subtlety of its humor. 
Composed of vignettes from the 
"Peanuts" series, the show 
features all six of the best known 
members of the strip: Charlie 
Brown, Linus, Lucy, Schroeder, 
Patty, and. of course, Snoopy. 
Each has ample opportunity to 
reveal his own special personality 
as they make their way through 
one day in the life of Charlie 
Brown. 

"Jacques Brel is Alive and Well 
and Living in Paris" which has 
played to full houses in Boston and 
New York as well as throughout 
Europe for four years, is an en- 
tirely different type of musical. It 
is composed of the songs and the 
words of Jacques Brel, one of the 
most reknown song writers and 



predominate but they are a variety 
of style and depth unparalled in 
any other show. Brel has much to 
say about love, loneliness, and 
alienation, but the show is 
balanced by many sparkling 
numbers in the style of the old 
English music hall. The com- 
bination is capable of stirring an 
audience almost to a frenzy of 
enthusiasm or to a shower of tears 
See it with someone you love. 

The workshop's last production. 
"Annie Get Your Gun" needs no 
explanation. No other musical can 
match Irving Berlin's great score, 
with such hits as "No Business 
Like Show Business", "They Say 
It's Wonderful". "The Girl That 1 
Marry", "Doin' What Comes 
Natur'lly", "Anything You Can 
(C ontinued on Page. 5) 

BEATLES' 
Concert Film 

Complete performances of 
the first concert in U.S. 19 
plus 
'SPANKY & OUR 
GANG Comedy 
*CARTOON and 
lots of fun 

FRIDAY, JULY? 
8: 30 & 10 

FOLKLORE CENTER 

( Behind the Lord Jeff) 




The 
Chopping Block 
does great 

things 
for your head. 

MBNA WOMEN 

Mon. — Frl.9-7:30 
Sat. 9 - 5 

253-9293 
26 Main St. 



WHOM! WAICHIIS 
INTIINATIONAl. INC 



AND 
GHAT 



All "ICIIIIIID TIAOIMAtKS Or WilCHT WAICHIIS 
NICK. N T WHOM! WATCHIIS INTIINATIONAl, 1171 




FRIDAY NIGHT SERVICES 7:30 p.m 

Hillel Center — 420 Student Union 

Summer Activities will be discussed afterwards. 



Meditation 
Lecture 
Tonight 

There will be a second in- 
troductory lecture on the technique 
of Transcendental Meditation 
today at 8 p.m., SBA 120, after 
which personal instruction in the 
technique of TM will be offered. 

The experience of several 
hundred thousand meditators 
throughout the world indicates that 
regular practice of TM benefits 
every area of life. By tapping the 
inner reservoir of potential, TM 
allows any individual to express 
more energy, creative intelligence, 
and happiness in every aspect of 
life. The technique is so easy to 
learn and practice that 100% of 
those who regularly practice TM 
experience these results. 

In the last three years scientific 
research, most recently at Har- 
vard Medical School, has shown 
that TM produces a unique state of 
rest that energizes the entire 
system and allows for natural 
release of stress and anxiety. This 
unique physical and mental state 
produced by TM has been labelled 
by researchers as a four major 
state of consciousness. 

A side effect of TM practice is 
the decided preference of 
meditators for TM rather than 
drugs. Surveys have showed that 
those who practice TM stop 
abusing drugs. 

A regular program of courses in 
TM will be offered at UMass 
throughout the summer. Further 
information about these courses 
may be obtained from SIMS- 
Western Mass. 253-7246. 



Voter Registration Eased 



Boston — Under legislation introduced by Rep. 
John W. Olver (D-Amherst) and signed into law by 
the Governor, voter registration will become far 
more accessible and convenient for a larger part of 
the population. 

House Bill 3154 goes into effect this week and should 
be of great aid to workers, elderly, and young people 
in registering to vote for the coming elections. 

The act provides for voter registration sessions in 
places of principal activity. Thus, registrars or 
election commissioners shall hold registration 
sessions in any factory, mill, school, college or 
university, hospital, nursing or rest homes, and any 
other place where persons regularily gather for 
employment or other principal activity within their 
city or town. 

Therefore, registration sessions could conceivably 
be extended to shopping areas, public recreational 
areas, or other places where citizens regularily 
frequent. 



The law requires that such registration sessions be 
provided if ten or more voters of a city or town file a 
petition with registrars or commissioners within 48 
days before a primary and 46 days before the final 
election. The petition would be for holding a 
registration session at the place specified by the 
citizens. 

Permission of any owner or tenant of the place 
must be obtained also. 

Rep. Olver, a candidate for State Senate, is con- 
fident the law will make the voter registration 
process much more accessible to citizen's needs. He 
said, "This legislation will enable many of our 
citizens, such as workers, elderly, those who may be 
ill, students, and working mothers, to be able to 
register to vote more easily. Previously, they found it 
quite difficult, because the registrars may not be 
open when these people could register, or was in an 
out of the way place." 



Double Feature 

Film Series: 
Potato, Raisin 



College Changes Name 



UMass has changed the name of its oldesl 
academic division from College of Agriculture to 
College of Food and Natural Resources. 

The action was voted by the UMass Board of 
Trustees at a meeting at the Suburban Experiment 
Station in Waltham. The change had been recom- 
mended after a study by a committee of faculty from 
the Amherst campus. 

According to the committee report, the name 
change better reflects the total mission and function 
of the college. Colleges of agriculture founded under 
the Morrill Land Grant Act of 1862 that originally 
concentrated on the production of crops and animals 
are now concerned with all of man s relationships to his 
land, plant and animal resources, the report stated. 

In the UMass college, 95 per cent of the students do 
not have farm backgrounds. They come from urban 
areas and return to jobs in urban areas, pursuing 
study in such fields as forest hydrology, wildlife and 



fisheries biology, environmental design, plant 
science or hotel, restaurant and travel ad- 
ministration. 

Enrollment has increased sharply in the college, 
according to the report, and is expected to continue to 
increase. In a recent national survey, the UMass 
college ranked 19th of the 70 institutions surveyed and 
was one of the top five nationally in undergraduate 
enrollment gains 

As of last fall the undergraduate enrollment was 
1219, making it the third largest professional school on 
campus. Of this total approximately half were 
studying in the general area of natural resource 
conservation and environmental planning. 

It was noted that the name change would in no way 
change the college's traditional agricultural service 
functions. The Agricultural Experiment Station, the 
research and problem solving arm of the college, and 
the Cooperative Extension Service, the public service 
arm, will continue in their roles. 



By GEORGE HIRSCII 

Raciai conflict as it affects two 
different family situations will be 
portrayed in the double feature 
film series Tuesday night in the 
Campus Center Auditorium. 

"One Potato, Two Potato ", a 92- 
minute story of the tribulations 
facing a white divorcee and the 
black man she marries, will be the 
evening's first film entertainment 
at 7:00. 

It will be followed at 9 by "A 
Raisin in the Sun". Sydney Poitier 
stars in this moving and passionate 
film about a Chicago Black family 
who move from the ghetto to the 
suburbs after receiving a $10,000 
insurance check. Poitier. playing a 
young man of the family, soon 
realizes that the insurance money 
brings many problems along with 
its obvious benefits. 

Admission is free to both movies. 
Seating priority, however, will be 
given to those possessing a UMass 
summer ID. 



Crime 
Ended 



A new Massachusetts law that 
goes into effect tomorrow will 
eliminate the crime of being 
present where marijuana is found. 
The law also reduces the penalties 
for possession of marijuana and 
heroin. 



DOUBLE FEATURE FILM SERIES 



One Potato 
Two Potato 



7 p.m. 



A Raisin 
In the San 

Starring 
Sidney Poitier 

9 p.m. 



Tuesday, July 11 
Campus Center Auditorium 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 



(Continued from Page 4) 

Do", and many others. A show for 
all ages. 

The workshop offers an unusual 
opportunity for all its members to 
play leads in professional 
productions, while at the same 
time gaining experience in all 
aspects of theatre crafts. ' 

Tickets are $2 and $3. Season 
tickets for all three shows are only 
$5 and $7. Group rates available for 
groups of five or more are $2.50 and 
$1.75 if tickets are reserved in 
advance. The shows run Wed- 
nesday through Saturday at 8:00. 
The workshop is located at Mit- 
tineague Methodist Church, 800 1 
Amostown Road, in West 
Springfield. In its second season, 
MTW needs audience support to 
continue to offer high quality 
productions at reasonable prices.) 

For reservations call 1-413-788- 
0258. 



Crier Classifieds 



FOR SALE 



CRIER CLASSIFIEDS 

EACH INSERTION 
CLASSIFIED INSERTION ORDER 



Client . , 



DATES TO RUN 



Headline 



1971 Ford Torino Squire Station 
Wagon V-8, power brakes, 
power steering, gray gold — 
3,000 miles. Best Offer. Call 
253 5641. 

8/15 



Nikon F Hard Leather case. 
Like New $15. Call Gib at 549 
6087. 

7/21 



1966 Dodge, V-6 Automatic. 
Exceptional mechanical con- 
dition and appearance. $550. 
Call 665 4513. 

7/11 



Two Raleigh touring bicycles, 
men's, 3 speed 23" frames, 3 
month's old, $ 100 the pair or best 
offer. Will trade for 1 8 or 10- 
speed, 256 8432. 

7/11 

1966 V.W. Bus, recent tune-up. 
Rebuilt engine, maintained. 
$600 or best offer — 253-2835. 

7/6 



FOR RENT 

Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $185 /M incl utilities. Call 
Resident AAgr 665 4239, if no 
answer 1-786-0500. 

8/15 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

Own room $80/m. New mod. 
apt, ww carpet, pool, air con- 
ditioning, etc. Mt. Sugarloaf| 
Apts. Call Ken 665 4169. 

7/61 



PERSONAL 

FREE Monthly Bargain Price] 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207 T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

8/15 



. •>. 



ADVERTISING COPY 







































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SERVICES 

Light hauling and moving. 
Reasonable rates. Call Jeff at 
253 2755 or Bill at 256 8258. 

7/6 

SUMMER TUNE UPS -some 
are not! Ours are and only $3.95 
a cylinder includes new 
Champion plugs, points, con 
denser, carburetor purge, and 
electronic timing. Spencer's 
Mobil 161 N. Pleasant St. (next 
to P.O .) 253 9059. 

6/29 



AVOID an automotive RIP 
OFF. No charge for estimates 
on repairs. All work guaranteed, 
at Spencer's Mobil 161 N. 
Pleasant St. (next to P.O.) 253- 
9050. 



If Phyllis Diller married Bob 

Chiller, she would be Phyllis | 

Diller Chiller (and even further 

confused). 

7/61 



ENTERTAINMENT 

BEATLES' CONCERT FILM, 
COMPLETE PER- 
FORMANCE OF THE FIRST 
CONCERT IN U.S., 1964, 
PLUS SPANKY AND OUR 
GANG COMEDY, CARTOON 
AND LOTS OF FUN. FRIDAY, 
JULY 7, 8:30 AND 10, 

FOLKLORE CENTRE, 

(BEHIND THE LORD 
JEFF). 

7/6 



NOTICE 

To ALL Students, Faculty, 
etc.: You are invited to meet 
each Tuesday at 7:00 p.m for 
an informal Christian Science 
College Organization 
testimonial meeting. Call 256 
8740 (evenings) for location. 
* 6/29 



■Crier Classifieds 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1972 



THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 



English Faculty Attend 
Annual Writers Workshop 



The 26 annual writers workshop, which got 
underway at The Chautauqua Institution July 3, is 
made up exclusively of UMass English Depart- 
ment members. 

Directing the three-week sessions in the writing 
of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and journalism will 
be Arnold Kenseth, lecturer in Poetry at UMass. 

He will be assisted by Dr. Leon Barron, 
associate professor, who will teach the fiction 
writing workshop, and Prof. John H. Mitchell, 
non-fiction. Dr. Dario Politella, associate 
professor of English and Journalistic Studies at 
UMass, will return to Chautauqua for his fifth 
season to conduct a five-day workshop in jour- 
nalism. 



The Chautauqua Institution will be celebrating its 
98th season as the nation's oldest summer cultural 
community. Founded in 1974, Chautauqua is 
situated on the banks of Chautauqua Lake in the 
northwestern corner of Upstate New York. 

In assuming his duties as Writer's Workshop 
director for 1972, Kenseth is serving his second 
season since he succeeded Dr. G. Stanley Koehler, 
who has been on sabbatical from UMass. 



UMass faculty have been active at Chautauqua 
since 1960, when young people's courses were 
instituted in creative writing and journalism. 

Besides lecturing on the various forms of 
writing, the workshop faculty also provide in- 
dividual consultation. And besides their hour-long 
daily presentations, they discuss other aspects of 
contemporary fiction and poetry each Thursday 
evening. 

Each member of the faculty is a recognized 
authority in his field. Kenseth has published two 
volumes of poetry, an anthology and a collection of 



prayers, meditations and canticles. Winner of the 
American Scholar Poetry Award, his poems have 
appeared in The Atlantic, The Saturday Review, 
The Virginia Quarterly, The American Scholar, 
Poetry and Commonweal. He also serves the 
South Congregational Church in Amherst as 
pastor. 

Barron is the author of two books, as well as of 
poems which have appeared in such magazines as 
Folio, The Massachusetts Review, The Galley Sail 
Review, and College English. "The Poetry of Leon 
Barron" has been recorded in the Harvard 
Vocarium Series. He has also served as Fiction 
Editor of The Massachusetts Review. 

Mitchell is the author of two textbooks on 
technical writing and more than 50 articles on 
communication. He has also written for TV, radio 
and governmental agencies. A former director of 
the Tufts University and the Nantucket Writers 
Workshops, he is also an international consultant 
on the communication of scientific and technical 
information. 

Politella is nationally recognized as an authority 
on student journalism. The author of four books, 
he is a prolific writer of magazine articles on 
campus journalism. The founder and former 
editor of The Collegiate Journalist magazine, 
since 1970 he has been founding editor of The 
Campus Press Syllabus, a quarterly magazine. 
Editor of The Anatomy of Campus Journalism 
Series, his newst books are to be released by 
Oxbridge Pub. Co. of New York, this fall. They are 
"The Making of A Journalist" and the third edition 
of his biennial "Directory of the College Student 
Press in America." He is also an advisor for The 
Crier. 

The workshop extends from July 3 through July 
21. 



UYA Seeks Members 



Hamp' College Receives $1,000,000 



Hampshire College has received 
a gift of $1 million from the Charles 
E. Merrill Trust. New York, for 
capital construction. The an- 
nouncement of the gift was made 
by Charles R. Longsworth, 
president of the College, to the 
academic council, a group com- 
posed of the entire faculty with 
student and staff representatives. 

In making the announcement. 
President Longsworth expressed 
how significant the gift for capital 
construction will be in creating 
facilities for the performing arts 
and for sports and recreation on 
the campus. "It comes at a time 
when we need these facilities very 



much. We are especially grateful 
for the continued support and 
demonstration of confidence that 
the Trustees of the Merrill Trust 
have in Hampshire College." 

The Merrill Trust also granted $1 
million to Hampshire College in 
August 1969 for construction of 
residential facilities housing 250 
students and named in honor of the 
Trust's benefactor, Mr. Charles E. 
Merrill. The late Mr. Merrill was 
the founder of Merrill Lynch, 
Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Inc., the 
nation's largest investment firm. 

The Merrill grant brings to 
$27,500,000 the funds raised to 



The University Year For AC- 
TION (UYA) is still looking for 
qualified students to fill openings 
in its Phase III Program. 

UYA, part of the Federal AC- 
TION Agency, is placing more than 
70 UMass students in about 15 anti- 
poverty related agencies for a 
year's work starting in September. 
UYA Volunteers work as regular 
staff members in their agencies for 
the year, while they remain UMass 
students and get full University 
credit. The Volunteers also receive 
living stipends and other benefits 
amounting to about $3,000 for the 
year. 

Openings for positions in the 
following agencies are available: 
Urban League of Springfield, 
needs staff to work in the public 
housing area and housing law; 
Brightwood Social Services of 
Springfield, needs staff to help 
organize the community in the 
north end of Springfield and 
develop a tenant council in this 
Spanish-speaking community; 
Neighborhood Legal Services of 
Springfield, needs staff to work as 
legal paraprofessionals to low- 
income people in housing, 
education and welfare law; Nor- 



develop the academic programs 
and facilities on the 550 acre 
Hampshire campus in Amherst, 
Massachusetts. Hampshire 
College was founded in 1966 with an 
initial pledge of $6 million from 
Harold F. Johnson, an Amherst 
alumnus. Hampshire College is the 
result of a plan proposed by 
Amherst, Mount Holyoke and 
Smith Colleges and the UMass to 
add a fifth experimental institution 
to their community. Hampshire is 
mandated to encourage 
cooperative activity among these 
institutions and to innovate with 
new solutions to the undergraduate 
liberal arts curriculum. 



thern Berkshire Early Childhood 
Development Program, needs staff 
to work on low-income childhood 
health programs; Hamp- 
shire/Franklin Correctional 
Services, needs Spanish-speaking 
staff to work with inmates on 
tutoring and release job-finding 
programs. 

The UYA Program at UMass, 
directed by Dr. Ruth W. Burgin, 
currently has about 80 students 
working in 25 agencies, in the areas 
of Health, Education, Economic 
development. Administration of 
justice, Housing and social ser- 
vices. 

If you are interested in being a 
part of the UYA Program, and you 
are a UMass graduate or un- 
dergraduate student, UYA invites 
you to the UYA Office on East 
Pleasant Street. After filling out 
applications UYA will send you to 
the agencies to find out more about 
the jobs, and where you would best 
fit in. 

"This is a chance to do 
something of real value while you 
earn college credit," says a UYA 
spokesman. More information is 
available at the UYA Office or call 
545-1381, and ask for John Watson. 



Hampshire Dean Appointed 



Myron J. Lunine, Dean of the 
Honors and Experimental College 
and Associate Professor of 
Political Science at Kent State 
University, Ohio, was appointed 
Dean of Hampshire College by the 
Board of Trustees recently. In 
addition, he has been appointed to 
the Faculty as Professor of 
Political Science. 

A native of Reading, Penn- 
sylvania, Lunine is a 1951 cum 
laude graduate of the University of 
Iowa, where he was elected to Phi 
Beta Kappa. He earned an M.A. in 
philosophy from the Univerity of 
Illinois in 1953 and in 1963 received 

his doctor of philosophy degree in of recession and poverty, war and 
political science from the peace, problems and possibilities 
University of Iowa. of education for the future, among 

At Kent State his service in- others. 



Inside Astrology 



eludes membership on the Institute 
of African American Affairs Ad- 
visory Council; the Commission on 
College Teaching; and the Com- 
mittee on Innovative Curriculum 
Change. He is Danforth liaison 
officer for the University. 

Dean Lunine's teaching interests 
have broad range, focusing upon 
political thought and ideologies 
and underdeveloped regions of the 
world as well as social issues such 
as "the good society" and 
"science, technology, and 
humanism." During the past two 
years he developed a series of 
experimental clusters on the topics 




By MADELEINE MONNET 

STELLAR PROFILE: 

THE DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION 

The "Big Political Beauty Contest" is 
on! The "Bathing Suit Competition," 
from the disaff point of view, isn't bad at 
all. Of course we all know talent and 
personality credits go a long way with the 
judges. Then there's the most-popular- 
and best liked by everyone loser vote. 

The burning question for the 
Democrats isn't entirely "Who's the best 
man for the country?" but precisely 
"Who can beat Nixon?" (while not too 
much disturbing the comfortable status 
quo). They can get a headache juggling 
the preset situation and so can any self- 
respecting astrologer. 

Astrology readily gets to looking like 
"crystall ball gazing," when what it 
actually consists of is sets of 
mathematical combinations representing 
energy fields. Universal energy patterns 
lead to influences and conditions that 
shape events, which, in turn, mold at 
titudes and character. 

Somewhere in the past thousand years 
man's "free will" got sidestepped and 
this logical process reversed into a hocus 
pocus, it's all revealed in the heavens' 
magic. 

As my students soon discover there is 
no magic panacea in astrology; rather a 
lot of hard work that, combined with 
judgment, provides an excellent compass 
for navigating the oceans of life. Properly 
used it frees man rather than limits him. 

What is needed for best results, precise 
birth information, is rarely available. I 
have seen even hospital records so goofed 
up that footprints were recorded a half 
hour before birth time. Nice trick if you 
can pull it off 

There are two hour of day times 
floating around for most public figures, 
and often more than one year. A chart 
only has to be off by four minutes to throw 
you off a whole year on major 
programming that can redirect the entire 
life 

Working face to face with an individual 
who is cooperating in total, * competent 
astrolcqer, using past events, can pin the 
time down to the minute. This can take 
one to nve hours depending on how far off 
the original information is and how good a 
memory the client has. 

George McGovern's office has given 
out two birth times; par for the course. 

For over a year astrologers, your 
correspondent included, have been "put 
on" to predict not only the Democratic 
candidate but the winner of the 
presidential race. Knowing the planets 
show upsets and the "unpredictable," 
realizing that "evolved man" has power 
to overcome universal forces; I have 
refused to mount that limb. Some have 
named so many winners it is evident they 
are taking no chances on not "hitting." 

The one questions in the minds of most 
is "How good is George McGovern at 
handling money?" Born July 19, he is 
under the sign with the best credentials 
tor finance. He shows talent in this 
department, though carries danger of 
overoptimism and "secret enemies." 

No question he is alienating big 
business with each giant, share the 
wealth stride of his campaign. The chart I 
am using (after five hours of work) 
reveals great strength this year, but is 
under attack by this week's eclipse. 



in my opinion, if the big boys can figure 
a way to sidestep the public mandate they 
will not give the nomination to Geroge M. 
But there can be a lot of trouble if they do 
not. 

As I mentioned back in March, the 
chart pulling the strongest support and 
magnetism right now still belongs to Ted 
Kennedy. It also reveals the dangers of 
which he is so apprehensive, but there is 
an excellent chance Ted will be on the 
final ticket. 

STAR TRENDS: Change is the order of 
the day. Trends are towards new con- 
cepts being initiated that will prove 
beneficial and practical. However, where 
the old orders will not yield to the new, 
there is danger of reverberations and 
upsets! 

ARIES: (Mar. 21 Apr 4) Apply 
yourself to a search of the archives of 
experience to find perfect solutions. (Apr. 

5 19) Life can be thrilling, but for every 
prize there is a price. Don't pay too 
dearly. 

TAURUS: (Apr. 20 May 5) Caution is 
still the prevailing solar wind blowing in 
your direction. Cool it. (May 6 20) Your 
judgment can be a shade off; rely on a 
respected authority for advice. 

GEMINI: (May .-1 June 6) There aren't 
any mountains you can't scale now if you 
sincerely know what you want. (June 7- 
21 ) Communications is always our area of 
strength; right now it's super special. 

CANCER: (June 22 July 7) The temp 
tation to spend what you don't have must 
be curbed, budget carefully. (July 8-22) A 
momentous year is upcoming when your 
whole life will find new directions for self- 
expression. Try to relax and go with the 
tide of events. There is much you can 
contribute of o positive natire. 

LEO. (July 23 Aug. 7) You bring a 
special magic to the mundane. A time to 
try even the impossible. iAug. 8 22) 
Beautiful harmony can be attained, 
tackle the troubled areas of your 
relationships. 

VIRGO: (Aug. 23 Sept. 7) Bucking the 
system will get you the other side of 
nowhere; shape up quickly (Sept. 8-22) A 
powerful ally can work maqic in areas 
where you've fumbled the ball. 

LIBRA: (Sept 230ct. 7) You energize 
mentally and physically with renewed 
ability. (Oct. 8 22) Excellent currents 
releasing for the harmony you need, but 
sidestep the "biggies" for the moment. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 Nov. 7) Moderate in 
alt of life's departments and rememBer 
anger defeats. (Nov. 8 21) Excellent for 
concentrating on home projects, explore 
real estate buys, but don't sign! 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov 22 Oec. 7) A 
bright idea lights up your sky; tune in to 
your higher self for guidance. (Dec. 8 21) 
Re evaluate associates >nd your 
potential; make changes where needed. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22- Jan. 5) You are 
still in the middle of a positive pattern; 
continue to project your best effort. (Jan. 

6 19) There's no way to be too ca r eful 
tow; don't launch any new balloons! 

AQUARIUJ: (Jar.. 2u Feb 3) "Wnom 
the God's would defeat, they first make 
angry," 'noughsaid. (Feb. 4 18) Don't get 
overconfident and spoil the precious gifts 
marked for vou. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 Mar. 7) Coast and 
hang on to what you've gained. (Mar. 8- 
20) Quiet projects away from the crowd 
serve you best in this cycle. 



If You Are Arrested - Part III 



WHAT MAY YOU BE REQUIRED 
TO DO? 

You may be asked to participate 
in a line-up, to prepare a sample of 
your penmanship, or to speak 
phrases associated with the offense 
you are charged with. You have a 
right to have a lawyer present to 
advise you in respect to these 
matters. 



Crossword Puzzle 

ACROSS 



If someone promises you 
something, if you sign a document, 
or if you are threatened or forced 
to sign something, tell your lawyer 
or the police official in charge. 
MAY YOU BE PHYSICALLY 
EXAMINED? 

The police may take fingerprints 
and photograph. If you are 



Answer to Last Issue's Puzzle 



1 Algerian 
seaport 
5 Decorate 
9 Male swan 

12 Man's 
nickname 

13 Rockfish 

14 Exist 

15 Cooled lava 

16 Journey 

18 Sailor (colloq.) 
20 Conjunction 
22 Later 
24 Possessive 

pronoun 
27 Wander 
29 Pertaining to 

an era 

31 Stitch 

32 Growing out of 
34 Row 

36 Hebrew letter 

37 Roof of mouth 
39 Jumped 

41 Hebrew month 

42 Vandals 

44 Look fixedly 

45 Sick 

47 Roman date 

49 Poses for 
portrait 

50 Hindu 
peasant 

52 Cut 

54 Behold! 

55 Grain 
57 Mine 

entrance 
59 Maiden loved 

by Zeus 
61 Possesses 
63 Heraldry: 

grafted 
65 Nobleman 

67 PeerGynt's 
mother 

68 Want 

69 Act 

DOWN 

1 New Deal 
agency (init.) 



2 Equitably 

3 Near 

4 Openwork 
fabric 

5 Threefold 

6 Rumor 

7 Preposition 

8 Small rug 

9 Manifests 
solicitude 

10 Conjunction 

11 Exist 
17 Sun god 

19 Exclamation 
21 Egg-shaped 
23 Metal 
fastener 

25 List of plays 

26 Europeans 

27 Mend 

28 Greenland 
settlement 

30 Dregs 

33 Sewing case 



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arrested for a felony, the police 
have a right and a duty to 
photograph and fingerprint you. 
You may ask to be examined by 
your own doctor at your own ex- 
pense, and the police must give 
you a reasonable opportunity to 
have this done. 



WHAT HAPPENS TO MONEY OR 
PROPERTY YOU MAY HAVE 
WITH YOU? 

The police may take the money 
and property from you to keep in a 
safe place until it can be returned 
to you or used as evidence. 

The police will list the items on 
an envelope, and they may ask you 
to sign the list. 

You should make sure that the 
list includes all the items taken 
from vou. 



HOW ARE YOU RELEASED? 

The way you are released will 
vary depending on the nature of the 
offense, the time of day or night 
you are charged, and the 
availability of the court officer. 
Usually a judge, clerk of court, bail 
commissioner, or some other of- 
ficial decides how you will be 
released. He considers the crime 
you are charged with, your family 
ties, financial resources, 
character, length of residence in 
the community, your previous 
record of flights to avoid 
prosecution or failure to appear at 
court proceedings. 



Ordinarily in Massachusetts, you 
should be released on personal 
recognizance. Personal 
recognizance is your promise to 
appear in court. 



You may be released on bail. If the test shows you were not 

Rail is money or other property intoxicated, the police must 

you leave as security that you will release you at once. If the test is 

appear in court. positive, you will be tried in court. 



HOW CAN YOU GET MONEY 
FOR BAIL? 

You may pay your bail fee: 

WITH cash. 

WITH a bond on your house, 
car bonds, etc. 

WITH money on your property 
put up by a friend or relative. 

WITH a bail bond. There are 
regulations as to bail bondsman. 

WHAT SPECIAL RULES APPLY 
TO ARRESTS FOR 
DRUNKENNESS? 

If you are arrested for 
drunkenness, you are taken to the 
station, booked and retained for a 
minimum of four hours. 



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If you are released, the police 
may ask you to sign a release form 
in which you plead guilty to the 
charge of drunkenness. This type 
of release is a special procedure 
for drunkenness cases that does 
not require you to appear in court, 
but which automatically enters a 
finding of guilty on your record. 

After 1973, public drunkenness 
will no longer be a criminal of- 
fense. 



If you are charged with drunken 
driving, the police may ask you to 
take a "breathalizer" test to 
determine the ilcoholic content of 
vour blood. 

You cannot be forced to take this 
test, but if you refuse in 
Massachusetts, you will lose your 
drivers' license for 90 days. If the 
results of the test fall within cer- 
tain limits, the test may be used for 
or against you in court. 



WHEN DO YOU GO TO COURT? 

You may go to court either 
directly after you are arrested and 
booked, or the next day-depending 
upon the time of day you are 
arrested. Usually at court a date in 
the future is set for your trial. 

BE SURE TO RETURN TO 
COURT AT YOUR APPOINTED 
TIME. FAILURE TO APPEAR IS 
A SEPARATE, SERIOUS OF- 
FENSE FOR WHICH YOU CAN 
RK PINED AND SENT TO JAIL. 



BE SURE TO REMAIN IN 
CONTACT WITH YOUR LAWYER 
AND GIVE HIM AN ADDRESS 
WHERE HE MAY REACH VOU. 
IT IS IMPORTANT TO STAY IN 
CONTACT WITH VOl R 
LAWYER. 



WHAT HAPPENS IN DISTRICT 
COURT*.' 

You may be found innocent and 
allowed to go free. 

The court may send your case to 
the grand jury and will do so in all 
very serious felonies 



You may be convicted. If so you 
may have to pay a fine or to serve a 
sentence. Fines may be paid in 
installments if you cannot afford to 
pay all at once. 



You may appeal your case and 
have a new trial in the superior 
court where a jury hears your 
case If you pleaded "guilty ", you 
may appeal only the amount of the 
fine or the length of your jail 
sentence to superior court. 

If you were not represented by a 
lawyer when you pleaded guilty, 
you have a right to withdraw or 
change the plea at any time before 
you are sentenced. 





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Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1972 



Movie, T.V. Highlights, Theatre 



Movies 
UMass Summer Film Programme, 
Campus Center Auditorium 

"One Potato, Two Potato": 7 p.m.; 
"A Raisin in the Sun": 9 p.m. 
Amherst Folklore Center, Spring 
Street 

Beatles Movie, see advertisement 
for times and dates. 

Academy — 

"Dirty Harry" 7 & 9 
Calvin — 

"Skyjacked" 1:30-7:00-9:00 
Amherst Cinema — 

"101 Dalmatians" 1:30-7:00 

"Swiss Family Robinson" 2:50-8:25 
Campus Cinema 1 — 

"Play It Again Sam" 7 8.9 
Campus Cinema 2 — 

"Clockwork Orange" 7:00-9:15 
Campus Cinema 3 — 

"Erotiron" 7 & 9 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 1 — 

"Paint Your Wagon" 2:00-9:00 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 2 — 

"Puppet on a Chain" 1:45-7:15, 

"Straw Dogs" 9:15 
Showcase — 

"Duck You Sucker" 2:00 7:30-10:00 
Showcase — 

"War Between Men & Women" 
2:00-7:409:50 
Showcase — 

"Portnoy's Complaint" 2:00-7:30- 
9:40 
Showcase — 

"Fuzz" 2:00-7:309:30 
Showcase— 

"The Godfather" 2:00-8:00 
Red Rock — 

"The Stepmother" & "Chain Gang 
Women" 
Deerfield — 

"The Stepmother" & "Chain Gang 
Women" 
Majestic — 

"Parlor Games" & "Room 11" 
Hadley Drive-in — 

"Boxcar Bertha" "Pick up on 101" 
8:30 



TV HIGHLIGHTS 

Thursday, July 6 

8:00 P M. What About Police 
Brutality? (3) Police brutality as 
viewed through the yes of some of 
Hartford's victims. Jean Shepards 
America (24) - First in a 15-week 
series looking at America. 

9:00 P.M. "Night Must Fall" (3, 7, 
10) 1964 British thriller starring 
Albert Finney. Rated as "fair" by 
viewers. 
Friday, July 7 

8:30 P.M MOVIE: "Matchless" (4, 
20, 22, 30) 1966 Italian thriller with a 
super hero and low rental fee. 



Consumer News 



8:30 P.M. BASEBALL: Yankees 
meet the Twins in a melodrama for 
tl.e right to lose (18). 
8:30 P.M. MOVIE: "Los Olvidados" 
(24, 57) - Superb film on poverty and 
crime. 
9:00 P.M. ELIZABETH R (3) - First 
in the Emmy Award winning series 
now for non UHF/Cable vision 
/iewers. 

Saturday, July 8 

1:30 A.M. MOVIE: "The Sub- 
terraneans" (3) - Leslie Caron and 
George Peppard fail in their attempt 
to act out Kerouac's novel. Decent 
viewing if you don't want to read the 
book. 

2:10 P.M. BASEBALL (8, 10, 40) 
Dodgers vs. Mets. Mets teach 
Brooklyn team what it means to 
move out of New York. 
2:15 P.M. BASEBALL: (18) 
Yankees vs. Twins. 

2:15 P.M. BASEBALL: (4, 20, 22, 
30) - Cubs vs. Reds 
4:30 P.M. MOVIE: "Tarzan and His 
Mate" (7) - Johnny Weissmuller 
shows the benefits of male 
chauvanism. 
5:00 P.M. TENNIS: Wimbleton (4, 
20, 22, 30) - Intense excitement as 
over a million viewers watch a ball 
travel back and forth over a net. 
5:00 P.M. SPORTS: Chess and the 
Olympic Trials (5, 8, 40) - Will Bobby 
Fisher have appeared in Finland? 
5:00 P.M. RACING: Suffolk Downs 
(27) - A chance to see what the crime 
commission has been talking about. 
8 00 P.M. ALL IN THE FAMILY (3, 
7, 10) - A new member of the Bunker 
family is introduced. Should be ex- 
cellent viewing. 

8:00 P.M. MOVIE: "The Deadly 
Affair" (5, 8, 40) - James Mason stars 
in a spy thriller rated "good" by 
viewers in 1967 and "excellent" by 
the stations renting the flick. 
9:00 P.M. MOVIE: "Topaz" (4, 20, 
22, 30) Hitchock's version of a Uris 
book. Good Saturday night en- 
tertainment. 

10:00 P.M. DEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL TELETHON (5, 8, 40) - 
Bankrupt and split party pools all of 
its celebrities to raise funds prior to 
the convention nominating Hum 
phrey or Goofey. 

10:00 P.M. ROBERTA FLACK 
SPECIAL (57) Repeat of a very 
good performance on PBS. 
1:00 P.M. MEET THE PRESS (4, 20, 
22, 30) 2 hr. specit with McGovern, 
Humphrey, Muskie, Jackson, 
Chisholm, and Wallace. Promises to 
be equal to a three-ring circus with 
denunciations from one and all. 

1:30 P.M. TENNIS: CBS to $3,000 
Classic. (10) Skill is emphasized in 
order to make the viewers feel that 



they are not wasting their time. 

3:00 P.M. AAU INTERNATIONAL 
CHAMPIONS (3, 7) - Swimming, 
track, and field events are em- 
phasized in this 90-minute regular 
special. 

3:00 P.M. MOVIE: "Go West Young 
Man" (22) - 1936 Mae West comedy. 
Worthwhile if not overly cut. 

3:30 P.M. ISRAEL MUSEUM (4) - 
Excellent tour of an excellent 
museum in Jerusalem. 

4:30 P.M. TENNIS: CBS Classic (3, 
7) - More of the same. 

4:30 P.M. ROBERTA FLACK (24) - 
A third chance for those who missed 
it before. 

5:30 P.M. CIRCUS (5) - Acts from 
Yugoslavia, an appropriate alter- 
native to the Democratic Convention 
on all other stations. 

7:00 P.M. PEOPLE GAMES (4) 
Gloria Steinem 

7:30 P.M. ROLLIN' ON THE 
RIVER (27) Jose Feliciano sings. 

8:00 P.M. FIRING LINE (24, 57) - 
Buckley confronts Galbraith on his 
McGovern views. 

8:00 P.M. ROLLIN' ON THE 
RIVER (27) - Ike and Tina Turner 
sing. 

9:00 MOVIE: "Smoky" (5, 8, 40) 
Fess Parker shows us in only two 
hours that he is a good 'Davey 
Crockett' and not much else. 
10:00 EVENING AT POPS (24, 57) - 
Arthur Fiedler renders a pleasing 
evening of music. 
Monday, July 10 

8:00 P.M. MEN'S OLYMPIC 
TRACK AND FIELD TRIALS (5, 8, 
40) 

8:00 P.M. SPACE BETWEEN 
WORLDS (24,57) - Documentary on a 
family communication gap. Ex- 
cellent viewing. 



Announced Convention and 
Convention-Related Programs 

SATURDAY 

12:30 P.M. (3, 10) What's a Con- 
vention All About?: Walter Cronkite 
with a primer for children. 
10 P.M. (5, 8, 40) Democratic 
National Telethon: An all-star appeal 
for funds, scheduled to run through 
Sunday, 9 P.M. (with breaks at 11 
P.M. tonight, and 1 and 5 P.M. on 
Sunday). 
SUNDAY 

11:30 A.M. (10), 12:30 P.M. (3), 2:30 
P.M. (7) Face the Nation: Pre 
convention show 
1:00 P.M. (4, 20, 22, 30) Meet the 
Press: A two-hour edition with Sens. 
George McGovern, Edmund Muskie, 
Hubert Humphrey and Henry 
Jackson, Governor George Wallace; 



and Rep. Shirley Chisholm. 

1:30 P.M. (5, 8, 40) Issues and An- 
swers: Pre-convention interviews 
are scheduled. 

5:00 P.M. (4, 20, 22, 30) Convention 
preview with John Chancellor and 
David Brinkley. 

5:00 P.M. (8, 40) Convention '72: a 
preview. 

6:00 P.M. (3, 7, 10) Campaign '72: 
Pre-convention report. 

6:30 P.M. (24, 57) Anatomy of a 
Convention: Sander Vanocur and 
F Robert MacNeil report. 

8:00 P.M. (24, 57) Firing Line: 
William F. Buckley Jr. and John 
Kenneth Galbraith debate. 
MONDAY 

7:00 A.M. (3,7) CBS Morning News: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 A.M. (4, 20, 22, 30) Today: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 P.M. (3, 4, 7, 20), &:30 P.M. (10, 
22, 24, 30, 57), 9:30 P.M. (5, 8, 40) 
TUESDAY 

7:00 A.M. (3,7) CBS Morning News: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 A.M. (4, 20, 22, 30) Today: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 P.M. (3, 4, 7, 20), 7:30 P.M. (10, 
22, 24, 30, 57), 9:30 P.M. (5, 8, 40) 



Plays and Musicals 

Arena Civic Theatre, Greenfield 
(Phone 773-7991) 

"The Boy Friend": July 6-8, 13-15. 
Mount Hoiyoke College, South 
Hadley (Phone 538-2406) 

"You're A Good Man Charlie 
Brown": July 6-8. Curtain time 8:30. 
Springfield Free Theatre, Forest 
Park (Phone 596-6490) 

"Lysistrata" by Aristophanes: 
July 7, 8, 14, 15. Curtain time 8:30. 
Storrowton Musical Theatre, West 
Springfield (Phone 732-1105) 

"Last of the Red Hot Lovers": July 
6-9; "This Was Burlesque": week of 
July 10. 

Williamstown Summer Theatre, 
Williamstown (Phone 458-8146) 

"Mary Stewart": July 6-8. 



Security Deposit Swindles 



Along with the usiul complaints 
of faulty air conditioning, 
mosquitoes and traffic jams, 
summer brings yet another 
headache to the apartment 
dueller. "Can I get ny security 
deposit back'.'" is a common worry 
in these months preceding the 
termination of many apartment 
leases The Consumer Protection 
Division warns that a few 
measures taken in advance may 
assure the tenant his right to as 
much as two months rent. 



A security depsoit is money paid 
at the time the lease is signed. This 
amount indemnifies the landlord if 
his tenant damages the property or 
"skips town". 

Most landlords are honest in 
returning security deposits. In 
most cases, the security deposit is 
kept only if there is actual damage 
or if the tenant has abrogated the 
terms of the lease. 



A few unscrupulous landlords 

take advantage of a population of 

«r' • and other transients, 

hat ' pon termination of 

- v I be hundred of 
m n court at ' ,i 



These landlords use two types of 
subterfuge in a rather lucrative 
practice. First, upon receiving 
notification that his tenant is 
leaving, the landlord announces his 
plans for inspecting the apartment 
once vacant and promises to 
forward the check. Often the 
deposit is not forthcoming and the 
individual has little recourse. 



The second tactic is to assess 
damages which are really apart- 
ment wear and tear. For example, 
some landlords have been known to 
deduct portions of the security 
deposit for rug cleaning, wall 
painting, or a mysterious 
"maintenance fee" never men- 
tioned in the original lease. 



Tenants may avoid security 
deposit problems by: 

1 ) Abiding exactly by the terms 
of the lease agreement. When the 
lease states clearly "No pets", 
owning a cat or dog is grounds for 
the retention of your deposit. Even 
if the landlord has knowingly 
allowed you to own the pet in 
violation of the lease, he may still 
legally keep the security deposit. 
Verbal or tacit ; toratiofl ol 
terms of the legg '■ I ici 



Music Theatre Workshop, 170 Elm 
Street, Hoiyoke (Phone 788-0258) 

"You're A Good Man Charlie 
Brown": July 6-8. Curtain time 8 
p.m. 

Dance 

Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, 
Becket (Phone 243-0745) 

Matteo and the Indo American 
Dance Company; Claude Kipins 
Mime Theatre (Selections from 
"Men and Dreams") 

Music 

Tanglewood, Lenox (Phone 637-1600) 

July 7: 7 p.m. — Piano music of 
Mozart; 9 p.m. — Seiji Ozawa con- 
ducts a Mozart program. 

July 8: 10:30 a.m. — Open 
rehearsal; 8:30 p.m.— Bruno 
Maderna conducts, 
Gabriel/Maderna "La Battaglia", 
Brown "Available Forms No. 1", 
Ives Tone Road #1 and 03, Mozart 
"Juniper Symphony" 

July 9: 2:30 p.m.— Seiji Ozawa 
conducts Haydn Symphony 047, 
Beethoven Concerto 03, Garrick 
Ohisson conducts Ravel "Ma mere 
I'Oye". 
UMass Programme Council 

July 6: JOSHUA RIFKIN, Pianist 
8:00 p.m. Bowker A-uditorium 
(Lecture/demonstration at 12:30 on 
the Campus Center Concourse) 

July 10: 6:30 p.m. MAHAVISHU 
ORCHESTRA with John 

McLaughlin, Metawampe Lawn 
(Student Union Ballroom). 

Exhibitions 
UMass 

July 6-30 Pen and ink drawings of 
the American Indian THE OLD 
ONES by Walter J. McCurdy. 

July 6-15: REFLECTIONS, 
photographs by John Smith, Student 
Union Art Gallery 1-6 p.m. Sunday 
thru Friday. 

July 7-9: Photography Exhibition 
and Competition by New Englan.dk 



Council of Camera Clubs, CftlflfpM 
Center Music Listening Room. 



Come Join Us 
Room 127 C.C. 



Last of the Red Hot Lovers 



Any changes in the lease should be 
either deleted or circled with a 
notation and initialled by both 
parties. 



2) Understanding that most 
leases contain tax escalation 
clauses. Massachusetts law 
requires that the tenant pay for 
any increase. 



3) Giving written notice at least 
thirty days in advance of the last 
rental period. For example, if each 
rental period begins and ends on 
the first of the month and you plan 
to leave on the fifteenth, notice 
must be given by the first of the 
previous month. This should be 
sent by registered mail, receipt 
requested. 



4) Asking the landlord to inspect 
the apartment as close to the 
vacating day as possible. Obtain a 
list of damages and the estimated 
cost of each. If there are no 
damages, request a written 
statement to that effect. 

The Consumer Protection 
Division reminds apartment 
dwellers to be aware of deceptive 
rental practical in order to avoid 
them 



WEST SPRINGFIELD, Mass. - 
Neil Simon's long-run hit, "Last of 
the Red Hot Lovers" will open at 
Storrowton Musical Theatre, for 
one week only, beginning Monday, 
July 3, starring Milton Berle, 
Peggy Cass, Phyllis Newman and 
Barbara Sharma. 

This is the ninth winner in 
Simon's unbroken chain of suc- 
cesses, now numbering eleven, 
beginning with "Come Blow Your 
Horn" and extending through 
"Barefoot in the Park", "The Odd 
Couple ", "Plaza Suite", and 
currently on Broadway, "The 
Prisoner of Second Avenue." 

"Last of the Red Hot Lovers" 
pokes fun at, and compels sym- 
pathy for the 47-year-old seafood 
restauranteur, Barney Cashman, 
who feels that the only way to 
justify 23 years of marital fidelity 
is to join the sexual revolution. 

Barney decides to set himself up 
for philandering in his mother's 
vacant apartment. With seduction 
on his mind, but not in his heart, 
Barney has three encounters, the 
first, a married client, the second, 
a whacked-out. would-be actress, 
and the third, an old friend who is 
married to an old friend, who 
enjoys life only 8.2% of the time. 
Barney never makes it with any 
of them, partly because he has not 
more agility for adultery than he 
would for tennis, and partly 
because he is a thoroughly decent 
man whose conscious renders him 
virtually impotent. 

Richard Watts of the New York 
Post writes that Neil Simon em- 
phatically lives up to his position as 
the most brilliant writer of 
i omedies in America with "The 



Last of the Red Hot Lovers." This 
play, in three episodes, is 
delightfully hilarious and witty as 
well as filled with the wisdom 
about human nature which is 
characteristic of all his work. Time 
Magazine calls his humor the 
distilled hangover of the American 
dream. 

Tickets and information for 
"Last of the Red Hot Lovers" and 
all of the Storrowton Theatre 
productions can be obtained at the 
Storrowton box office located at 
the site of the orange and green 
tent on the Exposition grounds or 
by calling 732-1101 in the Greater 
Springfield area or 522-5211 in the 
Greater Hartford area. 

Clockwork Orange 

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University of Massachusetts 



July It, 1972 



Volume I, issue 4 



'The Threshold Of A Relationship" 





Wallace Wants O'Brien Out 



Democratic Battle Begins 



Bulletin 



At press time. Senator George 
McGovern had just been awarded 
all of the 271 delegates from 
California, thereby guaranteeing 
him the Democratic nomination 

for President. 

MIAMI BEACH. Fla. (July 10>-A 
peace move by Edmund S. Muskie 
fell flat Monday as battling 
Democrats headed into the start of 
their 1972 nominating convention 
split down the middle over the 
California delegations. 

Setting himself up as a con- 
ciliator, the Maine senator invited 
all eight declared candidates for 
the presidential nomination to sit 
down together in advance of the 
curtain raising and compromise 
the fractions dispute over 151 
contested delegates. 

But the front-running George S. 
McGovern saw in the offer traces 
of a stop-McGovern move and 
boycotted the session when he 
could not get it opened to the press 
and to delegates. 

Only three other contenders, 
Sens. Hubert H. Humphrey and 
Henry M. Jackson and former Gov. 
Terry Sanford of North Carolina 
appeared and Muskie called the 
meeting off. 

The Maine senator said he was 
disappointed but there now seemed 
to be no alternative to "a collision 
on the floor." 

Muskie disputed the McGovern 
camp's report that the meeting 
was to be closed. He said he was 
willing to meet McGovern's 
request that newsmen be present. 
The others. Humphrey, Jackson 
and Sanford, nodded their heads in 
agreement. 

"This is potentially a very 
divisive climate." Muskie said of 



the atmosphere just before the 
start of the convention. 

Humphrey agreed. "A political 
convention that ends up in a 
political hassle is no good for the 
party." he said. 

The Minnesota senator was 
openly critical of McGovern. 
"We're supposed to be leaders," 
Humphrey said. "McGovern not 
only should be here, he has an 
obligation to be here." 

But McGovern, his hopes for a 
first-ballot nomination already 
buoyed by two favorable 
parliamentary rulings and signs of 
support from uncommitted 
delegates said the Maine senator's 
offer showed traces of a stop- 
McGovern movement and he 
would have no part of it. 

"I really see nothing to be gained 
at a closed meeting of this kind," 
McGovern told a news conference 
an hour after Muskie voiced his 
proposal on national television and 
party chairman Lawrence F. 
O'Brien set the hour at 1 p.m. 

McGovern aides said Muskie 
apparently wants to reach some 
compromise on the California 
squabble but they wouldn't play 
ball with him because they feel 
McGovern is entitled to all 151 
disputed delegates. Besides, they 
said, implicit in any compromise 
would be a loss of some of these 
votes. 

Muskie canceled his proposed 
negotiating session when only 
Sens Hubert H. Humphrey and 
two far back candidates, Sen. 
Henry M. Jackson of Washington 
and former Gov. Terry Sanford of 
North Carolina, turned up to talk. 

Muskie said the session would 
have been pointless without all the 
candidates. 

Even while Humphrey agreed to 
parley, he pressed his campaign 



tor a convention showdown on 
California. 

Party officials said the 
credentials session that begins 
about 9 p.m. after convention- 
opening formalities at 7:30 could 
run all night and perhaps until 
early afternoon Tuesday. 

Muskie the fallen front-runner 
from Maine, launched his futile 
compromise effort by urging 
negotiations for the sake of 
Democratic unity. 

He urged the presidential rivals 
to talk it out face to face, lest their 
battles over who can vote at the 
convention serve only to split the 

(Continued on P. 3) 



Students share in Indian ceremony. 

White Roots; 
Indian Culture 



The White Roots of Peace is a 
unique experience in American 
culture. For Indians, their 
message is one of hope and en- 
couragement for the traditionalists 
through revitalized Indian strength 
and unity. For the non-Indian the 
White Roots provides an op- 
portunity to hear the Indian's 
views of peace and relationships 
with the environment. 



Film Review 
on Page 3 



The all-day program of 
American Indian culture will be 
offered by the UMass Summer 
Program tomorrow The program 
is entitled "White Roots of Peace 
The Mohawk Nation at Ak 
wesasne". The Akwesasne 
reservation, one of the six Mohawk 
Nation reservations, is the home of 
approximately 6,000 Mohawks, 
half of whom are under 18 years old 
and located half in New York state 
and half in Canada. While many 
have become christianized, those 
who have held on to the Indian 
ways, have paid a price for their 
belief. They have been harassed as 
pagans, the U.S. and Canada 
refuse to recognize the validity of 
its political system, and education 
is often considered anti- 
progressive. "White Roots of 
Peace" is a communications group 
which has traveled over 200,000 
miles in the United States and 
Canada to provide an experience 
through their traditional 
messages, dances, songs and 
films. They have visited over 150 
colleges and universities, church 
groups, high schools, prisons and 
Indian groups sharing their an- 
cient practices (including crats, 
singing and dancing, language). 



The day's activities will consist 
of an exhibit Indian Arts and Crafts 
and sale of crafts, photographs and 
books: a film festival and a main 
meeting, with audience par 
ticipation. The sale and exhibit will 
take nlacc in the Campus Center 
Music Listening Room from 10:00 
a.m. to 10:00 p.m. The film festival 
will be presented in the Campus 
Center Auditorium from 1:30 p.m 
to 5:00 p.m The program will 
consist of several short films 
(including "You Are on Indian 
Land". "Home of the Brave ", and 
"These Are My People ". etc.) and 
a feature film, "Blood of the 
Condor". 

The high point of the program 
will be the main meeting, 
scheduled for 8(H) p.m. to 10:00 
p.m. The meeting, which will be a 
combination of Indian prayer, 
dancing and singing, prophecy, 
religion, history, values, ecology, 
etc., will be held on Metawampe 
Lawn ( between the Campus Center 
and the Student Union), weather 
permitting. Rain location for the 
evening's event is the Campus 
Center Auditorium. The evening 
meeting will deal with current 
issues, traditional messages and a 
coffee hour will follow im- 
mediately after the meeting in the 
Campus Center Music Listening 
Room. 

The "White Roots of Peace" 
activities are open to the public 
without charge < but in the case of 
the film festival and the rain 
location for the main meeting, if 
necessary, UMass summer 
students holding I.D.'s will be 
admitted first). For further in- 
formation on this and other 
Summer Program events, please 
contact the Student Activities 
Office in the Campus enter at 545- 
2351. 




President Robert Wood (center) and Library Director Merle Boy bin watch Chancellor Randolph 
Bromery at yesterday's University Library Dedication. The building will open in February. 



P age Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 

r 



TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1972 



TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1972 



The Crier is a semi-weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in the Campus Center, 
Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for the contents. No 
copy is censored by the administration before Publication. Represented for 
national advertising by National Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 

FINE ARTS 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

Elleni Koch 

Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



Art Buchwald 



An Act Of God 



Campus Carousel 

Bikes, Bad Grades 

By TONY GRANITE 

THEFTS OF BICYCLES on the campus is a nationwide plague. And 
reports in the campus press dramatize it. Like the coverage at Illinois 
State by The Vidette. 

Of the 104 reported thefts there, Campus Security recovered only 25. 

The Bicycle Institute of America offers these suggestions to bike 
owners: Lock the bike to a stationary object with a chain no less than 
three-eighths inches in diameter. 

Lock the bike in a conspicuous place. Run the chain through both 
wheels and the frame, with quick-release front wheels placed at the rear 
before running the chain through. Record serial number, take a color 
picture of the bike, and insure. Register the bike with the local police 
department. 

NEW EDITOR of Georgia State's Signal is offering a new challenge to 
the campus. He writes, "I have seen the paper report conflict between 
.aministration and students; blacks and whites; radicals and con- 
servatives; Greeks and independents... The conflict was not manufac- 
tured by the reporter. It existed as it was reported, in most cases. 

"...I would like to offer to the university staff, students and ad- 
ministrators a challenge... to implement the things that bind this 
University together into the happenings here so thoroughly that the news 
which reflects those happenings can be of the concensus school of 
history." 



"F" GRADE FALLS at the College of William and Mary, according to 
intelligence shared by the UVa Daily Cavalier. 

Instead, the undergrads m the college of arts and sciences will receive 
thenotaion "NC" (no credit) for unsatisfactory completion of any course. 

A 10-page report approved by the faculty said "the present system of 
grading is geared too much to recording what the student did not do... the 
committee feels that the primary function of grades on a student's 
academic record should be to indicate what has been achieved." 

C.EQ. 

The Flooding River 



WASHINGTON -The news that 
the United States has been secretly 
seeding clouds in Vietnam to in- 
crease and control the rainfall for 
military purposes has reper- 
cussions far beyond the war in 
Indochina. 

For one thing, it opens up an 
entire new dimension in warfare 
and could cause all sorts of dif- 
ficulties not covered by the Geneva 
Convention, the SALT talks or any 
treaties now in existence. 

I went to the Pentagon to find out 
what it all meant. No one was 
willing to talk about the United 
States' rainmaking abilities except 
my friend, Orlando. He was very 
defensive about it. 

"I don't think there is anything 
wrong with dropping rain on the 
enemy. For years we've been 
raining bombs on them, and it 
didn't work. So now we've decided 
to bomb rain. If we can get them in 
a quagmire, we can win the war." 

"But what about the in- 
ternational repercussions of 
bombing rain on people? Surely the 
Soviets, and even the Chinese, 
have rainmaking machines which 
they could use against us." 

"We are not making rain against 
the Soviets and the Chinese. We are 
only making rain against the North 
Vietnamese. They know that in 
Moscow and Peking." 

"But it could rain on Russian 
ships and Chinese advisers in 
Vietnam." 

"We are using smart rain 
bombs," Orlando countered. 




"They are programmed to hit only 
military targets. We have a laser 
beam that zeros in on a target, and 
then the rain is released. It's 
possible that an occasional civilian 
can be hit by the rain, but we are 
doing everything to see that no 
civilian gets wet." 

"There is something wrong 
about this, Orlando," I said. "It 
seems to me that making rain in a 
war is a very serious thing." 

"Wouldn't you have us drop rain 
on the enemy rather than bombs?" 
he asked. 

"But you've been dropping both 
bombs and rain," I protested. 

"Next question," Orland said 
angrily. 



seed clouds over the United States 
during the World Series? Would we 
consider this an act of war?" 

"The Russians wouldn't dare 
because we could seed clouds over 
Siberia. We could flood everything 
from Vladivostok to the Black Sea. 
They know it." 

"Well let me ask you this. This 
has been the worst year for rain in 
the history of the United States. It 
coincides with the discovery that 
we are making rain in Indochina. 
Is it possible that some Air Force 
planes have been practicing on 
us?" 

"That's absurd," Orlando said. 
"Our training flights have never 
used anything but dummy rain 
seeds. I can say unequivocally that 
the Pentagon is not responsible for 
any of the rain we've experienced 
in the United States." 

"Suppose someone else has been 
seeding the clouds around the 
United States-let's say the French 
or the Canadians. What can we do 
about it?" 

"We have no intelligence that 
any foreign power is behind this 
year's rainfall. Every story we 
checked out has been an act of 
God." 

"And in Indochina?" 

"In Indochina it's an Act of 
Congress." 

"An act of Congress?" 

"Of course, stupid. Read the Gulf 
of Tonkin Resolution." 



"Suppose the Russians decide to Copyright 1972, Los Angeles Times 



The Coalition for Environmental 
Quality will have a free film shown 
on Tuesday evening at 6:30 p.m. in 
Rooms 162-175 of the Campus 
Center. The film "The Flooding 
River" is a half-hour color and 
sound explanation (with much 
beautiful photography) of the life 
cycles supported by the Con- 
necticut River. It discusses the 
processes which are harmed bv 




Letters 




Yes, do send in your comments 
on campus life, international af- 
fairs, national emergencies, etc. 
All we demand is that all letters to- 
the-editor be typed on a sixty-space 
line, one side of each page, double- 
spaced. 



pollution and out-of-basin diversion 
of waters. 



The summer steering committee 
of the Coalition will have a meeting 
after the discussion period to 
follow the film and anyone in- 
terested in ecology-environment 
issues is invited to stay and listen 
or become involved if you wish. 
One topic to be discussed will be 
the possibility of getting volunteers 
to keep some office hours at the 
C.EQ Office in Room 124 so that 
the files on environmental issues 
may be available to students for 
term papers, or reports. The 
resources available in the office 
are enormous, but in order to be 
available, there must be someone 
there to help people and keep an 
eye on everything. 



WORLD 
CHESS 

CHNKPIONSHIP 
RFdUWlKJCQAND 




'MR. FISCHER SEEMS TO BE READY NOW 



SHAH WE COMMENCE, MR. SPASSKY?' 



Toward Student/Faculty Partnership In Governance-Part I 



(This is Part I of a position paper by the 
Student Government Association.) 

In adopting, with the ACE and AGB, the 
1966 Statement on Government of Colleges 
and Jniversities. the AAUP Council 
reported that "continuing joint effort is 
desirable, in view of the areas left open in 
the jointly formulated statement, and the 
dynamic changes occurring in higher 
education." 

The major "area left open" was students, 
as Trustee Chairman Joseph P. Healey 
pointed out in his letter to the Faculty Senate 
on December 29, 1971. "The document by its 
own terms, he said, "does not adequately 
provide for student participation in the 
governors < process." 

In fact, students were and continue to be 
the principal force behind the "dynamic 
changes" mentioned by the AAUP. In- 
creasingly, students have gained a genuine 
sense of responsibility for academic 
policies, and can now claim substantial 
credit for much of the academic innovation 
and reform that has taken place in recent 
years, Each new entering class has a better 
>ense of what it wants and needs to learn 



Some of the progressive steps students can 
claim credit for include: the B.D.I.C. 
program, the growth of independent study, 
residence-based academic programs such 
as Project Ten, teach evaluation, 
liberalization of requirements, and the 
renewed emphasis on public service. None 
of these programs, designed to adapt the 
university to the future as well as the past, 
would have been possible without student 
initiative and pressure. Students have been 
the principal opponents of institutional 
autocracy wherever we have found it. We 
have published an endless stream of ignored 
reports on grading, curriculum reform, and 
other crucial issues. All of these develop- 
ments indicate increased student 
sophistication, awareness, and vision for the 
future of education. 

Few students are satisfied with our 
education, but we have few real avenues for 
channelling that dissatisfaction into con- 
structive efforts for change. Many of our 
criticisms may be unjustified, but it is 
difficult for us to judge when we are on the 
outside looking in. Those who have tried to 
act have found that very little can come of 



their efforts "outside the system." Literally 
hundreds of students have joined the student 
government hoping to effect educational 
policy, only to drop out in despair at the 
futility of their efforts. 

It should be the responsibility of the 
university to seize upon student vitality as 
the crucial force behind education. To the 
extent that students are docile or feel 
helpless, the university has failed in its 
mission To the extent that students can only 
vent their dissatisfaction with anger and 
hostility, the university has also failed. The 
true mission of the university can only be 
achieved as students gain a sense of self- 
worth, intellectual vigor, and control over 
our own lives. 

The 1966 Statement hardly acknowledges 
that we exist at all in the university. 
Whatever acknowledgement students do 
receive, we are regarded merely as the 
passive receptacles of faculty wisdom or as 
pawns to be manipulated by master plan- 
ning committees It is no wonder that 
students rebel from such treatment and turn 
to such popular literature as Jerry Farber's 
Student as Nigger, which characterizes 



students with the telling metaphor of slaves 
on a plantation. 

While the statement purports to advocate 
"interdependence" among the components 
of the university, it then makes a fantastic 
leap of logic by saying: "The faculty has 
primary responsibility for such fun- 
damental areas as curriculum, subject 
matter and methods of instruction, 
research, faculty status, and those aspects 
of student life which relate to the 
educational process." In other words, we 
are reduced to second-class citizenship 
when it comes to those matters that will 
most directly effect our lives and futures. It 
is students who have the most to gain n 
educational policy is progressive and 
enlightened, and the most to lose if policy is 
regressive or destructive. Faculty status is 
not threatened by poor teaching, a grading 
system that inhibits learning, or a 
curriculum that gives us few skills or per- 
spectives for future living, since the 
faculty's future depends far more on peer 
evaluation of research and popularity 
Students, however, are the unwitting vic- 
tims of the educational policies determined 
by the faculty. 



72-73 Indexes Merge Review 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Three 




The Blood of the Condor 



Walter Sobzak. editor of the 1972 Index, the I Mass yearbook, 
questions his bride immediately after their wedding ceremony in 
the Newman Center. The bride is Gail Taylor, a senior, from East 
Longmeadow. Sobzak is from Westfield. Mrs. Sobzak Would have 
been the 19711 editor if the couple did not plan to move away. 



Demo Convention 



(Continued from P. 1) 



party and weaken its prospects 
against President Nixon. 

But McGovern quickly said no. 
He said the decision should be 
made by the convention itself. 

Buoyed by favorable 

parliamentary decisions on the 
rules for a seating showdown. 
McGovern insisted he is entitled to 
all 151 contested California votes 

He won the 271 -vote delegation in 
a winner-take-all presidential 
primary, but his delegate count 
there was trimmed to 120 when the 
Credentials Committee decided the 
votes should be divided in 
proportion to shares of the popular 
vote in California. 

The delegate arithmetic 
illustrated the stake in the 
California seating contest. For if 
McGovern regains his sweep he 
will be within 27 votes of the 1,509- 
delegate majority it will take to 
choose a White House nominee 
Wednesday night. 

In that situation, he could almost 
certainly pick up the rest and so 
fashion in advance of the climactic 
roll call a grip on the nomination he 
has been seeking for 18 months. 

McGovern urged Democrats, 
specifically Humphrey, to unite, 
saying that with the California 
sweep he will gain nomination and 
go on to defeat Nixon on Nov. 7. 

"There is no way this convention 
can close on a note of fairness and 
justice without awarding me every 
one of those 271 delegates," 
MdGovern told farm state 
delegates. "I won that election fair 
and square." 

Hours before the convention 
opened, this was The Associated 
Press count of delegate strength. 

McGovern 1,331.35 
Humphrey 515.30 
Alabama Gov. George C. 
Wallace 388 
Muskie 238.55 
Uncommitted 366.20 

Humphrey's campaign 
manager. Jack L. Chestnut, 
disclosed that the Minnesota 
senator was freeing about 90 black 
delegates pledged to him to vote 
for Rep. Shirley Chisholm on the 
first convention ballot. 

By offering those delegates to the 
black congresswoman from New 
York, Humphrey clearly was 



RESEARCH 
REPORTS 



on every conceivable 
academic topic 
available. Send $1 for 
free catalog. CN, Box 
24050, LA Cal 90024. 



seeking to embarrass McGovern 
who was holding on to his own 
black delegates. 

At the same time, that ploy was 
an acknowledgement that Hum- 
phrey stands no chance for first- 
ballot nomination. 

O'Brien Asked to Resign 

From the headquarters of a 
fourth candidate, George C. 
Wallace, came a call for party 
chairman Lawrence F. O'Brien to 
resign or ask for a vote of con- 
fidence from the convention's 
delegates. 

Charles S. Snider, the crippled 
Alabama governor's campaign 
manager, said his action was 
prompted by O'Briens rulings 
Sundav on California credentials. 

O'Brien, who will preside over 
the convention, held it would take a 
of those eligible to vote to adopt 
credentials reports and that the 
uncontested members of 
challenged delegations may vote 
on the challenges. 

These rulings could be important 
sources of strength to McGovern. 
If he captures the contested 
California delegates he could be 
lifted to within 50 votes of a first- 
ballot triumph Wednesday night, 
according to The Associated Press' 
tally. 



Labor leaders, never very keen 
on McGovern, slashed at his 
comment last month that he would 
go to Hanoi and beg if he thought 
that would win a release of 
American prisoners of war. 



Translated from AFRICASIA, 
Paris 

Whatever the other side of the 
story may be, a Bolivian film taking 
as a starting point the forced 
sterilization of Indian women by 
U.S. doctors has already had a 
profound effect. The most popular 
film in the nation's history, Jorge 
Sanjines' THE BLOOD OF 
CONDOR implicates the U.S., the 
Peace Corps and the La Paz 
government in an affair of 
genocidal proportions. 

Jorge Sanjines' The Blood of 
Condor (titled "Yawar Mallku" is 
the Quechua dialect in which it was 
originally filmed) sheds a harsh 
light on the fate of the Indians who 
constitute an overwhelming 
majority (65 percent) of the 
Bolivian population. 

The film achieved notoriety even 
before it was shown publicly by 
Bolivia. Its banning by govern- 



"The notion that an American 
president should go begging to 
Hanoi will make sense only to those 
who believe that in the Vietnam 
war all right is on one side, 
Hanoi's, and all wrong on the 
other, ours," said the paper. 

McGovern was criticized also for 
votes against minmum wage in- 
creases, unemployment com- 
pensation and federally supported 
job projects. On civil rights, it said 
he had been absent sometimes, 
wrong other times 



The candidate himself was out 
hustling for delegate votes. He 
stopped off at a women's caucus 
and drew a warm reception when 
he declared that there must be an 
end to U.S. participation in the 
Vietnam War. 



ment censors set in motion a press 
campaign and street 

manifestations of so violent a 
nature that the authorities finally 
relented and allowed it to be 
released. 

Filmed under extremely difficult 
conditions (students, technicians, 
workers and peasants contributed 
some of the necessary funds), The 
Blood of the Condor paints a vivid 
fresco of the day-to-day life and 
customs of the Quechua Indians. 

For those who do not know Latin 
America, certain sequences in the 
film are sure to appear excessive 
and exaggerated— as well as 
"folklore-ish" in the most 
pejorative sense. Yet, the reper- 
cussions the film has brought about 
in Bolivia would seem to illustrate 
just the opposite— that, indeed, it 
reflects only too well the national 
reality at the present moment. 

With great power, the film shows 



the premeditated extermination of 
the Quechua Indians by a crew of 
American doctors who sterilize 
women members of the tribe when 
they come to a recently set up 
modern maternity hospital. In the 
scenes which follow, the silent 
dignity of the Indians contrasts 
greatly with the lachrymose ex- 
planations furnished by the 
American specialists. In the end, 
the Indians are made to pay for 
their defiant gesture with their own 
blood: the leaders of the Quechua 
community are executed in a 
ravine. 

Used as carefully and knowingly 
as it is in this film, the camera 
truly becomes a weapon. Ad- 
mittedly, one film cannot radically 
change the harsh realities of 
Bolivian life— but it bears witness, 
at least, to a struggle being waged 
on many fronts. 



Meat Prices Rising 



Consumers waiting for lower 
meat prices to arrive at super- 
market counters can forget it for 
now. 

If anything, prices will be higher 
on some items next week, ac- 
cording to a spokesman for A&P 
Supermarkets in Springfield. 

Wholesale prices for next week 
show substantial gains for some 
items, the industry source said. 

Other area market owners and 
wholesalers agree. Removal of the 
quota on meat imports will not 
have a dramatic impact on meat 
prices in the foreseeable future. 

The country could not get enough 
frozen foreign meat to fill the 



the world meat market which 
caused inflation at home, Lavin 
said. 

He said prices for foreign meat 
may increase too in the next few 
months. 

"If there had been a lot of meat 
just waiting to come into this 
country, the impact would have 
been noticed immediately," Lavin 
said. 

"I've been trying to buy im- 
ported veal leg and calves liver. I 
need them and I can't get them," 
Lavin said. 

The retailers haven't noticed any 
difference in the markets, and at 
this point don't know what will 



existing quota last year, Frederick happen, Robert Fuller, manager at 



G. Lavin, vice president of 
Springfield Beef Co., said. 

Other countries are bidding for 
meat creating the same kind cf 
supply and demand pressures in 



in 



Shop Rite Supermarket 
Springfield, said. 

The situation in the industry is 
the same as it was before 
President Nixon lifted the import 
quotas. 



Interest on Rent Security Deposits 



BOSTON-Legislation sponsored 
by State Representative John W. 
Olver (D-Amherst) and passed by 
the Senate today would require 
landlords to pay interest on rent 
security deposits. 

The bill now awaits the signature 
of the Governor before becoming 
law. 

Under Rep. Olver's proposal, if a 
tenant holds a lease for a year or 
more, the landlord must pay in- 
terest back to the first day of 
tenancy. For a stay of less than a 
year, there would be no interest. 

According to Rep. Olver, the bill 
will serve two purposes. He ex- 
plained, "This act will give lan- 



dlords incentive to turn back the 
whole security deposit to tenants 
who have been responsible for a 
long period of time. 

"Thus, good tenants will now be 
rewarded." 

Olver, a candidate for State 
Senate, added, "The legislation 
also should stop the practice of 
landlords arbitrarily keeping 
security deposits without justifying 
any alleged damage. Under the 
bill, any damage must be itemized 
and proven with an actual bill of 
payments." 

Olver indicated the bill was a 
partial compromise of previous 
legislation passed by the House 



and Senate, but subsequently 
changed by the Governor. Rep. 
Olver, expressed confidence that 
the Governor would approve the 
measure. 

Rep. Olver is a second term State 
Representative from Amherst and 
the Second Hampshire District. 



r 



-^ ■ 

A CULTURAL EXPERIENCE WITH 


"White Root 


s of Peace" 


... a North American Indian communications group 


WEDNESDAY, 


JULY 12, 1972 


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS: 




Campus Center Music Listening Room 
10 a.m. — 10 p.m. 


Exhibit & Sale 

Indian Crafts, Photographs, & 

Books 


Campus Center Auditorium 
1:30 p.m. — 5 p.m. 


Film Festival & Feature Film, 
"Blood of the Condor" 


Metawampe Lawn 

(Rain: Campus Center Auditorium) 

8 p.m. — 10 p.m. 


Main meeting with audience 
participation 


Campus Center Music Listening Room 
10 p.m. 


Coffee hour 



EXCLUSIVE SHOWING 

DterfeM D 



Th»otrt 



Ru 



5 & 10 So. 0..rf,.ld 
6658746 

Now • Ends Tues. 
Charles bronson 
Ursula Andress 



The Greatest Fighting Machine 
The West Has Ever Known 




[PQ] a NATIONAL GENERAL /g\ 



PICTURES RELEASE 
TECHNICOLOR^ 



sie ve McQue en 

LEMANS- 



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W«d, Thun, Sun. Men. Tuh 



Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1972 



TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Five 




Joshua Rifkin-"Yawn* 



"Jacques Brel" 

at West Springfield 



"Jacques Brel is Alive and 
Well and Living in Paris" is 
one of the most popular shows 
to hit off-Broadway in a long 
time It has played at the 
Village Gate in New York for 
nearly five years, and in 
Boston for nearly two years. 
The Music Theatre Workshop 
of West Springfield, will 
present this very special show 
the week of July 12-15. It is 
composed of the words and 
music of Jacques Brel. one of 
the most reknown songwriters 
and performers in Europe. The 
songs predominate (there are 
26 ) but they are of a variety of 
style and depth unparalled in 
any other show Brel has much 
to say about love, loneliness 
and alienation, but the show is 
balanced by sparkling num- 
bers in the style of the old 
English music halls. The 
combination has the power to 
stir an audience to almost a 
frenzy of emotion. It is the 
special genius of Brel to expose 
the painful side of life, yet 
make it livable. 



Music Theatre Workshop 
was established in 1972 to 
provide experience in all 
aspects of theater arts for 
college and high school 
students majoring in music 
and drama. Most of the 
company members are college 
students from the Springfield 
and Boston area who have an 
unusual depth of experience in 
theater. 

The comDanv is entirely 



dependent on ticket sales and 
contributions to carry out its 
program. Individual seats are 
only $2 and $3, and special 
rates are available for 
reserved in advance groups of 
more than five. The theater is 
located at the Mittineague 
Methodist Church at 800 
Amostown Road in West 
Springfield. Call 788-0258 for 
further information. 



■ 




■- f 



"Jacques Brel" cast (left to rt: John Hartford, Kathleen Konkol, 
l.ibbv Trudell and Joe Konkol). 



Newport Festival in N.Y.C. 



The Newport Jazz Festival is in 
New York City to stay, George 
Wein. the festival's producer, said. 
He said it would not return to the 
uncertainties and tumult of its 
place of origin at Newport, R.I. 

"I have no plans for going back 
to Rhode Island again." Mr. Wein 
said flatly "The Newport Jazz 
Festival-New York is now a per- 
manent, annual event." 

The cherubic promoter spoke 
before one of the last events of the 
nine-day festival, which will close 
tonight with a 7 P.M. concert in St. 
Peter's Lutheran Church in 
Manhattan. 

He said it appeared the festival 
would turn a thin profit. 



somewhere from $10,000 to $40,000. 

"We're going to finish in the 
black this year," Mr. Wein said. 
"We're not going to be in the red. 
The subsidies we got from our four 
companies made the difference. 
Without the subsidies, we would 
not be in the black." 

The festival brought 600 jazz 
musicians together for concerts in 
Carnegie and Philharmonic halls, 
Yankee Stadium, Radio City Music 
Hall, on three Hudson River 
cruises and at street festivals in 
Harlem and Brooklyn. 

One of the richest feasts of the 
festival was served up outdoors 
yesterday to a thin crowd at the 
rear of the Brooklyn Museum on 
Kastern Parkway Unlike other 



DOUBLE FEATURE FILM SERIES 



One Potato 
Two Potato 



7 p.m. 



A Raisin 
In the Sun 

Starring 
Sidney Poitier 



9p.m. 



Tuesday, July 11 
Campus Center Auditorium 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 



events that ran about 6 a seat, it 
was free. 

Mr. Wein said he believed the 
expatriate festival would become a 
growing national tourist attraction 
in future years as a fixture of the 
New York City summer scene. 

The festival is likely to stretch 
over 10 days next year, with 
possibly one day out of the middle 
to allow everybody to "catch their 
breath", Mr. Wein said. 

Two sell-out audiences for 
midnight jam sessions in the Radio 
City Music Hall, compared to thin 
audiences for many afternoon 
concerts this year, seemed to show 
a public preference for nighttime 
jazz. That is likely to be honored 
next year by starting the concerts 
at 7 P.M. and 11 P.M. in Carnegie 
and Philharmonic Halls instead of 
this year's S P.M. and 9 P.M 
starting times 



"We don't know where our basic 
audience is." Mr Wein said "We 
haven't tapped the black com- 
munity yet The Yankee Stadium 
concerts have not drawn what I'd 
hoped, and they should really be 
the big populist event of' the 
festival They re not pure jazz but 
the more commercial product, and 
that should have drawn them ." 

Although relatively few 
teenagers have frequented the 
performances. Mr Wein took hope 
in the way that youths rushed up to 
him after several concerts and 
hugged and thanked him profusely 



Review-Rifkin 



HO-HUM 



By ELLEN1 KOCH 

The jazz and ragtime pianist, 
Joshua Rifkin, was the solo feature 
last Thursday evening in Bowker 
Auditorium. The concert, "free" to 
UMass Summer Students (student 
taxes funded this event) became 
rather monotonous as Rifkin 
played only piano rags by Scott 
Joplin. though Joplin was the best 
composer of ragtime music. But 
even though the technique was 
good, the syncopations just right, 
the footwork fun to watch, it was 



obvious that much of the audience 
had had enough of the same, 
witnessed by the number of 
walkouts during intermission 
Rifkin ought to have included some 
classical jazz along with the 
ragtime for a more diverse and 
less disappointing concert. 

The next event requiring tickets 
is the Chuck Davis Dance Com 
pany on July 20. Summer students, 
keep in mind that your taxes have 
already paid for tickets, and Davis 
should be well worth the effort of 
picking up those tickets. 



Best 



Performs 

Thursday 



Martin Best, minstrel, will 
perform in concert in the lower 
gardens adjacent to the Infirmary 
Thursday. The concert begins at 8 
and will be held in Memorial Hall if 
the rain continues. 

Best supposedly recreates an- 
cient ballads and troubador 
chansons. According to Colbert 
Artists Management Inc.. Best 
"has revived the art of the Min- 
strel." 

He uses a lutek. concertino, and 



guitar, "each song being jewel-set 

in the framework of its time," they 
say. 

Best became the official 
guitarist of the Royal Shakespeare 
Company of England in 1965. He% 
has also performed solos in Great 
Britain and the United States. 

"Martin Best's programs have a 
unique quality," rather than being 
individual songs, each adds "to an 
overall creative experience." 



1 1 



The Boy Friend ' ' 



GREENFIELD, MASS.— Sandy 
Wilson's happy little musical about 
the 2()'s on the Riviera continues 
for the second and last week at 
Arena Civic Theatre at the 
Roundhouse on the Fairgrounds 
Performances are Thursday 
through Saturday at 8:30 p.m. 

A live jazz band composed of 
Jane Russell of West Hartford, 
pianist. Bob Laramie of Green- 
field, percussionist and Al Ben- 
jamin of Sunderland, saxzrphone- 
clarinetist is a highlight of the 
production. 

Professional colortura soprano 
Mariann Poyer, of Northfield, is 
starring as Madame Dubonnet. 
The ingenue Polly is played by Kit 
Sweeney of Greenfield and the 
juvenile by Barry Wendell of 
Northampton. 



This is the second production this 
summer of Franklin County's only 
summer stock company. It will be 
followed by "Happy Birthday, 
Wanda June". "The Importance of 
Being Earnest" and a double bill of 
Arthur Miller's "A Memory of Two 
Mondays" and "Bea, Frank, 
Richie and Joan" (from "Lovers 
and Other Strangers"). 

All seats are reserved and ticket 
information may be had by calling 
413-773-7991 daily except Sunday 
between 3 and 8 p.m. 



The place that made Amherst 
famous. 

DRAKE RESTAURANT 

Village Inn 

RATHSKELLER 
85 AMITY 253-2548 

Open 11 a.m. — 2 a.m. 



EXHIBIT and SALE 

of 

Original Prink 

from 
International Artists Ltd. 

prints from $10.00 

Wednesday 

July 12, 1972 

I 1 a,m. to 7 p.m. 

Campus Center 
Concourse 




Review- Tanglewood 



Music And Jeans 



"No we can't, It will break Victor's heart," exclaims Amanda, Fontaine Syer, as she and Elyot, Jim 
Cacanaugh, plot to escape their respective spouses in Noel Coward's PRIVATE LIVES, presented by 
the Mount Holyoke College Summer Theatre Tuesday, July 11 through Saturday, July 15 at 8:30 p.m. in 
the tent-on-the-green of the College campus. 



By ELLENI KOCH 

Tuxedos and evening gowns at 
Tanglewood? They were present at 
last Friday night's concert of 
music by Mozart, but so was a 
faded blue, ripped sweat shirt from 
Potsam State, wherever that is. 
The young man with the sweat 
shirt was also wearing a red 
bandana holding down his long 
hair. With mink capes juxtaposed 
to quickly-crocheted shawls and 
old blue jeans, the clothing scene 
indicated quite a variegated crowd 
with at least one common bond, the 
love of good music, specifically 
Mozart. However, the lure of 
Tanglewood is not only the music, 
but also the setting in the lushly 
green hills of the Berkshires. The 
area gently coaxes the roman- 
ticism out of everyone's heart. 
One's head is able to rest, the soul 
is soothed; one need only to relax, 
not a difficult task at Tanglewood. 

While strolling through the well 
kept grounds during the free hour 
between the 7 o'clock Weekend 
Prelude of piano music by Mozart, 
and the regular concert at 9 
o'clock, I was amazed at how 
formal a picnic could become. One 
party of eight was elegantly sitting 
around a fancy paper tablecloth 
spread on the thick carpet-like 
lawn. Their outdoor feast seemed 



to be composed of a sumptuous 
nine course meal, complete with 
wine. However, for those who 
desired not to prepare edibles in 
advance, reasonably priced snacks 
and adequate tables were 
available. 

As usual, the concert started 
precisely on time. Doriot Anthony 
Dwyer's low and mellow sounds on 
her flute played with the idyllic and 
well-differentiated notes of Ann 
Hobson's harp in Mozart's Con- 
certo for Flute and Harp, a rare 
solo combination. 

The second piece, the Bassoon 
Concerto, was more interesting. 
Bassoon lovers seldom hear this 
instrument in a solo so this was 
quite a treat, especially since the 
performance was executed by the 
excellent Sherman Walt, who 
received a partial standing ovation 
for his virtuosity. 

Mozart's Serenade No. 7 in D 
completed the evening's listening 
and viewing pleasure. Joseph 
Silverstein as violin soloist com- 
manded complete attention of both 
visual and auditory senses, for his 
technique was marvelous to watch. 
Cradling the violin, it seemed as if 
every stroke of the bow was a 
caress, with a beautiful sound for 
every movement. 



"Private Lives" At Mt. Holyoke 'Company' Opens 

SOUTH HADLEY. Mass-Noel Coward's bitinc Gertrude Lawrence. Tallulah Bankhead, and most Ml J JL 



SOUTH HADLEY, Mass-Noel Coward's biting 
humor and witty way with the relationships between 
men and women are the fare for the third captivating 
production of the Mount Holyoke College Summer 
Theatre's third season as the Company presents his 
Private Lives Tuesday, July 11 through Saturday, 
July 15 in the tent on the green of the College campus. 

Coward is at his best in the intimate and urbane 
comedy of Elyot Chase, who, while honeymooning 
with his second wife, finds himself in the same hotel 
with his former wife, the spirited Amanda, who also 
happens to be on her second honeymoon. The old 
flame immediately rekindles and sparks begin to fly 
in every conceivable direction. Walter Kerr called 
Private Lives "a gleaming and gleeful comedy," and 
the show has enjoyed three successful Broadway 
runs. 

Joining the ranks of such stars as Noel Coward 
himself and Laurence Olivier, Jim Cavanaugh, 
Producer/Director of the Summer Theatre, will play 
a major role for the first time in the tent. Fontaine 
Syer, Assistant Producer/Director, will follow 



Gertrude Lawrence, Tallulah Bankhead, and most 
recently Tammy Grimes as Amanda. Bruce Starin, 
who was Mr. Toad in The Wind In The Willows and 
Marco in last summer's Carnival, and Taubey 
Shedden, who has appeared in major roles in both 
Laboratory Theatre and Summer Theatre shows, 
most recently the female lead in The Hostage, round 
out the cast as the new spouses. 

Directed by Sandy Shinner, director of The Wind In 
The Willows and assistant director for the Laboratory 
Theatre production of The Hostage, Private Lives is 
sure to be one of the brightest shows of the summer. 

Running Tuesday, July 11 through Saturday, July 
15, Private Lives will be produced in the green-and- 
white striped Summer Theatre Tent. Tickets at $2.50 
and $3.50 for adults with a $1.00 discount for students 
may be reserved by telephoning (413) 538-2406 from 
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. daily except Sunday. Follow 
Route 116 to South Hadley and look for the Summer 
Theatre signs. Come early and enjoy the music of the 
company's wandering minstrels, or take a walk 
around the lovely country-like campus. 



at Storrowton 



WOPE pool will be 
open from 1-2 p.m. 



Mon., Tues. and 



Wed. for rest of 



summer school for 



lap swimming only! 



Potato, Raisin, Tonight 



Tonight's double feature film 
series presentations include "One 
Potato, Two Potato", and "A Raisin 
In the Sun", both to be shown in the 
Campus Center Auditorium. 

in 'Potato', which runs 92 
minute, interpersonal relation 
sjujjjs^ wjhena^ whj^edi^grcee 



5-College 
Info 

545-2566 



marries a black man are shown. 
This film will start at 7 tonight. 

At 9, the story of the dreams and 
frustrations of a black family 
which receives a $10,000 insurance 
check will be presented. Sidney 
Poitier stars in this 2-hour film as 
the family member who sees the 
money as a chance to raise himself 
from the ghetto. 

Both movies are free, but seating 
priority will be given to UMass 
Summer Session students. 



"Company," the multiple-award 
winning musical of 1970 will open 
at Storrowton Musical Theatre, for 
one week only, beginning on July 
10. George Maharis and Vivian 
Blaine will co-star in this musical 
which comments on marital, pre- 
marital, un marital and ex-marital 
relationships in a contemporary 
urban setting. 

"Company" was written by 
George Furth with music and 
lyrics by Stephen Sondheim who 
also wrote the music and lyrics for 
"A Funny Thing Happened On The 
Way To The Forum". 

One of the latest in the line of 
smash hits directed and produced 
by Hal Prince, "Company" is a 
comedy based on the subject of 
marriage. 

Robert, the central figure played 
by George Maharis, is a 35 year-old 
attractive bachelor. Bobby has 
many friends, all married, and all 
wanting him to be married. 

The couples play the game of 
show and tell before their favorite 
pasttime, Robert. Each one has a 
particular dilemma that they let 
Robert in on - such as drinking, 
smoking and gaining weight. 
Robert remains aloof. 

Throughout the show, Robert is 
bombarded with women who are 
trying to find a nice girl for him. He 
meets and seduces an airline 
hostess, and tries to seduce two 
other girls on a park bench. 



Vivian Blaine, the co-star in 
"Company" will portray Joanne, a 
much-married woman with a 
roving eye, who has been 
everywhere and seen everything. 

George Maharis, who portrays 
Robert, is a native New Yorker. He 
served for three years in the 
Marines following high school and 
returned to civilian life intent on 
becoming a singer. 

Tickets for "Company" and all 
the Storrowton Theatre produc- 
tions are available at the 
Storrowton box office located at 
the site of the orange and green 
tent on the Exposition grounds. 
Reservations and ticket in- 
formation are available by calling 
732-1101. 

1 Another Family' 
Shown Tonight 

The Center For Social Change is 
sponsoring the showing of the film, 
Another Family For Peace on 
Tuesday evening July 11th in 
rooms 804-808 in the Campus 
Center. The film is concerned with 
the reactions of six families who 
initially supported the war, but 
changed their opinions as the 
result of losing someone close to 
them. The film will be followed by 
a discussion. Evervone is invited. 




No Automotive Rip Off's 
SPENCER'S Mobil STATION 

161 NO. PLEASANT ST., AMHERST ( Next to P.O.) 

FREE ESTIMATES 
Open 24 hours — Road Service — 256-8426 



View from balcony of newly dedicated University Library. Center is Fine Arts complex under CM 
struction. School of Business in background. 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1972 



UMass Receives Grant Hashish, Used Moderately, 



For Oceanic Projects 



The National Science Foundation 
has announced the award of a 
$145,000 grant to UMass for a long 
range study of two ocean-oriented 
concepts for generation of elec- 
trical power at reduced pollution 
levels. 

The investigation will be done by 
a faculty-student team in the 
departments of civil engineering, 
mechanical engineering, chemical 
t ngineering, electrical engineering 
and general business and finance. 
The team is led by Professor 
William E. Heronemus, associate 
head of the civil engineering 
department. 

One part of the study centers 
about the D'Arsonval-Claude 
process, first developed in 1929, 
which uses ocean temperature 
differences as a power source. The 
thermal differences between the 
warm surface layers of the oceans 
and the huge body of near-freezing 
water just underneath can be used 
to drive heat engines and thence 
generators. 

The Gulf Stream and the Gulf of 
Mexico offer opportunities to the 
United States to use this solar-fed 
energy resource," Prof. 
Heronemus said. "The total energy 
demand of the country could be 
met by this process alone. The 
study will attempt to identify the 
most practical and economic 
system suitable f >r large-scale 
application." 

The second part of the study 
involves ocean cooling of nuclear 
power plants. By locating nuclear 
central stations in or on cold sea 
water, thermal pollution or 
evaporative wastage of ground 
water resources can be halted. 
There is already a commercial 
venture underway to guild a barge- 



mounted nuclear plant behind a 
breakwater off the New Jersey 
coast, the plant floating in 50 feet of 
water. The UMass team will 
examine the pros and cons of going 
farther out to sea in somewhat 
deeper, colder water. 



The $145,000 grant will support a 
preliminary 18-month paper study 
of these two concepts which could 
develop into a much larger 
analysis and laboratory effort on 
behalf of pollution-free energy 
systems. The work grows out of a 
1971 effort by 32 UMass faculty led 
by Prof. Heronemus which 
culminated in the identification of 
three major pollution-free energy 
sources and three concepts for 
modifying present-day power 
generation practices which could 
reduce thermal pollution and 
conserve fuel. The grant covers 
initial work on two of those areas. 

The team includes Professors 
Lawrence L. Ambs, Clayton R. 
Adams, Stanley M. Bemben, 
Meyer Wm. Belovicz, G. Marc 
Choate, Frederick J. Dzialo, 
William Goss, Peter A. 
Mangarella, John J. McGowan, 
Elmer C. Osgood, Lee H. S. Roblee 
and Lester C. VanAtta. Six 
graduate research assistants will 
also be involved. 



Professor Heronemus is an 
active member of the Office of 
Science and Technology Com- 
mittee on Energy Research and 
Development Goals, serving on the 
Solar Energy Panel. He is also 
leading a nation-wide effort to 
renew interest in large-scale usiutf 
windpower as a sizeable substitute 
for dependence upon increased 
foreign oil imports and the 
plutonium reactor. 



Found To Cause Few Ills 



By BOYCE RENSBERGER 

A three-year study of 720 regular users of hashish, 
the concentrated resin of the marijuana plant, has 
shown that persons who smoke moderate amounts, 
equivalent to three or four marijuana cigarettes a 
day, suffered few mental or physical ill-effects other 
than a mild respiratory ailment known as "hash 
throat." 

However, heavy users, who consumed the 
equivalent of 17 to 200 marijuana cigarettes a day, 
suffered a variety of ill-effects, including a "chronic 
intoxicated state characterized by apathy, dullness 
and lethargy with mild-to-severe imnairment of 
judgment, concentration and memory.*' 

In a small number of cases, symptoms resembling 
schizoprenic psychoses persisted months after 
discontinuing hashish use. 

The study, conducted among United States troops 
stationed in West Germany, is among the first close 
observation of a large number of persons using 
hashish over a relatively long time. 

The study is significant because, as marijuana 
smoking becomes relatively commonplace in 
American society, the use of more potent 
preparations of the same active chemical has been 
increasing. 

Most of the concern about marijuana's effects has 
focused not on the use of the relatively mild 
preparations available on the street, for which few ill 
effects have been shown, but on the long-term use of 
the more potent hashish. 

Whereas marijuana generally contains its active 
ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, in con- 
centrations under 1 percent, the THC level is hashish 
ranges from 5 to 10 per cent. 

The study, which is reported in the current issue of 
the Archives of General Psychiatry, was conducted 
by two military physicians, Maj. Forest S. Tennant 
Jr. and Maj. C. Jess Groesbeck, both of the Marine 
Corps. 

The researchers noted that in West Germany, 
unlike the United States, the only available 
preparation from the marijuana plant is hashish. 

They also reported that surveys in 1970 and 1971 of 
5,300 American soldiers in West Germany disclosed 



that about 46 per cent had smoked hashish at least 
once and 16 per cent smoked it regularly at least 
three times a week. 

"Compared to usual United States standards of 
cannabis (the scientific name of the marijuana plant) 
consumption, the abuse of hashish by many 
American soldiers in West Germany is mammoth," 
Majors Tennant and Groesbeck wrote. 

The study of psychiatric effects of hashish is based 
on repeated examinations over three years - from 
September, 1968, to September, 1971 - of 720 soldiers 
who came to the United States Army Hospital in 
Wurzburg for various mental and physical ailments. 

It should be noted that the researchers did not study 
a cross-section of all hashish users but only those who 
suffered some ill-effect and either sought help or 
were referred by their commanders. 

In the population served by the hospital, there 
should have been about 5,760 soldiers who used 
hashish regularly. The vas majority, it may be 
presumed, suffered no ill-effects. 

During the three years in which the hsopital was 
the only one available to the 36,000 American troops 
stationed in the area, 115 hashish users suffered acute 
schizophrenic reactions, the most severe effects 
encountered. Of these, 112 men had been using other 
drugs as well, including LSD, amphetamines and 
alcohol. 

The military doctors said that the three who used 
only hashish had, in their medical records, "con- 
siderable evidence that latent schizophrenia 
probably pre-existed." 

Of the 720 men in the study, 110 were heavy users, 
smoking from 50 to 600 grams of hashish a month for 
periods of three to 12 months. This is equivalent to 
smoking 500 to 6,000 marijuana cigarettes a month. 

All 110 displayed symptoms of psychiatric im- 
pairment, the doctors reported. "Physical ap- 
pearance was stereotyped in that all patients ap- 
peared dull, exhibited poor hygiene and had ulightly 
slowed speech. So apathetic were many patients that 
they lost interest in cosmetic appearance, proper 
diet, and personal affairs such as paying debts, job 
performance, etc." 

(Reprinted from the New York Times) 



TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1»72 



Olver Sponsors Wage Increase 



THE MOUNT H0LY0KE COLLEGE 




SUMMER THEATRE South Had ley, Mass. 

proudly presents 
the intimate and urbane 

by Noel Coward 

Tues. — Sat. July 11 — 15 at 8: 30 p.m. 

Tickets $2.50 and $3.50 

students $1 off any ticket 

BOX OFFICE open io a.m. —9 p.m. Daily Except Sunday 

Phone (413) 538-2404 

Coming: ANY WEDNESDAY July 18-22 



BOSTON- The Massachusetts 
House has approved State 
Representative John W. Olver' s 
(D-Amherst) measure to increase 
the state minimum wage. The 
proposal now goes on to the 
Governor for his signature. 

The measure raises the state 
minimum wage for most oc- 
cupations from the present $1.75 an 
hour to $1.85 an hour. 

However, a Senate amendment 
to Rep. Olver's original proposal 
passed by the House, made 
members of the manufacturing 
industry unqualified for the in- 
crease. 



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The Senate passed an amend- 
ment which stated that the 
manufacturing industries would 
not benefit from the state increase, 
until the industry's federal 
minimum reached the state level. 

Olver, a candidate for State 
Senate, commented, "I cannot 
understand why the Senate insists 
on keeping in this provision. I 
cannot imagine that the 
manufacturing industry would be 
unable to afford such an increase. 

"A wage of $1.85 an hour comes 
out to around $3600 a year, which 
may include 1% of the total 
manufacturing work force. As it is, 
this is still below welfare levels, 
and is inadequate. We must make 



working more worthwhile than 
welfare." 

Olver indicated that he would file 
legislation for next year's 
legislative session, which would 
include all workers in any in- 
creases in minimum wage. 

He added, "I am sorry we were 
forced in the House to accept this 
Senate amendment. However, the 
lateness of the legislative session 
made it important to get at least a 
version of the bill passed. This 
increase even with the amend- 
ment, will benefit a great number 
of our state's workers." 

Olver is a second term state 
representative from Amherst, 
representing the Second Hamp- 
shire district. 



Headline 



ADVERTISING COPY 



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Call 665 4513. 


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7/11 


O 


Two Raleigh touring bicycles, 




men's, 3 speed 23" frames, 3 






month's old, $ 100 the pair or best 






offer. Will trade for 1 8 or 10- 






speed, 256 8432. 






7/11 




1964 Chevrolet Impala Con- 




vertible, good condition, contact 






Larry at 549-6676 or leave 




D 


message at Crier office. 


ft 


FOR RENT 


Two bdrm apts for immediate 


rental, $185//v\ incl utilities. Call 


VI 


Resident AAgr 665 4239, if no 


■H 


answer 1 786 0500. 


r 


SSIFI 


8/15 


> 


PERSONAL 


to 

to 


FREE Monthly Bargain Price 


List of Coins for the investor, 


^ 


beginner or advanced collector. 


Tl 


a 


Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207-T, 


^ 


Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 


^■B 


-J 


8/15 


m 


u 




* 






The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 



Youth Warned on Drug Laws 



The following are Intramural Program special deadline an- 
iioiH-eimMits: 

SI MMKR INTRAMURAL VOLLEYBALL 

Women's and (.'o-Kec Volleyball entries due Thursday. July IS. 

Men's, Women's and Co-Rec Horseshoe (& Women's Badminton) 
entries are also due Thursday, July 13. 

Obtain entry forms at Boyden Intramural Office #215. Com- 
petition will run from July I7-August 11. 

SIMMER INTRAMURAL SOFTBALL 

Women's and Co-Rec Softball entries due Thursday. July 13. 



Fall Parking Fee $5 



The Fall 1972 vehicle registration 
forms are now available in the 
following locations: #1 booth 
(Whitmore Area), IS booth (Hills 
North), #4 booth (North Dining 
Commons Area). #5 booth (Boyden 
Gym Area), #6 booth (Engineering 
Area), Parking Office, 103 Hamp- 
shire House. 

The vehicle registration fee for 
the next academic year is as 
follows: $5 per each vehicle, $2 per 
each replacement vehicle. 



Astro-Cast 



Without love, Capricorn constantly 
searches, lacks fulfillment. With love, 
Capricorn is creative and a world-beater 
Capricorn may appear cold on the sur 
face, but natives of this zodiacal sign 
crave love and need a private cheering 
section. Capricorn is physically attracted 
to Taurus, holds lively discussions with 
Pisces, has unique relationship with Leo, 
gets into legal disputes with Cancer, 
lakes long journeys with Virgo, makes 
money with Aquarius and secret 
arrangements with Sagittarus. Capricorn 
seldom forgets and is capable of 
achieving success against tremendous 
odds. Some famous persons born under 
this zodiacal sign include Sal Mineo, 
Frank Sinatra Jr., Dizzy Dean, Ethel 
Merman and Floyd Patterson. 
• • • 

ARIES (March 21 April 19): Young 
person who makes money demands is 
merely letting off steam. Refuse to be 
intimidated. In affair of heart, find out 
where you stand Don't be a doormat for 
any person. Check policies, special ac 
counts. 

TAURUS (April 20 May 20): Strive to 
harmonize relationships. Protect 
security. Don't give up something of 
value for mere promise. Check creden 
tials. Trust intuition. Inner feelings 
provide valid guide. Act accordingly. 

GEMINI (May 21 June 20): Don't take 
others too seriously. Some relatives, 
neighbors display tendency to carry 
gossip. Have fun • leave details for 
another time. Dine out Make social 
contacts Expand horizons. Get overall 
view 

CANCER (June 21 July 22): Show 
retraint where money affairs enter 
picture Avoid basing actions on impulse. 
Study fine print read between the lines. 
Dealings indicated with Leo, Aquarius 
and Scorpio individuals. 

LEO (July 23 Aug. 22): Avoid rushing. 
Take special care in traffic. Don't argue 
with relatives Be receptive to ideas 
which retain personal principles. Change 
of scenery is on agenda. News received 
concerning property 

VIRGO (Aug. "i Sept 22): You receive 
encourageme r .i irom surprise source. Be 
flexible and receptive Strive for greater 
family harmony. You may be spending 
more money than originally anticipated 
But you will have something of value. 

LIBRA (Sept 23 Oct. 22): Don't sign 
promissory notes. You require additional 
information What appears a fine deal 
could have (laws Take time to analyze. 
See persons, situtions as they actually 
exist. Avoid wishful thinking. 

SCORPIO (Oct 23 Nov. 21): Action 
occurs m areas dealing with ambition, 
career, standing in community. This can 
be a power period. You get more 
responsibility, a chance also for greater 
reward and recognition. Go to it! 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 Dec. 21): You 
complete phase of activity Apply 
finishing touches. Deal with Aries. Throw 
sff burden not rightly your own Be 
sympathetic toward one who confides 
oroblem But don't bcome inextricably 
involved 

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 Jan 19): New 
start indicated Leo is in picture. Stress 
initiative in transforming wish into 
reality Promises of friends may not hold 
water What you accomplish will be up to 
you Savings program needs attention 

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 Feb 18) Ideas 
need more development. Avoid jumping 
to conclusions One close to you is im 
patient. Don't compound error. Cancer 
individual plays key role. Heed inner 
voice Give full play to intuitive intellect. 

PISCES (Feb. 19 March 20): Stress 
versatility Have alternative plan 
available Broaden concepts Look 
beyond the immediate. Be aware of 
ootential Avoid extremes Moderate 

f>ace should be advocated Accept social 
nvitation 

IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY you 
have unique wayof capitalizing on talents. 
You are attractive to opposite sex, will 
have more than one opportunity for 
marriage Augus' should be your most 
siqmficant month of 197? You will have 
many dealings w fh Aries. 

Copyright 1972. Gpn Fea Corp 



1 



Registration forms must be filled 
out completely and returned to the 
Parking Office Before August 15, 
with a check or money order 
payable to the University of 
Massachusetts. 

Lot assignments will be deter- 
mined and bumper stickers will be 
mailed to the mailing address 
which you provide. Address should 
be printed directly below the space 
provided for your name on the 
parking application. 

Please fold forms to fit a 9 1/2" x 
4 1/2" business envelope; enclose 
your check and mail to the Parking 
Office, 103 Hampshire House, 
University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01002 

"Please fold forms to fit a 9 1/2" 
x 4 1/2" business envelope; enclose 
your check and mail to the Parking 
Office, 103 Hampshire House, 
University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01002," 
says the Parking Office. 



The presence of nearly 1,000 
American youth in foreign jails on 
drug charges has prompted a 
public service advertising cam- 
paign to warn Americans traveling 
abroad to avoid drug-law 
violations while visiting other 
countries. 

All of the material warns 
travelers that drug laws in other 
countries are generally strict and 
rigidly enforced. Pointed out also 
are some differences in the 
jurisprudence system. For 
example, some countries permit no 
appeals from lower courts. Some 
have no bail system. Pre-trial 
detention in some countries is 
lengthy. 

The public service campaign is 
sponsored by the National 
Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse 
Information in behalf of the White 
House Special Action Office for 
Drug Abuse Prevention and other 
concerned Federal agencies in 
cooperation with the advertising 
agency Vansant, Dugdale, Inc., 
Baltimore, and The Advertising 
Council. 

Print material relies on a 
straight summation of drug laws in 
20 selected countries in which most 
Americans travel. Included for 
each country are the address and 
telephone number of the U.S. 
Embassy. The material points out, 
however, that Embassy officials 
can do little once an American is 
charged with drug law violations in 
another country. 

Gerald N. Kurtz, Associated 
Administrator for Com- 
munications and Public Affairs, 
Health Services and Mental Health 
Administration, and coordinator of 
the project, said the campaign is 
being undertaken partly because 
there seems to be wide misun- 
derstanding among American 
youth about foreign drug laws and 
their enforcement. 

He said this misconception is 
encouraged sometimes by what 
seems to be widespread use of 
drugs overseas and the easy 



availability of mind-altering 
substances in many foreign 
countries. And he added that many 
drug dealers play a double game 
by tipping off police as to 
Americans to whom they have 
made drug sales, i this way, they 
get money from the user and the 
police. American narcotics agents, 
Kurtz said, have told him this is 



Urica. 

Preparatory to production of the 
public service material, Mr. Kurtz 
and representatives of the Van- 
sant, Dugdale Agency visited 
jailed Americans in Spain, Italy, 
Greece, and Iran, and also talked 
to numerous young American 
visitors to these countries. 



Crossword Puzzle 



Answer to Last Issue's Puzzle 



ACROSS 

1 Worm 

4 Shy 

9 Ventilate 

12 Once around 
track 

13 Angry 

14 Prefix: 
before 

15 Fuss 

16 Artist's 
stand 

17 Fondle 

18 Conjunction 
20 Besmirch 
22 Dampens 

24 Footlike part 

25 Memorandum 

28 Guido'shigh 
note 

29 Succor 

30 Deep sleep 

31 Old- 
womanish 

33 Begin 

34 Anoint 

35 Declare 

36 Scottish for 
"John" 

38 Sacred image 

39 Uncooked 

40 Transaction 

41 Commonplace 

43 Torrid 

44 Aeriform fluid 
46 Platform 

48 Newt 

51 Lubricate 

52 Downy duck 

53 Confederate 
general 

54 Work at one's 
trade 

55 Portions of 
medicine 

56 Unit of 
Japanese 
currency 

DOWN 

1 Guido's high 
note 

2 Mournful 

3 Instinctively 

4 Row 



9 
10 
11 
19 
21 

22 
23 

24 

26 
27 

29 
30 
32 
33 



Man's name 

Gathered into 

a group 

Newspaper 

paragraphs 

Erase 

(printing) 

Fittingly 

Anger 

Soak 

Bone 

Ox of 

Celebes 

Pronoun 

South African 

antelope 

Baker's 

product 

Sum 

Teutonic 

deity 

Beverage 

Pigpen 

Evils 

Carpenter's 

tool 




34 Three toed 
sloth 

35 Dinner course 

(Pi) 
37 Compass point 

39 Proportion 

40 Conjunction 
42 Employed 



12 



22 
35" 



34 
5T 



51 

57 



23 



31 



45 



T 



18 




41 



32 




29 



42 



39 



20 



35 



38855 



33 



47 



8 



43 Possessive 
pronoun 
Republican 
party (init.) 
Be ill 

Command to 
horse 
Toll 
Number 

w 



44 

45 

47 

49 
50 




30 



43 



21 



40 




36 



26 



49 



11 



27 



37 



50 



Dutr. by United Feature Syndicate, Inc. ?■< 




Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1972 



MOVIES 

July ll-"Another Family for Peace" 
presented by the Center for Social 
Change, Campus Center Rooms 804- 
8, evening (time not announced). 
July 11 "The Flooding River", 
presented by CEQ, 6:30 p.m. Campus 
Center Rooms 162-75. 
July 11 "One Potato, Two Potato", 7 
p.m., "A Raisin in the Sun", 9 p.m., 
UMass Summer Film Programme, 
Campus Center Auditorium. 
July 12 "Blood of the Condor" 
presented by the WHITE ROOTS OF 
PEACE, 1:30-5 p.m., Campus Center 
Auditorium. 
Academy — 

"Dirty Harry" 7 8. 9 
Calvin — 

"Skyjacked" 1:30-7:00-9:00 
Amherst Cinema — 

"101 Dalmatians" 1:30-7:00 

"Swiss Family Robinson" 2:50-8:25 
Campus Cinema 1 — 

"Play It Again Sam" 7:00-9:00 
Campus Cinema 2 — 

"Clockwork Orange" 7:00-9:15 
Campus Cinema 3 — 

"The War Between Men & Women" 
7 & 9 
Jerry Lewis Cinema — 

"Paint Your Wagon" 2:00-9:00 

"A New Wagon" 7:00 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 2 — 

"Puppet on a Chain" 1:45, 7:15 
"Straw Dogs" 9:15 
Showcase — 

"Duck, You Sucker" 2:00-7:30- 
10:00 
Showcase — 

"War Between Men & Women" 
2:007:409:50 
Showcase — 

"Portnoy's Complaint" 2:007:30- 
9:40 
Showcase — 

"Fuzz" 2:007:30 9:30 
Showcase — 

"The Godfather" 2:00-8:00 
Red Rock — 

"The Stepmother" & "Chain Gang 
Women" 
Deerfield — 

"The Stepmother" & "Chain Gang 
Women" 
Hadley— 

"Boxcar Bertha" & "Pick Up on 
101" 



Highlights 



M S. for M.R. 



TV HIGHLIGHTS 
TUESDAY 

8:30 p.m. EVENING AT POPS (24, 
57) -Doc Sever insen is featured. 

9:30 p.m. JEAN SHEPARD'S 
AMERICA (57)-"The Phantom of the 
Open Hearth lives Somewhere in 
Indians". Second in the series of a 
comedians look at America. 
10:30 p.m. MOV IE" Judgement 
Deferred" (24)-English drama of the 
innocent convict proved innocent. 
WEDNESDAY 

8:00 p.m. THE SUPER (5, 8, 40)- 
First in a new ABC comedy series 
about a New York Superintendent. 
Do not watch if you have ever lived in 
NYC and have had to deal with the 
Super, it ceases to be funny. 

8:00 p.m. FOOTBALL (18)- 
Saskatchewan Roughriders vs. Ot- 
tawa Rough Riders. A healthy 
change from Baseball. 

8:30 p.m. CORNER BAR (5, 8, 40) 
Another ABC comedy first with Alan 
King making fun of th< Mafia. 

8:30 p.m. MOVIE: Film Odyssey 
film series presents classic film 
shorts. This series is usually worthy 
of viewing. 
THURSDAY 

8:00 p.m. JEAN SHEPARD'S 
AMERICA (24)-Same as Tuesday 
9:30 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. HOLLYWOOD 

TELEVISION THEATRE (24, 57)- 
"Picture a police state with no one to 
police...." 
FRIDAY 

5:00 p.m. BASEBALL ( 18)- 
Athletics vs. Yankees. 

8:30 p.m. MOVIE: "The Spiral 
Road" (4)-Rock Hudson and Burl 
Ives star in this 1962 movie. Viewers 
gave it a low rating in that year. 



Announced Convention and 
Convention-Related Programs 

WEDNESDAY 

7:00 a.m. (3, 7) CBS Morning News: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 a.m. (4, 20, 22, 30) Today: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 p.m. (3, 4, 7, 20), 7:30 p.m. (10, 
22, 24, 30, 57), 9:30 p.m. (5, 8, 40), 11 
p.m. (24, 57) 



Join The 

Sensuous 
Summer 
Staff 



This is 
an offer 

you can H 
refuse! 



Come Join Us 
Room 127 C.C. 



July 11-15, Mt. 
South Hadley, 



Third session coverage: Balloting for 
the Presidential candidate. 
THURSDAY 

7:00 a.m. (3, 7) CBS Morning News: 
Convention Reports. 

7:00 a.m. (4, 20, 22, 30) Today: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 p.m. (3, 4, 7, 20), 7:30 p.m. (10, 
22, 24, 30, 57), 9:30 p.m. (5, 8, 40) 
Fourth session coverage: Balloting 
for Vice President; acceptance 
speeches. 
FRIDAY 

7:00 a.m. (3, 7) CBS Morning News: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 a.m. (4, 20 22, 30) Today: 
Convention reports 

8:00 p.m. (24, 57) Washington Week 
in Review: A post-convention report 
is scheduled. 

PLAYS AND MUSICALS 
THE BOY FRIEND, July 13-5, Arena 

Civic Theatre; Greenfield, Phone 773- 

lit i. 

PRIVATE LIVES, 

Holyoke College, 

Phone 538 2406. 

JACQUES BREL IS ALIVE AND 

WELL AND LIVING IN PARIS, July 

12-15, Music Theatre Workshop, West 

Springfield, Phone 788-0258. 

THE EMPEROR'S NEW CLOTHES, 

July 15, Williston Academy, 

Easthampton, Phone 527-1520. 

LYSISTRATA, July 14-15, Springfield 

Free Theatre, Phone 569-6490. 

LAST OF THE RED HOT LOVERS, 

July 11-15, Williamstown Summer 

Theatre, Williamstown, Phone 458- 

8146. 

EXHIBITS 
July 11-30 Pen and Ink drawings of 
the American Indian: THE OLD 
ONES by Walter J. McCurdy. 
July 11-15 REFLECTIONS 

photographs by John Smith, Student 
Union Art Gallery 1-6 p.m. 
July 12 Exhibit and sale of Original 
Prints from Bermond Art Ltd., 11 
a.m. to 7 p.m., Campus Center 
Concourse. 

July 12 WHITE ROOTS OF PEACE: 
THE MOHAWK NATION AT AK- 
WESASNE, Indian Crafts, 

photographs and books, 10 a.m. -10 
p.m., Campus Center Listening 
Room. 



A special woman-oriented issue 
of "The Massachusetts Review" 
has been published this month - 
with all articles by and about 
women. The double-volume edition 
is titled "Woman: An Issue." 

"The Massachusetts Review" 
i "MR" i is published at the 
University of Massachusetts- 
Amherst with the support of 
Amherst, Smith, Mount Holyoke, 
and Hampshire Colleges. "MR" 
enters its 13th year with this double 
number which has been in the 
making since 1970. 

Co-editors of "Woman: An 
Issue" are Mary L. Townsend 
Heath, "MR" asociate editor; Lee 
Edwards, UMass professor of 
English; and Lisa Unger Baskin. 
They have collected poetry, fiction, 
essays, and art reproductions 
which examine or express the 
image of women in literature, 
history, politics, art, and 
education. Among the articles in 
this winter-spring "MR" are: 
"Notes on Feminism" by Anais 
Nin, "Women and Politics" by 
Bella Abzug, "My Mother and 
Politics" by Mary Doyle Curran, a 
section of "Confessions of Mother 
Goose' by Anne Halley, "Reflec- 
tions on the Black Woman's Role in 
the Community of Slaves" by 
Angela Davis, drawings by Lisa 
Baskin. and self-portraits by 
women artists from the 15th 
Century to today. 

In the 1960s." "MR" pioneered 
with the publication of writings on 
black culture, and became a forum 
for black and white writers and 



thinkers of the importance of black 
culture and human rights in the 
United States. With the latest ef- 
fort, "MR" makes a statement on 
the significance of the issue of 
women's rights and the drive to 
recognize the creative and 
scholarly talents of women in a 
male-dominated society. 

"MR" has established somewhat 
of a longevity record in publishing 
for 13 years. Many literary 
magazines of its type last no more 
than a year. "The Massachusetts 
Review" was started in October, 
1959, at UMass-Amherst by UMass 
faculty members and other in- 
terested area residents. In two 
years it had gained support of the 
Four College Area (UMass, and 
Smith, Amherst, and Mount 
Holyoke Colleges). Since then, 
Hampshire College was 
established in Amherst and joined 
in support of "MR". Editors Jules 
Chametzky and John M. Hicks, 
both UMass professors of English, 
have been with the magazine from 
its beginning. The editorial board 
is made up of faculty members 
from the five colleges. 

"MR" is sold at newsstands 
throughout the country and has 
subscribers in various parts of the 
world. The current edition 
• Volume XIII, 1 and 2) may be 
ordered from "MR" editorial 
offices. Memorial Hall, University 
of Massachusetts, Amhersi, Mass. 
01002. This double issue is $3.75. 
Subscriptions are $7 per year in the 
United States, and $8.50 abroad. 



Odometer Inspection Begins 



PITTSFIELD — Inspectors from 
the state Attorney General's 
consumer protection division 
opened an investigation of local car 
dealers Wednesday. 

The move is part of a statewide 
spot check on odometer tampering 
and sale of rental cars as regular 
used cars. 

According to investigators, two 



dealers were screened yesterday, 
and several others will b« picked 
for investigation. 

Joel S. Greenberg of Pittsfield. 
assistant attorney general for 
consumer affairs, said the action is 
routine and he stressed that there 
was no prior evidence of 
wrongdoing on the part of local 
dealers. 



"Indochina Summer" Planned 



A summer-long emergency 
educational campaign manned by 
thousands of volunteers across the 
country has been launched by the 
American Friends Service Com- 
mittee, in an effort to broaden 
support for an end to the war in 
Indochina. 

Called "Indochina Summer," the 
campaign will emphasize the 
economic waste of the war. and the 
current bombing levels, which are 
the highest in the history of war- 
fare. Indochina Summer includes 
three major phases: 

1. An attempt to reach every 
delegate to both the Republican 
and Democratic conventions with 
politically non-partisan 
educational materials about the 
Indochina war. Non-partisan 
presentations will also be prepared 
for the platform committees of the 
parties. 

2. In almost every state, 
volunteers from many neigh- 
borhoods and groups will work in 
their own communities, door-to- 
door and at shopping centers, as 
well as in larger meetings. Special 
effort will be made to strengthen 
anti-war interest among industrial 
workers, businessmen, urban 
residents, and rural people. 

3. In some areas, nonviolent 
demonstrations will focus on In- 
dochina-bound arms and am- 
munition The AFSC noted that 
some individuals who take part 
may feel led to acts of civil 
disobedience under a discipline of 



nonviolence. 

In stating this position, the AFSC 
Board of Directors held that the 
U.S. government is in "clear 
violation" of its own laws, par- 
ticularly the Geneva protocols and 
the Nuremberg statutes. "AFSC 
believes in a society of laws and not 
of men." the statement says, and 
"citizens are confronted with the 
need to bring about the compliance 
with the law on the part of the 
government ." 

Frequently Indochina Summer 
will concentrate on making a 
community aware of defense- 
related material being 
manufactured locally. 

At Army, Navy, and Air Force 
bases around the country, In- 
dochina Summer volunteers will 
distribute literature and talk with 
as many GIs, employees, and 
community people as possible. 

A major educational tool of 
Indochina Summer will be the 
slideshow, "Automated Air War," 
developed by the NARMIC 
research program of the AFSC. It 
exposes the recent technological 
developments in bombing methods 
which have virtually "automated" 
the war. enabling U.S. troops to 
withdraw. 

Indochina Summer volunteers 
will show "Automated Air War" to 
hundreds of thousands of people 
this summer, including par 
ticipants at the national political 
conventions. 

Possible sites for efforts to 



blockade nonviolently shipments of 
arms and ammunition will include 
railroad terminals such as at 
Portland, Oregon, and shipping 
terminals at San Fiancisco; Long 
Beach, California; Bangor, 
Washington. Leonardo. New 
Jersey: and Sunnypoint. North 
Carolina. 

In its statement of support for 
acts of nonviolent civil 
disobedience, the Board of 
Directors of the AFSC deplored the 
recent escalation of bombing in 
Indochina as "in clear violation of 
the higher moral law which we. as 
Friends, are called to obey." The 
statement also noted that U.S. 
action is "in violation of United 
States law at several points," and 
noted that President F.D. 
Roosevelt, in a statement to the 
German people in 1944, "called 
upon every German to take action 
which would show that they 
disassociate themselves from the 
war crimes the German govern- 
ment was committing and, 
moreover, to keep a record of 
evidence that one day will be used 
to convict the guilty'." 

"In this spirit the American 
Friends Service Committee 
organizes programs in which in- 
dividuals who are attempting to 
disassociate themselves from 
these crimes and from the illegal 
actions of its government may 
make nonviolent protests against 
such illegal acts." 



at A Glance 

All day July 12. Metawampe 
Lawn and Campus Center 
Music Room 

C.C. Music Room: 10 a.m. -10 
p.m . exhibit of Indian Crafts, 
photographs, books 

C.C. Auditorium: 1:30p.m. -5 
p.m , Indian films 

Metawampe Lawn: 8 p.m. -10 
p.m. (rain location, C.C. Aud), 
Main meeting 

C.C. Music Room: 10 p.m., 
Coffee Hour 



Bloodmobile, July 25 th 



AMHERST On July 25 the Red 
Cross Bloodmobile will be at the 
VFW headquarters in Amherst 
from 1? noon until 5:45 p.m. 

When a person donates a pint of 
blood at least once a year (not 
more than five times a year ) at one 
of the Red Cross bloodmobiles He 
or she becomes a member of the 
Red Cross program according to 
Red Cross officials. This insures 



the donor and his immediate 
family to all blood needs for one 
year following date of donation it is 
stated. Anyone in good health, 18 
through 65, and weighing more 
than 110 pounds may give. Blood 
collected at this time will be a 
major source of supply for the 
summer months. Appointments 
may be made by contacting the 
Red Cross office in Northampton. 



Best Offers Concert 

In Gardens Tonight 



A concert of lute and guitar music will be offered by 
the UMass Summer Program Thursday, July 13, at 8 
p.m. 

Martin Best on lute and guitar, and Edward Flower 
on back-up guitar, will play outside the lower gardens 
next to the UMass Infirmary. The rain location will 
be Memorial Hall. 

With his recreations of ancient ballads, troubadour 
chansons, and Elizabethan airs, Martin Best has 
carved a new career out of old tradition. 

However, Best does not confine himself merely to 
old music; a program, might begin with the 



traditional, progress through the Elizabeth and court 
music of France and Spain and end with the work of 
contemporary composers such as Stravinsky, Pieter 
van der Stauk, Derek Oldfield and; of course, Martin 
Best. 

In 1965 he became the official guitarist and lutist of 
England's Royal Shakespeare Company, and has 
become responsible for all the arranging, performing 
and composing of the music accompanying the 
Company's productions. He has also performed in 
solo recitals and on radio and television in Great 
Britain and the United States. 

The program is open to the public without charge. 




July 13, 1S72 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume I. Issue 5 



The Threshold Of A Relationship" 




Martin Best 




McGovernToCarry 
Democratic Banner 



Arts and Crafts Sale of White Roots of Peace in the Campus Center Music Listening Room. 



MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Wearied 
by marathon preliminaries, 
delegates to the Democratic 
National Convention nominated 
Senator George McGovern for 
President last night. McGovern's 
count went over the necessary 
majority of 1509 when the Illinois 
vote came in. At the Crier's press 
time, the roll call was expected to 
become unanimous. 

Shortly after McGovern's vic- 
tory. Rep. Shirley Chisholm of New 
York announced her withdrawal 
from the race 

Alter the raucous, record-long 
sessions it took to seat delegates 
and draft a platform, the con- 
vention's main event looked easy. 

McGovern had the votes. 

The Associated Press count of 
delegate commitments put the 
South Dakota senator well over the 
top at 1,613.75. with only 1,509 
needed for the first-ballot 
nomination Wallace had 383. 

The only suspense left was over 
McGovern's choice of a vice- 
presidential running mate. One 
name topped every list of 
prospects, that of Sen. Edward M. 
Kennedy of Massachusetts, who 
said he does not want to run for 



White Roots Explain Indian Culture 



By JIM GOLD 

"We realize that from the 
colleges and universities come 
Senators, Presidents, and even 
Gangsters -when they get into 
these positions, we hope they won't 
be so harsh," said Tom Porter, one 
of the six with the White Roots of 
Peace program members. 

In exclusive. Crier interview, 
Porter told of how this program 
started, what they hoped to ac- 
complish by it, and the trouble 
which his people have with the 
missionaries on their reservation. 

Explaining the workings of the 
program, Porter said that the six 
which came yesterday, alternate 
with others who remained on the 
reservation this time. He also said 
that they have been travelling 
around the country for nearly five 
years to non-Indians, but that 
"many years previous" they went 
to other reservations. Citing far- 
ming help needed in the summer, 
Porter said most of their tours are 
in fall and winter. 

He said many "young people 
look for something different, so 
they turn to the Indian." He said 
that these trips are not only 
educational for the white people 
who come to see them, but also the 
Indians are further educated about 
the whites' attitudes. 

About the arts and crafLs on sale 
yesterday in the Campu- Center 



Music Listening Room, Porter said 
that they are being sold as a favor 
to the Kosabonika, Cree, and 
Ogibwee nations. He further ex- 
plained that those people were 
dependent on wildlife and hunting 
for their food, but American and 

Canadianhuntershave"leftthefood 
supply scarce. They depend on 

these sales for their bread and 
butter." What little profit is left, he 
saia. is used tor gas to get from 
place to place. The honorarium for 
their appearance is turned over to 
the council leaders who take care 
of all families. 

Porter said that on the reser- 
vation is a trend "to reverse the 
process of assimilation." Because 
the majority of Indians have 
already become Christians, this is 
creating many conflicts. In the 
attempt "to revitalize the old In- 
dian ways," he explained, some 
mothers, who are Christians, have 
even gone as far as disowning their 
children who refuse to be 
Christian. 

He said that the local priest 
always goes along with plans 
which lead to assimilation and is 
always involved in political fights. 
"The priest condemns us as 
pagans," he said of those who 
believe in the old Indian religion. 
Those who go along with both 
Christian and Indian religions, 
however, are threatended with 



excommunication if they don't 
become completely Catholic, 
Porter explained. 

He disclaimed any bitterness 
except toward those "who come 
and try and change us and ridicule 
our religion." He further stated, 
there is no bitterness as long as 
they respect other religions. 

Highly critical of the Catholic 
missionaries. Porter denounced 
them by saying, "when you destroy 
people's hearts and spirit, you 
have killed them-they are walking 
dead." 

The Jew only take our money, he 
mentioned. 

He said there is no generation gap 
between the old and young of the 
"old believers", but that the 
Catholics have created a 
generation gap in those who are 
assimilated. 

Porter told of his people's 
prophecy for the world: All the 
powers of the armored world will 
soon crumble. He said that nature 



will turn them back. The armies of 
the world will not be powerful 
enough to stop it. He said that 
fighting and competition "are 
contrary to universal law." 

Talking of life on the reservation, 
Porter said that currently his 
people have man gardens to tend 
now, missionaries visit frequently, 
and that women pick the leaders of 
his nation. He also noted that many 
work on the newspaper of the In- 
dian nation --Awkesasne Notes. 
(Awkesasne means "land where 
the partridge drums," according to 
Porter. ) 

Porter told of an Indian woman's 
message to the world leaders. 
"When you have polluted the last 
ri"er, when you have caught the 
last fish, when you have cut down 
the last tree, only then will you 
realize you cannot eat the money in 
your banks." He expressed hope 
that these words would find the 
prooer lodging in the minds of 
those that hear them. 



Hamilton Appointed Chancellor 



Roy Hamilton, Vice-Chancellor of Financial Affairs at UMass-Boston, 
was appointed Tuesday as Acting-Chancellor of UMass-Boston at an 
executive session of the Board of Trustees. The position became vacant 
when Francis Broderick resigned several weeks ago. 



national office in 1972. 

The list that counted was 
McGovern's own, said to be four or 
five names long, for the senator 
from South Dakota will have his 
way when the convention makes 
the vice-presidential choice 
Thursday night. 

McGovern was closeted at his 
Doral Hotel penthouse, pondering 
his choiee and drafting an ac- 
ceptance speech to appeal for unity 
behind his ticket in a party that has 
been brawling for days. 

Six names were io be piaced 
before the national convention. The 
first was that of former Sen. 
Eugene J. McCarthy whose 
delegate commitment count is 
simple: zero. 

The others, in order: Wallace, 
former Gov. Terry Sanford of 
North Carolina. McGovern, Rep. 
Shirley Chisholm of New York, and 
Sen. Henry M. Jackson of 
Washington. 

Rep Wilbur D. Mills of Arkansas 
decided shortly before the session 
not to have his name entered. 

The order of nominating 
speeches was determined by lot. 

Two big names that aren't on the 
list: Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey of 
Minnesota and Sen. Edmund S. 
Muskie of Maine, who conceded the 
nomination to McGovern a day in 
advance. 

Secret Service and FBI agents 
seized two Negro men outside 
McGovern's hotel and took two 
pistols from their automobile. 

The men were charged with 
possession of concealed weapons 
and jailed in Miami. 

A band of demonstrators invaded 
the hotel lobby in an antiwar 
protest. About 70 of them sat on the 
floor of the plush resort hotel, 
occasionally chanting antiwar 
slogans and obscenities. 

About 200 paraded outside in 
protest against McGovern's 
statement that he would as 
president leave some forces in 
Southeast Asia until U.S. prisoners 
are released. 

Across Biscayne Bay at 
Wallace's Miami command post, 
his campaign manager said the 
chance the Alabama governor 
would run on a third-party ticket 
again in 1972 "seems to be getting 
stronger and stronger ever> 
minute." 

Charles S. Snider said Wallace 
will decide soon after the con 
vention whether to undertake 
another third-party campaign. The 
Alabama governor, addressing the 
convention from his wheelchai 
appealed in vain Tuesday night for 
a more conservative party stan. 
and a repudiation of the busing of 

(Continued on Page :'' 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



The Crier is a semi-weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in the Campus Center, 
Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for the contents. No 
copy is censored by the administration before Publication. Represented for 
national advertising by National Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



THURSDAY, JULY 13, i» 72 



Art Buchwald 



THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1972 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 

FINE ARTS 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

Elleni Koch 

Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



Reunion In Miami 



Cans For Coke 
Drive Planned 

( The following letter was received at The Crier's office.) 

The Coca-Cola Can Chain Letter 
Dear Friends: 

There is no doubt that there are too many cans being produced in 
America today. These cans, particularly soft drink cans, are produced 
for consumer convenience and with no regard for our earth. After the 
cans have been made utilizing stock or limited resources they are con- 
veniently disposed of in dumps and sanitary landfills or along the 
waysides. 

In the production process, large amounts of energy must be used 
(especially for the aluminum) and the end product is practically 
unrecyclable due to the combination of elements employed. For example, 
there are very few all-aluminum cans: most of the cans have easily 
pliable aluminum tops and bottoms, with steel bodies and lead soldered 
seams. It is too costly to separate the three metals so the cans are 
wastefully allowed to take up vast amounts of space in urban areas where 
solid waste disposal is most costly and consumption is greatest. 

Recently Coke (and some others) have begun printing "Please dispose 
of properly'* or "Please don I litter'' on the tops of their cans. As en- 
vironmentally aware citizens we know that the cans cannot be properly 
disposed of without adding to waste. We therefore have decided to protest 
against the Coke Company which more or less typifies the wastefullness 
of the convenience oriented, big business in America. We have decided to 
send the cans back to the corporate offices of Coke. 

Please help us! Send a can to the Corporate Offices of the Coca Cola 
Corp., P.O. Drawer 1734, Atlanta, Georgia 30301. Include a short, creative 
note (signed or unsigned as you will) explaining your actions and ex- 
pressing your beliefs. Because this is a chain letter, we ask that you send 
a copy of this note to at least two friends. If you will, show it to many 
more It will cost about 25« for postage ( 1st class ) , it should be wrapped in 
brown paper, and for only a little more for some extra copies and some 8* 
stamps. So keep the letter moving. With your help it is not inconceivable 
that Coke will receive upwards of 50,000 cans in the next few months. So 
act today and have all in your organizations take part. 

Due to the fact that we are less powerful and less wealthy than the Coke 
Corp., we must remain anonymous. 

Yours for a better environment via action 
"The Management" 
PS. Don't buy a can to send - you can find them everywhere. 



MIAMI BEACH, Fla. -A group of 
veterans had a reunion here in 
Miami this week to celebrate the 
fourth anniversary of the Chicago 
Democratic war of 1968. 

The veterans, many of whom 
brought families, were a little 
older, a lot balder and many had a 
paunch. They ate too much, drank 
too much and told war stories 
about the great battles they had 
fought in '68. 

"Those were the days," one 
veteran said wistfully as he sipped 
a bourbon in the Boom Boom Room 
of the Fontainebleau Hotel. "I'll 
never forget trying to get back to 
my room at the Conrad Hilton. I 
was hit by four cops, maced by a 
state trooper and run over by a 
National Guard jeep." 

Another veteran sitting next to 
him said, "Remember Harry, 
when we tried to raise the 
American Flag in Grant Park and 
a squad of mounted policemen 
trampled us to the ground with 
their horses?" 

"Do I remember?" Harry said. 
"You saved my life. Freddy. You 
threw yourself on a tear gas 
grenade." 

Another veteran said, "Did I 
ever tell you what happened to me 
on Michigan Avenue? I was 
walking along the sidewalk and 
two motorcycle cops came 
zooming down on me. 

"I jumped out of the way of one, 
got hit by the second, knocked into 7 
the street and then was thrown into 
a paddy wagon and charged with 
disturbing the peace." 

Harry said, "They don't have 

Campus Carousel 




Democratic conventions like that 
any more. The young kids just 
don't have the courage we did." 

A veteran named Charley 
agreed. 'All the kids want to do 
these days is nominate someone. 
They want the candidate handed to 
rhem on a silver platter. They don't 
Know you have to fight for what you 
get in politics." 

"You can say that again," 
Freddy said. "Where would Hubert 
Humphrey be today if we hadn't 
t ought for Chicago?" 

"Or Ed Muskie?" someone else 
added. 

"Chicago was the great one," 
Harry said. "It'll go down in 
history with Belleau Woods, and 



Midway and Iwo Jima. You know I 
try to tell my kids what it was like 
in Chicago in 1968, but they don't 
want to hear anything about it " 

"Neither do my kids," a veteran 
said. "To them it's history. But if 
we hadn't taken Chicago there 
wouldn't be a Democratic Party 
today. A party united, one for all 
and all for one. 

Another veteran said, "I'd like to 
go back to Chicago some day with 
my family and see it now. 

"I'd like to visit State Street and 
show them where we were cut off 
for three days by Mayor Daley's 
fire trucks." 

"I hear it's all built up and you 
can hardly see the war damage," 
Freddy said. 

"There was a girl in Chicago I 
gave a candy bar and a pack of 
cigarettes to. I wonder whatever 
happened to her," Harry said. 

A group of young people came 
into the Boom Boom Room handing 
out McGovern stickers. 

"Look at them." a veteran said 
scornfully. "When we were their 
age we were attacking the 
stockyards with stones and sticks, 
and throwing our bodies across the 
highway, all for the Democratic 
Party. And what are they doing? 
Handing out stickers in the Boom 
Boom Room. What's happened to 
the moral fiber of the Democratic 
Party?" 

"It's gone, said Freddy, "all 
gone. That's what happens when 
you make young kids delegates to a 
national convention." 

Copyright 1972, Los Angeles 
Times. 



Morale Women Open Sex 



Weepies 



By today, it should stop mothing 
outside, and the Patriots 
coming tomorrow. 

♦ * • 



are 



When are we going to have some 
more rain to end this three day 
drought. 



♦ * * 



Will the Campus Center Music There really should be a sign on 

Listening Room ever be useable top of the new library flashing 

again? Not until the rug stops time, temperature, and current 

smelling. chancellor. 



BY TONY GRANITE 
FACULTY MORALE IS 
DETERIORATING at Washington 
State's public universities, ac- 
cording to a recent report of the 
Council of Presidents there. 

The Campus Crier of Central 
Washington State says that the six 
afflicted campuses are concerned 
with "the intensification of faculty 
feeling on each campus aroused 
because Washington institutions 
have been rapidly falling behind in 
both salaries and fringe benefits." 
The prexies recommend to the 
regents and trustees "that priority 
attention be given to strenuous 
efforts to increase the rates of 
compensation of faculty and to 
improve the fringe benefit system 
available to them." 
* * * 

WOMEN'S LIBBERS at 

Mankato (Minn) State have 
sparked picketing of a campus 
fraternity, alleging that sexual 



assaults had been committed by 
members oi the fraternity upon an 
apparently retarded girl. 

According to coverage in the 
Daily Reporter, the local police say 
they have no evidence to document 
charges "against anyone." 

National headquarters of the 
fraternity says they found no 
evidence that the alleged rape had 
been committed. 

The Dean of Student Services 
said the girl had been located and 
hospitalized. 

As for taking further action, the 
SS Dean told the Reporter: "If 
someone would say these people 
are involved in this type of in- 
cident', the institution would do 
something." 



* * * 



FREE. WILLING AND OPEN 

SEX and marijuana smoking in the 
dormitories of the University of 
South Florida" has been charged 
by a reporter of the St. Petersburg 



Times, according to a page one 
piece in the student newspaper, 
The Oracle. 

The reporter spent two days on 
the USoFla campus, posing as a 
visiting student. He reported 
seeing "marijuana smoked as 
frequently as tobacco and liquor 
stashed in drawers, shoeboxes and 
suitcases." He also reported that 
there is "no doubt that many boys 
and girls sleep (?) together in 
dorms despite rules that sup- 
posedly prohibit it." 

The story also reminded that a 
former Board of Regents member, 
a St. Petersburg attorney, had 
charged last Fall that the USoFla 
dormitories were "taxpayers' 
whorehouses." 

The reported replied: "Whether 
the dormitories qualify as 
whorehouses is doubtful, because 
little, if any of the sex is for hire. 
Almost all of it is free, willing and 
open." 



Toward Student/Faculty Partnership In Governance 



(This is Part II of a position paper by the 
Student Government Association) 

The 1970 AAUP Statement on Student 
Participation is somewhat more enlightened 
than the 1966 Statement. But, while ad- 
vocating "joint effort'' and "shared 
authority" on the one hand, it fails to put the 
concept into practice. Instead, it merely 
advocates that students should be "con- 
sulted," "heard," or "have the opportunity 
to assess the value" of academic policies 
and programs. The statement blindly 
assumes that the real decision-making still 
rests with the faculty, while a token effort is 
made to patronize students. 

During the r960s, the decade of the 
iniversity's most accelerated growth, 
undergraduate education took a back seat to 
the effort of acquiring a prestigious faculty, 
encouraging research, and building the 
graduate program. As the Future 
University Report points out, the second 
phase of our growth requires a renewed 
commitment to the education of un- 
dergraduates. 

On the Amherst campus, the ad- 
ministration and some of the faculty now 
acknowledge that students should be equal 
partners in academic decision-making. But 



rhetoric does not match reality. While the 
administration is moving in the direction of 
acknowledging such a partnership, the 
Faculty Senate continues to function as if 
students did not exist. Much of the faculty 
has forgotten its primary role is not self- 
protection or self-advancement, but rather 
partnership with students in the adventure 
of learning. 

We believe quite strongly that the time 
has come for the Trustees to acknowledge 
the mutual responsibility of students and 
faculty alike to collectively formulate the 
educational policies of the institution. 

The faculty will not unilaterally surrender 
its total power over academic issues. 
Students can humbly petition them to do so, 
but it is not in the faculty's self-interest to 
voluntarily give up its power. They refuse to 
see that the institution does not belong to 
them alone. 

History demonstrates that institutional 
power is rarely shared voluntarily. That 
lesson has been re-affirmed most recently in 
the movements for racial justice. Such 
power is shared only after massive protest 
or pressure from the top down. We believe 
that faculty power over academic policy will 
never be shared unless one of these two 



methods are used. We hope that the 
Trustees will be able to exert the "pressure 
from the top down." 

WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT 
THE TRUSTEES ISSUE A POLICY 
STATEMENT THAT DIRECTS THE 
AMHERST CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION 
TO CONSULT WITH BOTH THE FACULTY 
AND STUDENT SENATES PRIOR TO 
IMPLEMENTATION OF ACADEMIC 
POLICIES. The two Senates are now 
working on a conference committee system 
that would make such a bi-cameral process 
function more smoothly. 

But the student-faculty partnership in 
governance must not only be campus-wide 
it must extend to the college and depart- 
mental level as well. WE STRONGLY 
RECOMMEND THAT THE TRUSTEES 
ESTABLISH AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION 
PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS 

ESTABLISHING MINIMUM 
REQUIREMENTS OF VOTING STUDENT 
PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATIONAL 
POLICY DECISIONS AT ALL LEVELS 
Such requirements should include: 

(a) Co-equal decision-makinc on 
matters of campus governance, academic 
budgeting & resource allocation, ad- 



missions, development of new programs 
(esp. residence-based academic programs), 
course load and degree requirements, 
curriculum development and review, 
teacher evaluation and grading (student 
evaluation), and other decisions relating to 
the academic environment. 

<b) Significant voting representation in 
faculty personnel decisions at all levels. 

Even the organization of the Board of 
Trustees perpetuates the myth of exclusive 
faculty control of educational policy. The 
Committee on Faculty & Educational Policy 
deals with academic issues, while the 
Committee on Student Activities does not 
deal directly with such issues. WE 
STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT THE 
BOARD MERGE THE STUDENT AC- 
TIVITIES COMMITTEE WITH THE 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
COMMITTEE, ESTABLISHING A NEW 
COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL 
POLICY. The Educational Policy Com- 
mittee would have two sub-committees, one 
on Student Affaire and one on Faculty Af- 
fairs, for those rare issues that are the 
exclusive concern of one constituency. 

-Adopted by the Student Senate 
Executive Committee, June 26, 1972 



L.B.J. May Be 
Called as Witness 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Three 



l.os ANGELES - A defense 
attorney in the Pentagon Papers 
trial said Wednesday that the 
defense is considering calling 
former President Lyndon B. 
Johnson as a witness. 

Attorney Leonard Weinglass told 
a reporter that Johnson is "under 
consideration" for a subpoena to 
testify about his use of secret 
documents in his autobiolgraphical 
book, "Vantage Point." 

Weinglass' comments came as 
the trial of Daniel Ellsberg and 
Anthony Russo entered its third 
day of jury selection with the judge 
quizzing potential jurors on their 
views on the Vietnam war and 
other issues. 

Should Johnson be called to 



testify, it would be after the 
government presents its case. 
Weinglass said the former 
president is among "30 or 40 wit- 
nesses" on a list being considered 
by the defense. 

He said that Johnson's testimony 
could prove that the segments of 
Pentagon Papers were already in 
manuscript form in Johnson's book 
at the time Ellsberg and Russo 
were accused of stealing them. He 
said that if the defense can prove 
the papers were already public 
knowledge, it would aid in proving 
that the defendants did not commit 
espionage, conspiracy or theft 
because their classification as top 
secret would have been broken. 



Kissing Bandit Seized 



A 26-year-old Queens man, 
believed to have stolen hundreds of 
kisses from women riding the 
Flushing IRT line, has been 
charged with assault and 
harassment. 

The suspect, Irving Steiman, of 
39-27 45th Street. Woodside, was 
arrested shortly before b:30 P.M. 
Thursday by two transit patrolmen 
at the Willis Avenue Station of the 
line after a female passenger 
whose identity was withheld 
complained the man had bitten her 
lip while her eyes were closed. The 



woman thought she might have 
been dreaming, "until her lip was 
bitten," the police said. 

The police said that at least 10 
women had filed compliants about 
the "kissing bandit." They said he 
was believed to have kissed 
"hundreds of women" in the last 
eight months. Only recently, the 
police said, "has he begun to bite." 
Mr. Steiman waas held in $5,000 
bail and was sent to a municipal 
hospital for observation. 

Reprinted from the N.Y. Times 

7/9/72 



McGovern Nominee 



(Continued from Page i; 

school children for purposes of 
racial balance. 

After the record-long session, the 
convention approved a platform 
tailored to the liberal posture of 

McGovern, advocating prompt and 
total withdrawal of U.S. iorces in 
Indochina. 

After a night of debate and hours 
of voting had worked only two 
minor changes in the platform, the 
convention adopted it and recessed 
in exhaustion at 6:22 a.m. It was 
the longest session in convention 
history and it left the delegates a 
scant 12 hours before the gavel fell 
again. 

But with his platform views 
spurned and McGovern in firm 
control, the third-party talk was 
not long in coming. 



McGovern conferred with six 
Democratic governors, and one of 
them said that Kennedy and Mills 
had been suggested as "great 
additions to the ticket" in the vice- 
presidential spot. 

McGovern was sure to be on the 
telephone to Kennedy, in Hyannis 
Port. Mass., soon after the 
nominating roll call. Kennedy has 
remained away from the con- 
vention but indicated he might 
come down before the sessions end 
to help bolster party unity. 

Other names on his list of vice- 
presidential prospects were said to 
include Leonard Woodcock, 
president of the United Auto 
Workers, Sens. Walter F. Mondale 
of Minnesota, Thomas F. Eagleton 
of Missouri and Abraham A. 
Ribicoff of Connecticut, and Gov. 
Reubin Askew of Florida. 



WMUA Boosts Wattage 



At long last, WMUA is 1,000 
watts, and its signal carries up and 
down the Pioneer Valley, from 
Vermont to Hartford, all summer 
long. 

Running the station over the 
summer is a small "core of year- 
round people who are doing 
their best to give WMUA a 
continuity and an identifiable 
image that may have been lacking 
in the past," according to a station 
spokesman. The sounds are what 
could best be called progressive 
rock. But like all labels, however, 
that one is misleading. The music 
tries to reflect what is good in 
music today. That includes jazz, 
classics, folk and oldies," he said. 

"As for public affairs 
programming, the long-running 



'Focus' series with Ken 
Mosakowski is now on twice 
weekly, on Tuesday and Thursday 
nights at 10 P.M. 

'Sportsline', features interviews 
with many of the sports per- 
sonalities from - UMass and 
elsewhere who will be in the area 
this summer." 

Host, Marty Kelley, Sports 
Director for the past academic 
year, will air all gripes and ob- 
servations from the world of sports 
as well as present interesting and 
informative guests to make the 
evening's hour a most interesting 
one for you. Sportsline is on Sun- 
days at 10 P.M. live over WMUA, 
91.1 fm, 545-2876. 

WMUA is on from 8 A.M. until 2 
A.M., 7 days a week, at 91.1 fm. 



Fisher Looses First Match 



REYKJAVIK, Iceland - With 
a hopeless position on the chess 
board, Bobby Fischer walked out 
for 30 minutes Wednesday, then 
returned to lose the first game of 
the world chess championship to 
Boris Spassky, the Russian 
titleholder. 

After the game was over Fischer 
told the man who taught him the 
moves of the game when he was a 
boy in Brooklyn, NY., that "it will 
settle down." 

It was a bad day all around for 
the 29-year-old American. In ad- 
dition to conceding Spassky a 1-0 
lead at the outset of the 24-game 
match, Fischer developed some 



more money trouble. 

He shook hands with Spassky 
and, before he left, turned and 
waved to the crowd. The spectators 
applauded Spassky. 

News from London was that 
James Slater, who sweetened the 
pot with 50,000 pounds-about 
$120,000 wouldn't be able to get his 
money out of England because of 
currency restrictions. 

Slater's donation, which pushed 
the total prize money to $300,000, 
enticed Fischer to end his holdout 
at the scheduled start of the match 
July 2. 

Asked about Slater's problem, 
Fischer snapped, "No comment". 



Nixon-Dobrynin Confer 



SAN CLEMENTE. Calif. On the 
eve of resumption of the Paris 
peace talks, President Nixon 
conferred Wednesday with a 
ranking Soviet diplomat as the 
White House reiterated that U.S. 
proposals to end the Vietnam war 
were flexible. 

Timing of Soviet Ambassador 
Anatoly Dobrynin's visit to the 
Western White House was purely 
coincidental, said press secretary 
Ronald L. Ziegler, and does not 
relate to the renewed Paris talks. 

Ziegler said, however, that 
Vietnam would come up "in the 
course of over-all discussion on 
world affairs" between Nixon and 
the diplomat who has served in the 
past as a go-between in U.S. 
contacts with Soviet leaders. 

The presidential spokesman, 
responding to questions as the 
Nixon-Dobrynin meeting began, 
said "there is no foundation" to a 
news report from Peking that the 
United States was ready to make 
substantial concessions to the 
Communists in the Vietnam 
negotiations. 

Ziegler described the Peking 
dispatch as "purely speculative" 
and said he would have no "sub- 
stantial comment on it". 

RVNto 



the Rear 



SAIGON - Enemy forces struck 
Wednesday at the vital southwest 
flank of South Vietnamese troops 
battling around the provincial 
capital of Quang Tri, forcing a 
retreat. 

North Vietnamese forces 
remained entrenched in the city 
despite heavy bombing and 
shelling as the 20,000-man South 
Vietnamese drive into Quang Tri 
Province entered its third week. 

Associated Press correspondent 
Dennis Neeld reported from the 
northern front that several hun- 
dred North Vietnamese troops 
backed by tanks attacked 
government paratroopers on the 
southwestern flank and drove them 
off their hilltop positions. 

The southwestern flank of the 
operation is considered vital 
uecause allied officers have been 
concerned since the beginning of 
the drive that the North Viet- 
namese might attempt to circle 
around behind the task force and 
attack Hue, 32 miles to the 
southeast. 

The strategic outpost on a 1,000- 
foot promontory overlooking the 
main western approach to Hue has 
changed hands four times in the 
past two weeks. 



But the spokesman used the 
occasion to repeat that the United 
States seeks "constructive and 
serious talks" with the Com- 
munists and will "listen to the 
other side." 

"We have said there is flexibility 
in our proposals," Ziegler added. 
"We do not have a closed mind." 



Dobrynin's meeting with Nixon 
was arranged by the President's 
chief foreign affairs adviser, 
Henry Kissinger, who gave the 
diplomat and his wife a guided tour 
of Hollywood movie and television 
studios and was host at a dinner for 
them Tuesday night at a French 
restaurant. 



Third Party Movement 

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. George C. Wallace, defeated in his attempt to 
write an antibusing plank into the Democratic party platform, hinted 
strongly Wednesday at another third-party race for president. 

The campaign director, Charles S. Snider, .told newsmen the possibility 
of a third-party campaign "seems to be getting stronger and stronger 
every minute" because of the Democratic National Convention's refusal 
to accept the Alabama governor's platform recommendations. 

Snider said Wallace refused to withdraw as a candidate for the 
Democratic nomination because his delegates traveled to the convention 
to vote for him and he would not deny them that chance. 

Parking Fee 
Increase Opposed 



Members of two labor unions, the 
U.M.E.A. chapter of the M.S.E.A. 
and the A.F.S.C. & ME. local #1776 
at the University of Massachusetts 
in Amherst have once again 
decided to wage a vigorous 
campaign in opposition to the large 
increase in Registration Fee, 
which they feel unjustified, being 
charged to register motor vehicles 
at the Amherst campus. 

One year ago the University 
Administration under Chancellor 
Tippo attempted to raise the 
Parking Fees without consultation 
or agreement with the labor 
organizations, this was vigorously 
opposed. This year they are faced 
with a similar proposal under a 
different guise, now called a 
Registration Fee, which the Ad- 
ministration has increased - 
against objections of both labor 
unions -from $1 to $5. 

The U.M.E.A. has repeatedly 
voiced objections to any increase 
in parking fees, whether called 
Parking or Registration. The 
U.M.E.A. continues to oppose this 
action of the Administration 
because they consider parking to 



be a condition of employment 
which the University must provide 
without charge to workers. As 
taxpayers, the employees feel such 
charges are a double assessment. 
The U.M.E.A. further claims that 
the chaotic parking situation is the 
result of "lack of foresight" in 
planning and budgeting by the 
University during years of high 
growth. They claim the Ad- 
ministration of the University is 
now trying to make the employees 
pay for this poor planning-because 
at no other state institution in 
Massachusetts are fees levied on 
workers to park their vehicles. 

In a recent letter to Chancellor 
Bromery, the President of the 
U.M.E.A. Bernard Turner, made it 
very clear that they are opposed to 
the Administration action, and 
called for action on the part of 
Bromery to immediately suspend 
the Registration Fee of $5 and 
negotiate the matter with 
U.M.E.A. officials. 

At a meeting of U.M.E.A. and 
M.S.E.A. officials on July 5, it was 
decided that more vigorous action 
will be taken. 



Nixon Asks Relief 

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. — President Nixon announced today he will 
ask Congress to vote $1.7 billion in disaster relief funds and authorize one 
per cent interest loans for homeowners and businessmen in Eastern 
states recovering from Tropical Storm Agnes flood damag? 

The special request for $1.7 billion if approved by Congress, would be 
the "largest single amount ever alloct ted for a recovery effort," Nixon 
said, and would be used for every aspect of long-and short-term 
assistance. 



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JESSICA TANDY 



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starring Joan Crawford 
JULY 18, 1972 B «*te Davis 

Campus Center Auditorium 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 



Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1972 



Mahavishnu: Warm Night, Hot Music 



By KLLENI KOCH 

Warm-up groups usually have the un- 
comfortable position of playing before a 
restive or disinterested audience, but the 
three women composing the recently 
organized DEADLY NIGHTSHADE 
combined instrumental expertise with 
pleasing voices, gaining the listener's at- 
tention. The result was refreshing, 
reminiscent of the style of Ian and Sylvia. 
The violinist. Helen Hooke, was outstanding 
as she soloed, or harmonized with the bass 
of Pamela Brandt and the rhythm guitar of 
Anne Bowen. Several songs on their 



program were particularly well done, 
especially their second piece, entitled 
"Woman". Keep an eye on this talented, 
local, rhythm 'n' blues/folk/rock group. 

Following THE DEADLY NIGHTSHADE, 
the Mahavishnu Orchestra came on last 
Monday at about 8 o'clock, in the Student 
Union Ballroom instead of Metawampe 
Lawn, due to the ominous clouds that have > 
been blanketing Amherst skies lately. The* 
five Mahavishnu players erupted im- 
mediately with complex rhythms and 
progressions building up a modern ar- 
chitecture of sound on the firm foundation of 



Billy Cobham's exceptional drumming. He 
kept the pace going at the seemingly in- 
credible rate of one thousand times normal 
heartbeat. Listening to them was 
exhausting and exhilirating at the same 
time; it was great. However, they certainly 
amplified their intense energy needlessly to 
an extreme, for their good style and the size 
of the room did not warrant the camouflage 
of extra decibels that mediocre hard rock 
bands extensively use. 

Jerry Goodman's electric violin was very 
effective during a solo performance backed 
gently by the drummer and the eloquent 



double guitar of John McLaughlin 
organizer of the group. McLaughlin played a 
normal guitar, also, but I couldn't help 
getting the feeling that the double guitar 
was only a gimmick, for it was a rare 
moment when he utilized the upper, twelve- 
string portion. 

Despite the intense heat in the tightly 
packed SUB, the audience devoured every 
sound during the lengthy concert. Too many 
times listeners are left half-satisfied with a 
twenty-minute stint, but I'm sure that most 
felt quite satiated by the uncommon talents 
of THE MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA. 




(Left) Tom McLaughlin works his guitar Monday night 
in the ballroom. (Middle left) Billy Cobham on the drums. 
(Lower left) Helen Hooke plays electric violin. (Bottom) 
The deadly nightshades perform. (Photos by Carl Nash 
and Steve Schmidt) 







THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1972 

Review 



"Private Lives" 



By JIM GOLD 

Sharp wit and flippancy appears 
to be Noel Coward's formula for 
getting through a successful 
romance in "Private Lives" now 
playing at Mt. Holyoke Summer 
Theater until Saturday. 

The play opens with Elyot ana 
Sybil Chase honeymooning in a 
French hotel. In the next room are 
Victor and Amanda Prynne, also 
honey mooners. The conflicts start 
sparking when Elyot and Amanda 
find each other. They had been 
divorced five years earlier. Love 
reinfects them immediately : "Kiss 
me before your body rots and 
worms pop in and out of your 
eyes." 

Jim Cavanaugh did a fine job as 
Elyot, although during the first 
scene his movements seemed 
somewhat mechanical. However, 
as the play progressed, he relaxed 
and became Elyot, not Cavanaugh. 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Five 

Studio Opera at 
So. Mountain 



No one could complain about the' 
performance of Fontaine Syr 
(Amanda). She came off as the 
perfect self-assured, liberated 
woman. What she wanted, she 
went after, but her mind changed 
too rapidly to maintain pace with 
her whims. Amanda, constantly 
engaging in verbal fencing with 
whomever she spoke, delighted the 
audience. 



Victor, played by Bruce Starin, 
portrayed the well-bred English 
gentleman well, relying on proper 
etiquette to guide his life. Victor 
relied on others around him for 
support, but was always com- 
promising as each situation 
warranted. He tried greatly to 
please Amanda, but found soon 
that normal pleasures were not 
hers. 



Taubey D. Shedden played the 
young Sibyl, a sweet but 
unassuming little kvetch. Shedden 
stumbled on her lines several 
times but because of the character 
she played it was almost ap- 
propriate. 



Susan Buckley was a pleasant 
surprise as the French maid who 
was completely understood by all 
the audience, even though she 
spoke only French. She always 
swept into the room with the force 
of a tornado, screaming "oof, oh" 



Amanda threw in some good 
words for women's lib. During one 
argument with her first husband, 
he said women should not be 
promiscuous. She quickly retorted, 
"It does not suit men for women to 
be promiscuous." 



PITTSFIELD — "Vienna to 
Broadway," a program of portions 
of operas of Franz Lehar, through 
Paris and London, to Broadway 
musicals, by a quartet of singers 
from Lincoln Center's 

Metropolitan Opera Studio will 
open the South Mountain concert 
hall on Routes 7 and 20 a mile south 
of Pittsfield. 



assistant manager, John Gutman, 
the studio singers appeared in 
Pittsfield in 1962 in "Cosi Fan 
Tutti" shortly after they had sung 
at the White House for President 
and Mrs. John F. Kennedy, and 
returned, by request, to South 
Mountain in 1965 and 1968 to sing 
"Don Pasquali" and "The Barber 
of Seville". 



In costume, with properties and 
scenery that characterize the 
studio's performances, the cast of 
four young but experienced artists, 
with piano accompaniment, will 
sing excerpts from six Viennese 
operas, including "The Merry 
Widow" and "Countess Maritza," 
from "Irma la Douce" and from 
"The Mikado," "Brigadoon" and 
"My Fair Lady". 

Organized in 1960 bv the 
Metropolitan Opera Company's 



The other concerts of the current 
South Mountain season will be on 
Aug. 12, a piano recital by Stanley 
Hummel: Aug. 26, the Orpheus 
Trio: Sept. 17, the Rochester 
Chamber Soloists with Eugene 
List, pianist, and Carroll Glenn, 
violinist: Oct. 1, the Beaux Arts 
Trio of New York. 



Program and ticket information 
are available by mail to South 
Mountain Concerts, Box 23, Pitt- 
sfield. 



Double Fright Tuesday Night | This is Burlesque 



On Tuesday, July 18 at 7:00 p.m., 
the Summer Program will present 
two . 1ms in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. The first will be 
Alfred Hitchcock's classic "THE 
BIRDS ", starring Rod Taylor and 
Suzanne Pleschette. The film 
makes you witness to a rare kind of 
horror as hundreds of people are 
victims of a mysterious attack by 
fierce birds. Hitchcock does an 



tension builds to a shocking Hit- 
chcock like conclusion. Jane' was 
nominated for five Academy 
Awards and won one. This 132- 
minute flick was a top grossing box 
office picture of the year. 

Both films together promise a 
horrifyingly entertaining evening. 
They are shown at no charge but 
UMass summer students with IDs 
will be admitted first. 



excellent job of conveying sheer 
terror to the viewer. 

Following a short intermission. 
•WHATEVER HAPPENED TO 
BABY JANE?" will begin at 9 p.m. 
Betty Davis and Joan Crawford 
team up in a story of a has-been 
child star Baby Jane Hudson' 
whose cuteness has grown 
grotesque in her later years. The 
film is filled with taut drama as 



"Cop a Plea" or "Cop a Cure" 



A panel of attorneys and a judge 
recently convened by the journal 
Contemporary Drug Problems 

suggested that the lawyer's role in 
narcotics cases may rapidly be 

shitting from defender of a client to 
advocate oj treatment for the 
addict. 

Noting tlud tl- has 

ahv. 

f in 

. 

effectively be helped through 

socking treatment for his drug 

habit. He declared that to act as 



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an attorney and close your eyes to 
the man's main problem-which is 
drug addiction and not that he has 
a case pending against him-is very 
limiting " 

Another eminent panelist. Judge 
Harold Rothwax. of the Criminal 
Court of the City ot New York, not 
only concurred with Attorni 
but impugned what he calh 
irrel< 

* 1cm 

addiel To quoti 

Rothwax if w< ' an ad 

and we know at the outset that we 
want to place him on probation or 
get him into a drug program, let's 
do it at once and not wait until 
we've gone through 4 or S pretrial 
proceedings and trial proceedings 
and then, only then, put him in that 
program " 

The panel's moderator. Attorney 
Laurence London, questioned 
whether, in narcotics cases, justice 
should be equated with medical or 
psychiatric help. As he put it, 
should the defense attorney "cop a 
program" rather than a plea? 

Most certainly, replied .Judge 
Rothwax. who explained his 
position: "The fellow comes into 
the system and is offered the op- 
portunity either to have the case 
prosecuted or to try. on a tern 
porary basis, to work out a 
program If he works successfully 
in the program, the prosecutor 
says Well, there is no point in 
prosecuting him now we'll let him 
go Bui if the fellow says. I insist 



on my innocence. I'm not going to 
be bothered with this program.' 
there is a due process right to be 
prosecuted and to serve the 
maximum amount of time 
provided by law " 

But another panelist Attorney 

Richard Kuh. disagreed He said 

. vary in ef- 

■ 

■ml into 

ild simply 

v with a 

ilc helping the 

prosecution court to lighten 

its heavy volume of drug cases 

But Attorney Mass insisted that 
although not all drug programs 
have proved effective, he con- 
cluded that "they're better than 
going to jail for six months and 
coming out and being an addict all 
over again.'' According to Mass, a 
good defense lawyer should ex- 
plain to his clients what the dif- 
ferent programs are and try to 
discover which type of program 
will most interest the defendant. 
Other panelists agreed that not 
only lawyers, but judges and 
prosecutors, too. should have some 
knowledge as to the nature of each 
program and its availability 



WEST SPRINGFIELD.- Mass.Ti 
Ann Corio. the gracious lady of the 
golden era of burlesque, will star in 
her own show, "This Was 
Burlesque" opening at Storrowton 
Theatre on July 17, for one week 
only. 

"This Was Burlesque," brings 
back the illusion of the burlesque 
era, with its veteran comics, 
strippers, tassle-twirlers and 
chorines, who all perform sketches 
and routines which were 
characterized by that period in 
theatrical history. 

Now starring with Ann Corio in 
"This Was Burlesque", Frank 
Fontaine is "now in his element", 



according to reviewer George 
Gardner in South Bend, Indiana, 
where the show opened with 
Fontaine. He closed his review by 
saying that with Ann Corio and 
Frank Fontaine, "This Was 
Burlesque" is burlesque as alive 
and well as it's ever been. 

Tickets for "This Was 
Burlesque" and all the Storrowton 
Theatre productions are available 
at the Storrowton box office 
located at the site of the orange and 
green tent on the Exposition 
grounds or by calling 732-1101 in 
the Greater Springfield area or 522- 
5211 in the Greater Hartford area. 



The place that made Amherst 
famous. 

DRAKE RESTAURANT 

Village Inn 

RATHSKELLER 

85 AMITY 253-2548 

Open 11 a.m. — 2 a.m. 




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THE ART OF THE MINSTREL 

Songs with Lute and Guitar 

Lower Gardens (near Infirmary) 

(Memorial Hall if rain.) 

Free 
TONIGHT at 8 Admission 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1972 



tuiibSDAY, JULY 13, W2 



Medical Center Offers 
Parenthood Guide Book 



Research Center Dedicated 



To bridge this gap and to present 
the latest medical knowledge on 
pregnancy, birth and the newborn, 
the Children's Hospital Medical 
Center in Boston has written a 
complete guide to parenthood as 
part of its continuing education 
program for parents. 

The book draws on the expertise 
of obstetricians, pediatricians, 
psychiatrists, social workers, 
anthropologists and psychologists 
in order to present the process of 
childbearing in its broadest per- 
spective. The authors, each of 
whom is an authority on one or 
more aspects of pregnancy and 
birth, bring the growing body of 
scientific knowledge to bear on the 
physiological, emotional and social 
factors involved in becoming a 
parent. The authors deal not only 
with the medical facts, but present 
these facts in a context and in 
language the new mother can 
understand. 

To present as complete a picture 
as possible, the guide is divided 
into three complete sections: the 
first on the diagnosis and course of 
a healthy pregnancy and all 
possible complications; the second 
on childbirth itself, including 
natural childbirth ; the third on the 
newborn infant, including all 
aspects of his behavior, his health, 
his care and feeding in the early 
months. Such important decisions 



as breast versus bottle feeding or 
the choice of a pediatrician are 
carefully discussed. The parent 
concerned about hereditary 
disorders will find a simple, clear 
explanation of genetics. 

' All in all, the book, Pregnancy, 
Birth and the Newborn Baby, 

brings medical knowledge and 
parents' questions together in a 
new way, according to Leonard W. 
Cronkhite, M.D., Director of the 
CHMC. "Over a period of six years 
this book came into being so that it 
would offer parents up-to-date 
medical and psychological facts 
about pregnancy, reproduction and 
the newborn. The book conceived 
and carried out by our Health 
Education department, draws 
upon the research and clinical 
experience of some of the best 
people on our staff and elsewhere. 
We hope that it will be a handbook 
no prospective parent will want to 
do without regardless of socio 
economic background, age or 
education. The authors have ad- 
dressed themselves to both the 
external and everyday questions. 
They have dealt with negative 
feelings as well as positive, the 
likely occurence and the unlikely. 
v We are pleased to be able to stand 
behind the book's publication as a 
service to parents and doctors 
everywhere." 




Be A MLLE Campus Marketing Rep 

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A new teaching and research 
laboratory at the University of 
Massachusetts Horticultural 
Research Center in Belchertown 
was dedicated in a joint ceremony 
by the University and the 
Massachusetts Fruit Growers 
Association yesterday. 

The $381,000 structure was 
named in honor of the late John 
Chandler of Sterling Junction, an 
outstanding fruit grower, a former 
state Commissioner of 

Agriculture, and a former UMass 
trustee. He is the father of Nathan 
Chandler, the present Com- 
missioner of Agriculture. 

The ceremony will be held in 
conjunction with the annual 
summer meeting of the fruit 
growers association. The 
Belchertown research center, a 
215-acre orchard and farm, was 
purchased by the association and 
presented to the University in 1962. 

When the expansion of the 
UMass Amherst campus in the 
early 1960's began cutting into the 
research orchard land on campus, 
the association led a drive that 
raised $40,000 in contributions from 
200 individuals and organizations, 
purchased a farm in Belchertown 
and turned it over to the Univer- 
sity, to be used for research and 
teaching by the department of 
plant and soil sciences. 

To be dedicated Wednesday is an 
11,000 square foot building with 
five CA (controlled atmosphere) 

Deerfield 
Lecture 

Continues 

Historic Deerfield, Inc., of 
Deerfield. will continue its Historic 
Lecture series next week. 

On Tuesday, Jane C. Giffen, 
Curator of Ceramics and Textiles 
at Old Sturbridge Village, will 
speak on "Glimpses of the Early 
New England Interior, 1760-1850". 
The final event of the series, on 
Friday, August 4, will be a lecture 
on "The Garrison House Myth: 
Frontier Building in New 
England" by Dr. Abbott Lowell 
Cummings, Director of the Society 
for the Preservation of New 
England Antiquities in Boston. 
Both these lectures will be held in 
the White Church (Community 
Center) at 8:00 p.m. 

The Historic Deerfield Lecture 
and Film Series is open to the 
public. Admission is free and all 
are welcome. 



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storage rooms, a general purpose 
chemical research laboratory, a 
leaching lab and an open area for 
pilot-scale handling, grading and 
packing equipment for fruit. A 
federal grant of $27,637 helped 
build the lab. 

CA is a method of controlling 
temperature and atmosphere for 
the storage of apples that keeps the 
fruit fresh about four months 
longer than was possible 15 years 
ago. Research at UMass was a 
prime factor in the development of 
CA storage by Massachusetts 
growers, and the state CA storage 
crop today is valued at about $3 
million annually. 

At the dedication Wednesday, 
tours and exhibits for officials and 
invited guests begin at 10 a.m. 
The ceremony itself 12 

noon, a luncheon follow, and 



inspection of the new building 
begin at 2 p.m. 



John Chandler, born in Brookline 
in 1890 and graduated from Yale 
University in 1913, was an apple 
grower for 38 years. Besides his 
service as Commissioner of 
Agriculture and on the UMass 
Board of Trustees, he was at 
various times president of the 
National Apple Institute, of the 
Massachusetts Farm Bureau, of 
the Massachusetts Fruit Growers 
Association and of the Boston 
Regional Produce Market. He was 
also executive vice-president of the 
New York and New England Apple 
Institute for 11 years, a vice- 
president and trustee of the Clinton 
Savings Bank, and a School 
Committee and Finance Com- 
mittee member for the town of 
Sterling. He died in 1965. 



'Emperor's New Clothes' 
To Open At Williston 



"The Emperor's New Clothes," a play based on the comic fairy tale for 
children, will be performed beginning Saturday, July 15 at the Williston 
Summer Theatre, Easthampton. 

Its 22-year-old director and veteran of children's theatre, Miss Jann 
Gingold, describes the production of "The Emperor's New Clothes" as 
having "everything for children - a royal lady to be rescued, a wicked 
villain, and even a set of heroes something like the Marx Brothers." 
Sixteen players will perform in the production, with performances to be 
offered at 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 7 p.m. on dates through August 5 in the 
Williston-Northampton Theatre School building. 

Miss Gingold, a University of Connecticut theatre major graduate, 
describes the version of the fairy tale as "very Chinese. There are 
elaborate Chinese costumes and oriental make-up. The sets, designed by 
a New York professional, show the emperor's palace and his grand city, 
complete with three-story pagodas. There are hidden treasures and 
secret doors." During the intermission, Chinese refreshments will be 
served. 

The children in the audience will have an active part in the production; 
some will sit on the stage. "The children are let in on the scheming of the 
two adventurers in the story, who clumsily plot to trick a villain and help 
the royal weavers by inventing invisible clothes for the emperor. There is 
lots of action in the aisles, and the cast will play theater games and sing 
with the children at intermission," Miss Gingold says. 

The production aims at entertaining children from four years old to 
secondary school age. The Williston Summer Theatre will also offer 
productions of "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," opening Wednesday, 
July 19, and Ionesco's "Rhinoceros," opening Wednesday, July 26. 

Ticket information can be obtained by calling the Williston Summer 
Theater box office at 527-1520. extension 44. 



r 



CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED 



Please Insert one character, space, or punctuation mark per box. 



FOR SALE 



Nikon F Hard Leather case. 
Like New S15. Call Gib at 549- 
6087. 

7/21 

1964 Chevrolet Impala Con- 
vertible, good condition, contact 
Larry at 549-6676 or leave 
message at Crier office. 



FOR RENT 



Tickets to Rolling Stones 
Concert Wed. July 19 at Boston 
Garden. Call 413-774-4267 ?ter 
5:00 p.m. 

7/13 



22" Black & White TV $45., 21" 
Color TV $150. TELEVISION 
C ENTER, 55 North Pleasant St 
Amherst, 2nd Floor, 0253-5100. 

8/15 

Torino, (Ford) '68, GT, spt. 
roof. V8, 3 spd stand., new 
exhaust, brakes, valve job, snow 
tires w/wheels, excel, cond., 
orig. owner, $1375. Call 549 0525 
(after 6 p.m.) 

7/18 



Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $ 185/ AA incl utilities. Call 
Resident Mgr 665-4239, if no 
answer 1-7860500. 

8/15 

NOTICES 

Christians — prayer meeting 
AAon — Fri., 12: 30 — 1 : 00 p.m. 
177 CC. Everyone welcome. 

7/20 



GAY FRIENDS: Tanglewood 
picnic Saturday. Much more 
planned for future. Call 5-0154 
for further info. 

7/13 



1969 Ford Fairlane, 2-dr. hard- 
top, v 8 automatic, power 
steering, low mileage, excellent 
condition. $1,450. Call 253-5806. 

7/18 



PERSONAL 



FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207-T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

8/15 



You are most welcomed to come 
every Tuesday at 7 p.m. for an 
informal gathering of The 
Christian Science College 
Organization. Hear how Truth 
and Love unfold good for all. 
Campus Center 809. 

8/15 



SERVICES 

AVOID an automotive RIP- 
OFF. No charge for estimates 
on repairs. All work guaranteed, 
at Spencer's Mobil 161 N. 
Pleasant St. (next to P.O.) 253- 
9050. 

HN» 

WANTED — Female Roommate 
to share house $50 a month rent, 
plus utilities. Call Evelyn 584- 
3673. 

7/13 



CLASSIFIED CLASHED 




Intramural Deadlines 



The following are Intramural Program special 
deadline announcements: 



SUMMER INTRAMURAL VOLLEYBALL 
Women's and Co-Rec Volleyball entries due 
today. 



Men's, Women's and Co-Rec Horseshoe 
&Women's Badminton) entries are also due 
today. 



Obtain entry forms at Boyden Intramural Office 
*215. Competition will run from July 17 - August 11. 



SUMMER INTRAMURAL SOFTBALL 
Women's and Co-Rec Softball entries due 
today. 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 

Cadet Wins Award 



WALTHAM -- A UMass student 
has been named winner of the 1972 
GTE Sylvania-Minutemen Award 
as the outstanding U. S. Army 
Reserve Officer Training Corps 
(ROTO cadet in Massachusetts. 

Michael W. Seddon, 21, of 15 
Vandergrift St., Lawrence, Mass., 
is the recipient of the award 
established in 1964 to encourage 
ROTC cadets to achieve a high 



degree of excellence in academic 
and military endeavors. 

An honor student majoring in 
political science, Cadet Seddon is 
in the upper 5 per cent of his ROTC 
unit. His academic performance 
and leadership ability have earned 
him the rank of Cadet First 
Lieutenant, the highest possible for 
his class. He is the first cadet from 
the UMass to win the award. 



Inside Astrology 



By Madeleine Monnet 
STELLAR PROFILE: 

WILLIAM KUNSTLER 

Uranian apostle of the New Age or legal 
rabble rouser?? William M. Kunstler 
born July 7, has, without thought of 
personal safety or gain, identified himself 
with the disparate "New Left." 

Cancerian Kunstler is one of the more 
controversial figures of our time. His 
courageous role as the "people's lawyer" 
began in the early 1960s with the advent of 
the "Freedom Riders." Blacks, mounted 
on buses, trains, and planes by the 
Congress of Racial Equality to tour and 
integrate the South, were arrested en 
masse. Kunstler who admittedly went to 
law school because " ; t offered status, 
prestige, and piomise of a reasonably 
high income,' wcs not t likely candidate 
for this struggle He is another Uranian 
type! "Uranian," my dears means that 
once you are convinced a way of thinking 
is right, heaven and earth may stand 
agaiist you, but v/on't stop you from 
following your ideals. Not only did 
Kun i tier get involved in their struggle for 
freedom, he became submerged. 

Sensitive and highly compassionate, 
Kunstler was strongly moved by the 
bravery of *he civil rights protestors. He 
went reluctantly to the aid of CORE 
lawyer Jack Young, but before the violent 
harassment of the "freedom riders" was 
resolved Kunstler came to a rude 
realization: "only by personal in- 
volvement can one justify his existence 
either to himself or his fellowmen!" Since 
then, he has specialized in protecting the 
rights of political dissenters, civil 
disobeyers, and the poor; for which he 
has been roundly criticized by many, 
including the American Bar Association. 
"If more members of the ABA were 
available for such work then perhaps I 
could be more catholic in my selection of 
clients," comments Kunstler. 

Uranus (planet of the New Age) 
powerfully identifies with mental at- 
titudes in his chart and reveals that 
through Utopian thinking, he would 
sacrifice much. Jupiter Uranian ruled, 
Kunstler is deeply touched by the cause of 
such people as Father Berrigan on the 
one hand, and the orphaned "7" on the 
other. He cannot bear to see them stand 
alone. His Cancerian Sun identifies with 
their suffering, Uranus understands their 
cause, and Moon in Scorpio is the natural 
champion of the underdog. 

He personally raises funds for the 
defense of his clients. When Kunstler 
stopped his profitable law practice some 
12 years ago, he had decided "you have to 
get off the economic escalation, learn to 
live simply. ..animals that overeat, die." 
Kunstler has considered joining a com 
mune. He loves to sit with the young, 
listen to their ideas and their music, but, 
the Cancerian ■ Jupiterian side of his 
nature has given up as much of life's 
comforts as he can willingly part with. 

Four years ago in Chicago his chart 
showed much stress, Kunstler went all 
the w?y out on his legal limb: "I have 
sat here and watched the objections 
denied and sustained by Your Honor, ana 
I know that this is not a fair trial. ..these 
men are going to jail by virtue of a legal 
lynching." The details of that trial are 
well known, K. is still not completely out 
from under the four year 13-day prison 
sentence Judge Hoffman dealt out before 
the jury so much as returned its verdict, 
in the next few years .Vm. K. is safer 
remaining above the 32 latitude line. 

Kunstler, if he had his druthers would 
sit 'neath a pecan tree and write poetry or 
other nuances of evolved meditation. 
Violence as a means of attaining social 
change, he frowns upon. Still he un 
derstands the disillusionment of those 
who first attempted change through 
peaceful means in the '40s. The pen has 
always been mightier than the sword. 
Even the Alpha Apes display the potency 
of exerting peaceful pressures. Those 
who openly rebel in their ranks are 
discarded as ultimate leaders! 

There are indications in K's chart that 
he can mediate and sway many through 
his writings and words in the next few 
years. He foresees Armageddon is upon 
us if changes are not made and soon. Here 
'S a prophet who has held hands with both 
sides, Kunstler's words may well be 
worthy of closer scrutiny! 

STAR TRENDS. The damper on the 
financial scene continues to spoil sum 
mers lightheartedness for many. 
Brighter prospects are possible come 
tail, find diversions in the Sun and coast a 
while. 

STELLAR SUCCESS GUIDE 

ARIES: (Mar. 21 Apr. 4) You energize 
with supermagnetism, making you hard 
'o resist (Apr. 5 19) A beautiful "en 
counter" opens new portals for sensitized 
experiences. 

TAURUS: (Apr. 20 May 5) 

Overeagerness shakes the empire; 
careful you don't throw the ball game. 
iMay a 20) Double-check all accounts 
and records as the coming weeks can 
reveal a costly error. 

GEMINI: (May 21 ■ June 4) You'll, 
never find the world more responsive to 
your sincere efforts • produce your best 
i June 7 21) Splendid rewards accrue to 
[nose who have kept on good terms with 
'he piper." 

CANCER: (June 22 July 7) If the In- 
ches are creeping up on you (and they 
we" may be) out a mirror on the 
refrigerator. (July I 22) One thing you 
won t lack for this year is the appropriate 
word for the occasion and right 
Programming for the problems. Your 
business judgement will be acute. If • 
door closes be certain there's a more 
Perfect portal n—r at hand on firmer 
foundations. 



LEO: (July 23 Aug. 7) Just right for 
finding that green glade and escaping it 
all with Gibran or Omar Khayyam. (Aug 
8 - 22) The power to conquer while 
keeping the harmony of love • a pattern 
suited to your needs. 

VIRGO: (Aug. 23 Sept. 7) Don't let 
yourself be led into a wishful thinking 
pattern, going nowhere (Sept. 8 22) 
Work closely with your best ally and 
make an extra effort to be gracious. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23 Oct. 7) A just-right 
tempo of activity brings your world into 
beautiful focus. (Oct. 8 - 22) Ideas play 
through with splendid brilliance, plan 
your pitch for next week 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 Nov. 7) Make 
haste slowly or vou'll spend all of your 
time backtracking. (Nov. 8-21) You gain 
advantages through making the right 
contacts. Watch a tendency to over- 
commit. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22- Dec. 7) Your 



follow up potion of energy is potent, push 
for results but with plenty of polish. (Dec. 
8 21) If your romance is giving off a 
wrong way ring, don't get discouraged, 
mediate. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 Jan. 5) A 
steady working pace toward fulfillment in 
the fall is your best plan. (Jan. 4 - 19) 
Ease off from pressuring those who might 
turn on you and are big enough to hurt 
your status. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 Feb. 3) Overt 
energy can misfire if not accompanied by 
plenty of finesse (Feb. 4 18) Your social 
appeal department is supercharged, but 
watch out for an overconfident attitude 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 Mar. 7) Don't let 
yourself be hoodwinked into sand castle 
type dreams; stay with reality. (Mar. 8 
20) Keep in harmony with the powerful 
and maintain a kind heart toward all. 



(Copyright, 
Syndicate, Inc.) 



1972, by United Feature 



THE MOUNT HCLYOKE COLLEGE 

SUMMER THEATRE South Had ley, Mass. 

proudly presents 
the intimate and urbane 

by Noel Coward 

Tues. — Sat. July 11 — 15at8:30p.m. 

Tickets $2.50 and $3.50 

students $1 off any ticket 

BOX OFFICE open 10 a.m.— 9 p.m. Daily Except Sunday 

Phone (413) 538-2406 

Coming: ANY WEDNESDAY July 18-22 




Crossword Puzzle 



Answer to Last Issue's Puzzle 



ACROSS 



1 
6 



Turf 
Part of 
church (pi.) 

11 Boil 

12 Wanted 

14 Teutonic 
deity 

15 Dowel 

17 Trick 

18 Danish land 
division 

20 Lavishes 
fondness on 

22 Number 

23 Planet 
25 Lasso 

27 Cent(abbr.) 

28 Breaks 
suddenly 

30 Storage 

rooms 
32 Greek letter 

34 Satiate 

35 Sea bird (pi.) 
38 Europeans 

41 Negative 
prefix 

42 Stories 

44 Irritate 

45 Once around 
track 

47 Insects 

49 Organ of 
hearing 

50 Short jacket 
52 Laments 

54 A state 
(abbr.) 

55 Calm 

57 Free from 
restraint 

59 Spirited 
horse 

60 American 
explorer 



Unit of 

Siamese 

currency 

Lean-to 

Spanish 

title 

Toughens 

Hebrew 

letter 

Stitch 

Prepare for 

print 

Choose 

Junctures 

Depressions 
16 Pertaining to 

the ear 

Characteristic 

Porticos 

Pastime 

Showy 

flower 
29 Vapor 
31 Weird 
33 Permitted 



4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 
11 
13 



19 
21 
24 
26 



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35 
36 
37 
39 

40 

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Puffs up 

Bristle 

Sounds 

loudly 

European 

finch 

Decoy 

(slang) 



46 
48 

51 
53 
56 
58 



3o 

Harbor 

Plumlike 

fruit 

Born 

Seed 

Compass point 

Spanish for 

"yes" 



DOWN 

European 
Note of 
scale 




United Feature Syndicate, Inc. 




Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 






x*>».-«»1 



THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1972 



Highlights 



MOVIES 

The Academy — 

"The French Connection" 9:00 

"Walkabout" 7:15 
Calvin — 

"Shaft's Big Score" 7 & 9, 1:30 
Matinee 
Amherst Cinema— 

"Shaft's Big Score" 7 & 9 
Campus Cinema 1 — 

"Play It Again Sam" 7 & 9 
Campus Cinema 2— 

"Clockwork Orange" 7 & 9: 15 
Campus Cinema 3 — 

"Eroticon" 7 & 9 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 1 — 

"McCabe & Mrs. Miller" 7:00 

"Cool Hand Luke" 9:30 Matinee 
1:45 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 2 — 

"Joe" 7:15-9: 15, Matinee 2:00 
Showcase — 

"Duck Your Sucker" 2:00-7:30-9:50 
Showcase— 

"The War Between Men & Women" 
2:00-7:30 9:40 
Showcase — 

"Napoleon & Samantha" 2:00-7:30- 
9:20 
Showcase — 

"Portnoy's Complaint" 2:00-7:30- 
9:40 
Showcase — 

"The Godfather" 2:00-8:00 
Maiestic — 

"Monda Erotica" & "The Wild- 
cats" 
Red Rock — 

"Cowboys" & "The Omega Man" 
Deerfield — 

"Red Sun" & "Le Mans" 
Hadley Drive-In — 

"The French Connection", "The 
Boston Strangler", showtime 8:30 

July 18 

Double feature film en- 
tertainment: "The Birds" at 7 p.m. 
and "What Ever Happened to Baby 
Jane?" at 9 p.m. Campus Center 
Auditorium. 

Music 

Concert, MARTIN BEST, 
BALLADEER WITH LUTE AND 
GUITAR,* PM. LOWER GARDENS 
ADJACENT TO Infirmary (if rain: 
Memorial Hall). 



TANGLEWOOD 
July 14 

7:00 p.m. Weekend Prelude - Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players with 

Peter Serkin - Chamber Music of 

Beethoven. 

9:00 p.m. WILLIAM STEINBERG - 

Beethoven Program - Symphony No. 

6, Symphony No. 5. 

July 15 

10:30 a.m. Open Rehearsal 

8:30 p.m. WILLIAM STEINBERG - 
Beethooven Program - Symphony 
No. 1, Symphony No. 9 - Jeannine 
Crader, Joanna Simon, Dean Wilder, 
Robert Hale, Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus, John Oliver, Director. 
July H 

2:30p.m. SEIJI OZAWA - Beethoven 
Program - Triple Concerto - Joseph 
Silverstein, Jules Eskin, Peter Serkin 

Symphony No. 4 Choral Fantasy: 
Peter Serkin, Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus, John Oliver, Director. 



AlligatorRecaptured 



PLAYSANDMUSICALS 

THE BOY FRIEND, July 13-5, Arena 

Civic Theatre, Greenfield, Phone 773- 

7991. 

PRIVATE LIVES, July 11-15, Mt. 

Holyoke College, South Hadley, 

Phone 538-2406. 

JACQUES BREL IS ALIVE AND 

WELL AND LIVING IN PARIS, July 

12-15, Music Theatre Workshop, West 

Springfield, Phone 788-0258. 

THE EMPEROR'S NEW CLOTHES, 

July 15, Williston Academy, 

Easthampton, Phone 527-1520. 

LYSISTRATA, July 14-15, Springfield 

Free Theatre, Phone 569-6490. 

LAST OF THE RED HOT LOVERS, 

July 11-15, Williamstown Summer 

Theatre, Williamstown, Phone 458- 

8146. 



EXHIBITS 
July 11-30 Pen and Ink drawings of 
the American Indian: THE OLD 
ONES by Walter J. McCurdy. 
July 11-15 REFLECTIONS 

photographs by John Smith, Student 
Union Art Gallery 1-6 p.m. 



Announced Convention and 
Convention-Related Programs 
THURSDAY 

7:00 a.m. (3, 7) CBS Morning News: 
Convention Reports. 

7:00 a.m. (4, 20, 22, 30) Today: 
Convention reports. 

7:00 p.m. (3, 4, 7, 20), 7:30 p.m. (10 
22, 24, 30, 57), 9:30 p.m. (5,8,40) 
Fourth session coverage: Balloting 
for Vice President; acceptance 
speeches. 
FRIDAY 

7:00 a.n. (3, 7) CBS Morning News: 
Convent on reports. 

7:00 a.m. (4, 20, 22, 30) Today: 
Convention reports. 

8:00 p.m. (24, 57) Washington Week 
in Review: A post convention report 
is scheduled. 



THURSDAY 

8:00 p.m. JEAN SHEPARD'S 
AMERICA (24)-Same as Tuesday 
9:30 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. HOLLYWOOD 

TELEVISION THEATRE (24, 57)- 
"Picture a police state with no one to 
police...." 
FRIDAY 

5:00 p.m. BASEBALL ( 18)- 
Athletics vs. Yankees. 

8:30 p.m. MOVIE: "The Spiral 
Road" (4) Rock Hudson and Burl 
Ives star in this 1962 movie. Viewers 
gave it a low rating in that year. 

8:30 p.m. COMEDY (20, 22, 30) CBS 
introduces its three new comedy 
shows, one of which stars Arte 
Johnson. 

8:30 p.m. SPACE BETWEEN 
WORDS (24) Documentary on in- 
terpersonal communication. 

8:30 p.m. EVENING AT POPS (57)- 
Doc Sever insen is featured. 

9:00 p.m. ELIZABETH R (3)- 
Second in this six-part series. Best 
viewing feature this evening. 

9:00 p.m. MOVIE: "The Face of 
Fear" (7, 10)-Elizabeth Ashley stars 
in a mystery with a very interesting 
twist. 

9:30 DEVOUT YOUNG (24)-First in 
a four-part series examining the 
Jesus movement. 



Berger Lectures In Israel 



Professor Bernard Berger, head 
of the Water Resources Research 
Center. UMass, is at present in 
Jerusalem. Israel, as a participant 
in the Sixth International Con- 
ference on Water Pollution 
Research. 

Over 1,200 delegates from 44 
countries are participating in the 
conference, which is dealing with 
practical measures that can be 
taken, and are being taken around 
the globe, to cope with two of 
mankind's most pressing problems 
- water shortage and water 
pollution. 



Professor Berger noted that 
there was a strong note of op- 
timism at the conference: people 
were not prophets of doom. Water 
pollution could be checked - if men 
were prepared to pay the price. 

"I have been very struck by the 
willingness of the developing 
countries to take steps to prevent 
pollution as the price of rapid 
development. They are willing and 
anxious to learn from our 
mistakes, to avoid the pollution as 
a consequence of industrialization 
that plagues developed countries. 

It was very fitting that the 



conference should take place in 
Israel, which had such a 
remarkable record of water 
development, using 92 per cent of 
its water resources to make an arid 
land productive, said Professor 
Berger. Now Israel was moving 
into the next stage, re-using waste 
waters. "It is much cheaper to 
treat and re-use effluent, which is 
99.9 per cent pure, than to 
desalinate sea water," Professor 
Berger pointed out. "Israel has the 
will and the technologists to make 
use of waste water, and to control 
the pollution from which she is 
suffering because of her rapid 
industrialization." 



O'Brien: "It's Intolerable" 



MIAMI BEACH. Fla. AP — 

Lawrence F O'Brien, a Springfield 
native, is a rarity among political 
chairmen. He uses tact, humor and 
persuasion where many others 
have wielded gavel and raw power. 

Can anyone imagine tough 
autocratic Sam Rayburn-who used 
to be as much a convention figure 
as bands and banners-smiling from 
the rostrum and imploring 
"please, please, in the aisle right in 
front of me... please have your 
reunion later"? 



But that's how O'Brien does it. 
And it works. 



"Going into that large hall, with 
those thousands of people and 
wielding a gavel. I was curious in 
my own mind about how I would 
faro tboiit how well I might bo 
! r *ri< r 



i .<" 



1h 



it over with. It's going to be quite 
an experience. This is something I 
can't envision... 



"It could have been and it still 
could be a very disturbing ex- 
perience or a personal disaster." 

O'Brien betrayed no ner- 
vousness. He had spent some 30 
hours with parliamentarian James 
O'Hara and other members of the 
convention staff discussing all the 
possible parliamentary problems 
and he was prepared to make the 
many decisions that only the 
chairman can make. 

"This is my first experience on 

the podium," said O'Brien, who 

had a reputation as a political 

Merlin in the successful 1960 

presidential campaign of John F. 

Kennedy "I've had very limited 

experience in chairing meetings. 

I'm not a parliamentarian." 

h chairman felt "revved up" 

"Penh •:' night session 

■ \ m his 



16th-floor suite to unwind and chew 
over the session. It was 7:30 before 
he went to bed and he was up again 
at 10 to receive a call from Sen. 
Edmund Muskie. 



Even during the tough creden- 
tials fight. O'Brien had few oc- 
casions to chide the delegates for 
disorder. 



"You try to be as persuasive as 
you can... 



"Eighty-five per cent of these 
people are new, at their first 
convention and yet the milling and 
the renewing of acquaintances and 
the chatting and the chattering 
here and there frankly was not as 
extensive as I've seen in previous 
conventions. 



"It's intolerable," O'Brien 
finally said. But then he added: 

"Aw, come on fellows," he said, 
"lot's work together." 



While museum personnel were 
trying to see an eclipse that wasn't, 
a Florida native staged a walkout 
in Springfield yesterday. 



A two-and-a-half-foot baby 
alligator strolled out of his tank at 
the Springfield Museum of Science, 
walked down two flights of steps, 
out the front door, across the 
museum quadrangle, and into the 
back yard of radio station WSPR 
before museum officials caught up 
with him. 

"I'm glad we got him back 
before he made it to the street," 
Museum Director Frank D. 
Korkosz said of the eight-year old 
adventurous reptile. 

Korkosz said the alligator made 
his escape around 3:15, when just 
about everyone at the museum was 
busy trying to get a good look at the 
approaching solar eclipse. 



when the tank door was opened the 
alligator saw his chance and just 
walked right out," Korkosz said. 

"He probably heard about the 
eclipse and decided to go have a 
look," Korkosz said laughingly. 

This isn't the first time the baby 
alligator has sought to satisty nis 
curiosity about the outside world. 
Three years ago, according to 
Korkosz, the animal slipped out of 
his tank and popped up at a special 
school class in the museum's 
planetarium. 

"There he was in the front row, 
standing on his front legs, hissing," 
Korkosz recalled. 

r J ester day the alligator was 
retrieved by two planetarium 
lecturers Brian Twohig and 
Richard Sanderson, who placed 
him gingerly into a net and brought 
him back to his tank 



"We had repairmen installing The baby reptile is now in 
air conditioning, and one of our maximum security according to 
aquarium guards was out sick, so Korkosz. 

Vice Raid Backfires 

MIAMI — Officers of the Miami 
vice squad were assigned an 
unusual job — returning, instead of 
confiscating, erotic literature at a 
suburban book store. 

For several hours recently four 
detectives worked neatly 
arranging about 4000 "adult" 
books and magazines for Ray 
Brown, manager of the Fig Leaf 
Book Store. 

The books were removed May 12 
after criminal court Judge Murray 
Goodman moved his court to the 
Fig Leaf, thumbed through the 
books and then ordered them 
confiscated. 

Judge Goodman said: "It would 
appear that this is an operation 
that panders to pornography." 

But US District Court Judge 
William Mehrtens disagreed with 
the confiscation and gave Good- 



man, the State Attorney's Office 
and the Metro Public Safety 
Department 24 hours to return 25 
cartons of books and magazines 
valued at between $18,000 and 
$20,000. 

And, Mehrtens ordered, the 
books must be returned to the 
same spot from which they were 
taken. 

Detective Robert Tebbe said the 
officers were caught in the middle. 
"One judge orders us to take the 
books down; then another orders 
us to take them back." 

Brown said the removal of the 
books cost him money and "good 
will." His attorney, Paul Gerson, 
said that in addition to a 
restraining order against Judge 
Goodman and the State Attorney's 
Office he will seek damages in 
excess of $100,000. 



Letters 

Yes, do send in your comments 
on campus life, international af- 
fairs, national emergencies, etc. 
All we demand is that all letters to- 
the-editor be typed on a sixty-space 
line, one side of each page, double- 
spaced. 



5-Colhge 

Info 
545-2566 



Review 

Brel- Alive and Well 



ByEDNAZUCKER 

Reviving a demanding 26 
Jacques Brel songs on life, the 
Music Theatre Workshop 
displayed excellent talent in their 
performance last night at the 
Mittineague Methodist Church in 
West Springfield. 

Unlike the usual musical, there 
is essentially no plot to hamper 
one's enjoyment of a purely 
musical experience. The scenery, 
colors, lighting, acoustics and 
superior voices of the cast (Shirley 
Schuster. John Schuster, Linda 
Cirelli, and Paul Watson) combine 
to transport the audience from 



their chairs to Brel's world, 
covering a variety of style, and 
depth in his interpretation of love 
loneliness, and alienation. 

So taxing is the volume of songs 
that two casts are needed. If last 
night's performance by the 
alternate cast is any indication of 
the quality of the original, one will 
not be disappointed no matter 
which cast is performing. 

The production is the only one in 
this area for summer en- 
tertainment, and will be presented 
through July 15th. For a truly 
enjoyable evening of music, see 
"Jacques Brel is Alive and Well 
and Living in Paris". 






University of Massachusetts 
July 18, 1972 Volume I. Issue 6 

"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Gillmor, 'The Alumnus' 
Cop ManyWriting Awards 



UMass alumni magazine "The Alumnus" and its 
editor, Katie Gillmor, have received another round of 
honors for excellence, including a top national award 
for writing. 

In competition against the leading alumni 
publications in the U.S. and Canada, the magazine 
won the Atlantic magazine first prize for excellence 
in writing and placed among the top ten in the country 
in the American Alumni Council's awards for overall 
excellence. It also won a regional runner-up spot in 
the Newsweek magazine competition for public af- 
fairs coverage. 



The basis of the Atlantic magazine award was an 
article in the December/January issue by Mrs. 
Gillmor entitled "Who's in Charge Here?", an in- 
depth examination of the October resignation of 
Chancellor Oswald Tippo. 

Judging is by a committee of writers. In making the 
award the committee called the UMass magazine 
"the most consistently readable, the most in- 
trinsically interesting, the most economical, the most 



efficiently edited and the most stylish". The award 
includes a Steuben Glass star trophy. 

The magazine was cited as "cleanly-designed, well- 
written and forthright" in the American Alumni 
Council top ten competition. The UMass publication 
shared the honor with magazines from such in- 
stitutions as Yale, Harvard, Swarthmore, Brown, 
Cornell and MIT. 

In the Newsweek competition, the UMass Alumnus 
was runner-up behind Boston University in Region 1, 
the northeast. The award is made to magazines "that 
bestrelate their institution to public affairs and 
issues". 

The Alumnus has already won a number of awards 
for covers, appearance and content, including the top 
1971 award in the Time/Life improvement in 
magazine publishing competition. 

The 32-page magazine is published five times per 
year and circulates to the 37,000 alumni of the 
University. Graphic design is by Richard Hendel, 
designer for the University of Massachusetts Press. 
Mrs. Gillmor, a 1965 graduate of Brandeis University, 
has been editor since 1968. 



Okamoto Sentenced to Life 



LOD, Israel — Japanese radical 
Kozo Okamoto was sentenced to 
life imprisonment Monday for his 
part in the Lod airport massacre 
May 30. The presiding judge told 
the 24-year-old defendant he had 
excommunicated himself from 
human society by his "horrifying 
crime." 

The three-judge military court 
found him guilty of all four charges 
in the airport machine-gun and 
grenade attack that killed 26 



persons, including Okmamoto's 
two accomplices, and wounded 70. 
He was convicted in one count, of 
engaging in the attack for an Arab 
guerrilla organization, the Popular 
Front for the Liberation of 
Palestine. 

Three of the charges carried the 
death penalty but only one person- 
Nazi war criminal Adolf Eich- 
mann-has been executed since 
Israel became a state in 1948. 



Featured Today 



Lisa Costello takes a look at 
University Press-See page 3. 



Golden Oldie Revival-See page 
5. 



Under Israeli military law, a life 
sentence means just that; it is 
served until death, with no 
provision for parole or time off for 
good behavior. The single ex- 
ception would be in the event of a 
general presidential pardon on the 
occasion of a great event, such as 
victory in the 1967 war. 

As the court president, Lt. Col. 
Abraham Frisch, read the court's 
findings, which took 11 minutes, 
the diminutive defendant stood at 
attention, staring straight ahead. 

When the death penalty was 
ruled out, Okamoto appeared to 
scowl. 

Before and during the trial he 
repeatedly asked to be allowed to 
commit suicide or to receive the 
death penalty. 





Katie Gillmor, 'Alumnus' editor, has received another round of 
awards for this past year's issues. 

Patriots Arrive 
For Summer Practice 



The rains came 



UMass students participate In a White Roots of Peace ceremonial dance, last Wednesday evening, 
finishing up an all day program of Indian culture, which included movies, folkwares, literature, and 
lectures. (Photo by Lam Gold) 



By ED BRYANT 
SPECIAL TO THE CRIER 

It is hot outside, far too hot for 
any activity other than swimming, 
perspiring, or drinking. Yet for 
ninety-three members of the New 
England Patriots, it is time to play 
football, time to win a spot on the 44 
man roster the Patriots will take 
into the regular season. Two-a-day 
practices in pads began yesterday, 
as Coach John Mazur and his staff 
begin their selection of those 
players competing for perhaps 
thirty openings on this year's 
squad. 

This past weekend the team took 
physical examinations. Four first- 
year players failed to pass because 
of knee injuries. The big news, 
however, was the failure of Steve 
Kiner because of a groin pull which 
has not healed from last season. 
Kiner, one of the outstanding 
outside linebackers in the National 
Football League, is an important 
man in the Patriot's plans. Should 
he be unable to play, the Patriots 
will be hard-pressed to fill his 
shoes. It would be a big disap- 
pointment to Amherst fans as well ; 
Kiner, a great player with the 
longest hair on the team, is very 
popular on Sunday afternoons at 
Quicksilver. 

In addition to the physical, the 
players were tested on Chin-ups, 
dips, the mile, and the 40-yard 
dash. To my knowledge (based on 
incomplete data) Reggie Rucker 
led the team in chin-ups, John 
Outlaw ran the fastest 40, and 
Clarence Scott had the best time 
tor the mile. 

The only players not in camp are 
John Tarver, a rookie running 
back who is training for the College 
All- Star game against the Super 
Bowl Champions, and Mike 
Taliaferro, who has been "excused 
from camp". One of the worst kept 
secrets in town is that Taliaferro 
has asked to be traded. Poor Mike. 
In New York he had to play behind 
Joe Namath; after he came here 
he ran into Joe Knapp, and now 
Jim Plunkett, who will be 
remembered as one of the greats 
long after no one can remember 
how to pronounce Taliaferro's 
name. Perhaps the Playboy article 



will be the beginning for happier 
days for Mike Taliaferro. General 
Manager Bell has been on the 
phone trying to work out a trade. 
That announcement may well 
come later today, but at press time 
no deal had been made. 

General Manager Bell has been 
busy on that phone of his, however. 
Already during the Pat's stay in 
Amherst he has sent Ron Sellers 
and Ike Lassiter to new teams. 
Sellers, the Patriots Numer One 
draft pick three years ago, has not 
lived up to his promise here. 
Beaten out last year by Randy 
Vataha, Hubie Bryant, Reggie 
Rucker, and Eric Crabtree. Sellers 
was unhappy here and said so. Bell 
dealt him to Dallas for a draft 
choice. The Cowboys have several 
outstanding receivers, but they 
traded Margene Adkins during the 
off-season, and Sellers figures to 
make the team. 

Lassiter, obtained two years ago 
from the Oakland Raiders, was 
sent to Washington for a draft 
choice. This leaves the Patriots 
without an "Ike" for the first time 
in memory. A defensive end, 
Lassiter did not figure to play this 
year, with fierce competition 
coming up for berths on the 
defensive line. The only question 
about the trade is whether or not 
Washington actually owned its 
draft choice when it traded it to 
New England. George Allen, 
Washington Coach, treats draft 
choices like mosquitoes, shooing 
them away as quickly as he can, 
and in the process sometimes 
trades the same draft choice twice. 
But presumably Be!l, who may yet 
make Red Auerbach look like an 
amateur, took care to check that 
the draft choice was Allen's to 
trade before he made the deal. 

Another player who was listed o: 
the roster but is no longer here is 
Bill Atessis, a defensive tackle who 
left camp Monday morning 
Atessis was an All- American at the 
University of Texas before a knee 
injury. Obtained from Baltimore 
last year, he looked healthy Sun- 
day. He did twenty dips, which is 
something for a man that big. I do 
not know why he left, but there is 
one less man trying out as a 
defensive tackle. 



rage Two — university ot Massachusetts — Thj^TJiL. 



r 



The Crier is a semi-weekly pub 
University of Massachusetts. Offu 
Student Activities Area, Unive 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is en 

codv is censored by the administration x>fore Publication. Represented for 
national advertising by National Educational Advertising Serv.ces, Inc. 



ation of the Summer Session 1972, 

ire located in the Campus Center, 

ity of Massachusetts, Amherst, 

>ly responsible for the contents. No 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

GilSalk.BrendaFurtak 

PERFORMING ARTS EDITOR ,_, „ ou . t El i en i£S 

PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 

I OCCASIONAL EDITORIAL CARTOONIST 



Campus Carousel 



TUESDAY, JULY 18, 1972 



Music 



TUESDAY, JULY 18, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Three 



., muv rn anite The story resulted from a pick- The result is that that the college 

Monica College -££ ^SSSSS^A S.-BtMa£SB2 



Reflections, to carry the 



all, last 
half -clad 



Shelly Karp 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



of a nude male. After 
year's issue showed a 
female burning her bra. 

But Editor Susan Yanok says she 
doesn't think nude males will 
become a trend. "It's too easy to 
get guys to take their clothes off." 



Cuba will need 22,477 junior high students in the decision-making 
teachers by 1*76. They will produce process aroused the comment of 
only about 2,000 teachers in the 



interim. 
Dwight 



Allen, where 

**** 



**** 



SGA president that it was an 
"example of the lack of respon- 
are you? sibility of students in the eyes of 
the administration. 

"If we are responsible for the 
success or failure of events, we 



Art Buchwald 



HOPEFUL HEADLINE OF THE 
WEEK appears in The Vidette of 
UNoIllinois: "Cuba Has Shortage 
of Teachers." 



The McGovern Tapes 



NOISE POLLUTION is 

disrupting Georgia State's Spring 

Festival of music, according to a should be responsible for whether 

page one piece in the campus' they are called rff, he said. 

S, Setms that a petition signed by MEANWHILE the Portland 

100 merchants in the area have (Ore) State U. Vanguard reports 

complained about amplified band that a PSU student who attempted 

concerts as being "noisy" and to pay a $10 traffic fine by check 



TOP SECRET 

Memo to C. White House 

From H. Miami, Florida 

I bugged the McGovern 
headquarters as per your in- 
structions. Sorry for tardiness of 
transcript of tapes, but they were 
typed by Cuban refugees who 
planned Bay of Pigs operation. 

Here in a nutshell is what we 
found out by listening in to his 
Doral Hotel suite. 

Despite denials, McGovern is 
still a stalking horse for Teddy 
Kennedy. The plan is for 
McGovern to campaign until 
November. Then, if he wins the 
election, he will ask Kennedy to be 
sworn in as President in his place. 
The McGovern strategists figure 
this is the only way Kennedy will 
accept the Presidency in 1972. 

In exchange for bowing out as 
President, McGovern is going to be 
rewarded by being made secretary 
of agriculture. This will help him 
with his electorate in South 
Dakota. The Kennedy people have 
agreed to this in principle. 

The tapes also indicate that the 
reason the McGovern strategists 
selected Tom Eagleton as the vice 
presidential candidate is that the 
American people are ready for a 
calm Administration after the 
excitement of Nixon's last four 
years. 

They feel the people will buy the 
steady plodding manner of 
McGovern and Eagleton after 
living with the swinging glamorous 
Nixons. 




This is a direct quote from the 
tapes by McGovern's top advisers. 

"The people are fed up withstyle. 
We have to admit Nixon has 
charisma, but Americans want 
something more." 

"Right. They're tired of reading 
about those wild bowling parties at 
Camp David and those raucous 
prayer breakfasts at the White 
House." 

"You can say that again. They're 
sick of all the stories about Pat 
Nixon's clothes and her hair- 
dresser." 

"Not to mention David and 
Julie's high jinks in the Navy." 

"Let's offer them a candidate- 
two candidates who may not set the 
world on fire like the Nixons do, but 
at least have substance." 

The rest of the tape is blurred. 



The bugging also revealed that 
the McGovern people plan to make 
the big issue of the campaign non- 
union lettuce. They're going to 
claim Agnew has eaten 3,456 salads 
at fund-raising dinners since he's 
been Vice President and not one of 
the leaves had a union label on it. 

There were some serious 
brainstorming sessions on how 
McGovern was going to end the 
war in Vietnam. The plan is to 
announce just before November 
that if the Democrats are elected to 
the White House the President will 
promote Colonel Harlan Sanders of 
Kentucky Fried Chicken fame to 
general and put him in charge of 
the withdrawal of all American 
troops 



"disrupting business". The 
business people threatened to with- 
draw their financial support of 
scholarships if future rock con- 
certs were not volume-controlled. 

Money, Money 



had it bounced - but not because of 
lack of funds. 

He had made it out to "Running 
Dog Capitalist Pig District Court - 
Parking Tag Division". 



Under The Coop 



By JAMES GOLD 

Although a student co-op, as reported in the July 6 Crier, 
sounds like a fine idea on the surface, a close examination 
reveals that it will sell mostly luxury items. This is not 
where the priorities of the Student Senate should lie. 

The article quotes Senate Treasurer Robert Chiller as 
saying that "goods not offered by the University Store" 

Also the tapes revealed it was no will be sold by the Student Co-op. 
accident that McGovern and what is wrong with selling goods which are offered by 

the University Store, but at a discount for UMass 
students? The University Store should not maintain a near 
monopoly on textbook sales at 5% discounts when a 
student co-op (or any store) should be able to offer 
discounts of 15%-25%. 
Items si^h as stereo equipment, ski equipment, 

IS^p^U^t-A- r efri r ra T , a 1 d "7IJ" aT t ? ot tbe f sen,ials ne ?£ 

right. °y a11 students to get through four or five years at the 

By going on all three networks at University . 
3 o'clock Friday morning the students require textbooks, paperback books, paper, 

pencils, pens, and notebooks first. Most of these items sold 
by the University Store are offered at no discount at all. 
Before the Senate tries to compete with commercial 
merchandisers in Amherst and Hadley , it should first try 
to lower prices for essential goods on campus. 



Eagleton made their acceptance 
speeches in Miami Beach at 3 
o'clock in the morning 

This was part of McGovern 
strategy to put a coalition of 
minorities together to win the 
election. The only minority 
McGovern hadn't won ovsr to his 



McGovern forces sewed up the 
insomniac vote. Nobody else ever 
paid any attention to insomniacs 
before and they could easily swing 
the election. 

Copyright 1972, Los Angeles 
Times. 



Beat The Big Drums (Our Revolutionary Heritage) 



By WILLIAM PULLEY 

In the primitive becoming of the man- 
animal, he protected his tribe and village 
from the ravages of the enemy by beating 
big-drums that echoed loud warnings to 
other villages-a technique that prevails in 
primitive societies even to this present day. 
But today, we receive warnings of danger 
through our news media and television 
which now informs us that a world-wide 
social revolution is in progress and that the 
'enemy' takes the form of racism, super- 
nationalism, bigoted organized-religion and 
class-conflict. We have studied what the 
news-media and reason name as the enemy 
and find that these are truly the most basic 
of influences that disrupt and disunify our 
species and are indeed a hindrance to our 
progress. Obviously, the forms the enemy 
takes are many. 

Thus, the traditional forces upon which we 
hung our loyalties in our primitive and 
present becoming, no longer serve our need 
and must be seen as the enmy. And why*' 
Because time, change chance and con- 
ditions endlessly alter human situations and 
perception, while nature's forces also 
destroy old forms and create new forms. 
And out of this all, grow the demands for 
change to modify and eventually abandon 
much of our (former) beloved traditional 
values and make way for the greater reality 
we call a global-society and an Age of 
Reason 

In this new setting, even the so-called 
unlettered or peasant is seen to feel our time 
in history and the global-society we all 
created without planning it. And, education, 
science and socialistic advance shows 
evidence of the high potential of the man- 
animal if and when he throws off the weight 
of ignorance and conceited men (who 
demand followers, dominance and power) 
and takes on the attributes of the altruist 
and the humanist. Now at long last, we are 
able to identify the "brain-washers' who 



condition and programme the consciousness 
of men, even as the modern computors 
programme business transactions or 
predict events yet to come. We also can 
envision the day when the common-man' 
can fully- understand that hereditary un- 
foldment is a mechanical force that we all 
created. Now we abandon the many 
superstitions ignorance etched into our 
memory-patterns. And today we have fir- 
mly identified that 'enemy' that threaten 
society and if we fail to beat the big-drums 
and unify the constructive element among 
us, the social advance that change and 
conditions provided must be lost. 

In other words, the hour has come for 
constructive revolutionary action and a 
careful study of our history of revolution 
that we might not repeat our mistakes and 
oversights but carry the new insights for- 
ward for many generations of youth to use. 
In this thought we are reminded that con- 
ditions have always decided the success or 
failure of advancing consciousness and 
educational benefits, a guideline we can 
depend upon This guideline indicates that 
conditions in the 18th and 19th Centuries 
were hami>ered by the presence and power 
of imperialism which flourished throughout 
the world, airing the mind of men for revolt 
and preparing the mental-soil for the new 
seed of revolution which took place in 
France, America, Russia and China as a 
chain -reaction against imperialism. 

Later, World-Wars I and II broke the 
chains that bound the minds of millions of 
slave-mentalities and now the names of 19th 
Century revolutionaries again make the 
headlines to spark into existence new names 
equally as vital and electrifying as a Marx, 
Engels, Lenin or Dr. Sun Yat Sen. Now, the 
new guidelines point up the end of im- 
perialism in the hands of greedy and short- 
sighted men. And most important, the new 
guidelines describe the meaning and social 
impact of a global -society upon a world now 



ready for effective and lasting social ad- 
vance. The new values for a global-society 
are put into contrast with outmoded values 
and men feel proud of their revolutionary 
heritage. The mental picture of a "people's 
country'' was inscribed upon the mind of 
millions by able journalists who reported 
the on-the-scene experience in socialist 
countries and in Mainland-China in par- 
ticular. For the first time in the history of 
humankind, a world-wide social revolution 
was in progress and with this came the 
impact and meaning of the inter- 
dependence of countries-that no man (or 
country) is 'an island into itself. The worker 
at all levels of social, scientific and in- 
dustrial action are now "beating the big- 
drums" to warn of the enemies to human 
progress and eny the natural unfoldment of 
a global-society. 

Pick up an history-book that deals 
honestly with construtive revolutionary 
movement and you will bear witness to how 
revolutions failed, and why they failed. It 
will be shown that they filed because they 
did not or could not carry the revolutionary 
force and higher objectives forward to a 
point where they truly became stable 
enough to uphold and sustain the best in- 
terests of the worker and the idea of "rule by 
the worker". The butcher, the baker and the 
candlepstick maker, to include the white- 
collared element who labor in office and 
factory to administrate and provide us with 
economic know-how and creature needs-all 
of these are the workers because they 
contribute to posterity and are not the idle 
drones and money-barons who cleverly put 
the worker under a vice-like control of 
police, army and state. 

When we pernit our environment to 
stagnate in the grip of corruption 
ideological fixations and traditional com- 
pulsions, at that very time we stand in need 
of revolution And reflecting on our ten 

w " ■ ' d ■- n • Bdictions 



we humans have buried deeply in our 
hereditary force, we can better understnad 
why our struggle to survive and improve our 
species is an endless process-a process that 
explodes with revellious force when crushed 
under the domination of men who oppose 
change because it threatens their 
dominance. These, we must teach our youth 
to quickly identify as the despoilers-the self- 
centered element who demand followers, 
demonance and adoration. They are indeed 
but a phase of the hereditary process that 
produce 'baby-gods' and despots with 
silvery and soothing tongues but who in 
reality are the despoilers and the creators of 
suffering and illusion. 

Such is the experience and opinion of this 
author who dedicated himself to the work of 
East-West cultural exchange back in the 
early 1940's when there was a dire need of 
individuals and groups to begin the long- 
range work of building support for a global- 
society and universal-thinking. Thousands 
of us fanned out all over the world to teach a 
doctrine of unity and co-existeuce. But in 
1947, 'McCarthyism' and hate propaganda 
began its ugly influence of destroying East- 
West cultural exchange and now political 
opportunism and Vietnam conflict has 
spelled out the death of an influence that 
might have prevented this present chaos 
Now, if it is not too late, we must quickly and 
wisely study and act upon the guidelines 
that our heritage in social revolution in- 
scribed in the mind of many and in the pages 
of history that we might not forget our duty 
to posterity and human decency. Failing to 
do this, is to openly admit that we are not 
worth of higher insights and enlightenment 
that many have given their lives to create 
over the painful centuries that produced 
living and dying things. Let us beat the big- 
drums loudly that all contributors to 
progress at social and professional levels 
might hear them and act to halt the trend to 
deeper chaos 






Leone Stein: keeping up on the heart beat (Left). Sue Lorraine is sad about the move 
(middle). Take my word for it, it's not this officie (right). (Photos by Larry Gold) 



UMass Press-Part I 



Stein Terms Press Coherent 



By LISA CASTILLO 

When the University Press 
receives phone calls from 
disconcerted mothers who want to 
make arrangements for a linen 
service, something is definitely 
wrong. The University Press is not 
a laundry. It is a book publishing 
house and a very distinguished one 
at that. 

Why have we not heard much 
about the mission of the University 
Press, its operations, its problems, 
its accomplishments? Why is it 
that the excitement of the new 
library with its twenty eight stories 
of solidarity, practically 
obliterates from our minds the 
existance of part of an establish- 
ment without which there would be 
no volumes for to fill the hollow 
structure? 

Unfortunately, bad news often 
times captures our attention more 
readily than good. 

In a recent New York Times 
report nationwide financial dif- 
ficulties for University Press were 
discussed. 

Sensitively aware of the very 
heart beat of the press, director 

Leone Stein who has been with the 
organization since its embryonic 
beginnings in 1963 says, 
"Publishing is a very coherent 
business, it is the dovetailing of a 
lot of taient into one creative ef- 
fort." When the UMass press 
dovetails its talents, the result is a 
book that gains renown in many 
intellectual centers of the world. 

Not only does it gain distinction 
amongst a concentrated group of 
scholarly readers but among other 
quality conscious publishing 
houses as well. The UMass Press is 
responsible for both the textual 
content and the physical qualities 
of a book. 

Just as the writer is directly 
involved with the content of the 
book, the press must decide which 
writers they will print. "The 
purpose of the University Press is 
to publish scholarship that might 
not otherwise be printed," said 
Dean Appley of the graduate 
school. "Scholarly work" is the 
term most quoted concerning the 
content of the text. The staff 
constantly keeps alert for new 
manuscripts. According to the 
editor.Paul Wright, "You get a 
sense of what's going on in a 
certain field and then try to find 
someone who's doing it." 

From their book, Black and 
White in American Culture: An 
Anthology from the Massachusetts 
Review, Wright, who also runs 
poetry program, contacted one of 
the poets, James Scully, for more 
of his work. From that, a collection 
of poems called Avenue of the 
Americas by Scully, has just been 
released. 

Because Arthur Ben Ch.tty, who 
was at a cocktail party one evening 
with a manuscript in his briefcase, 
happened to chat with the director 
Stein, the book, Ely: Too Black Too 
White the special account of a 
mulatto is now available to the 
public. 

Due to the good fortune of the 
Press and the Stein's dedication 
(which are by general consensus 



one in the same) the previously 
unpublished papers of Dr. William 
Edward Burghardt DuBois have 
come into the hands of the UMass 
Press. 

According to a Press news 
release, "The late Dr. DuBois was 
born in February 1868 in Great 
Barrington, Maas. He was founder 
of the National Associaton of the 
Advancement of Colored People 
and the Pan-African Movement. A 
profound scholar in history, 
sociology and anthropology, he 
died in 1963 after an extraordinary 
career spent fighting racism and 
colonialism. Several of his many 
works are acknowledged classics, 
notably The Soul of Black Folk 
(1903) and Black Reconstruction 

(1935).'' The acquistion of these 
important papers will certainly 
enhance the position of the Press. 

Manuscripts have been known to 
show up on the doorstep and in the 
ail. Also, University faculty 
members and local residents have 
been known for their casual ap- 
pearances at the office in Munson 
Hall, to inform the press on new 
possibilities for books. 

However, since the Press's 
recent move to a little grey house 
in the Orchard Hill area, members 
of the Press seem a bit nostalgic 
and worried that "no one knows 
where we are anymore." The new 
address is 506 East Pleasant St., 
Amherst, diagonally opposite the 
water towers. 

Concerning the new location, 

"It's cooler down here and more 
comfortable, too," commented 
Jerry Zamansky whose office is in 
the basement. Zamansky thinks 
Munson was a "perfect location, 



right in the middle of everything." 
He is affected by the new location 
in that running errands on campus 
entails a bit more traveling than at 
Munson Hall. "I use the director's 
car though, it's got that sticker so 
you can park anywhere on cam- 
pus." 

Sue Lorraine, credit manager, is 
kind of sad about the move. "I live 
in the country, now I work in the 
country, too, but at least there's no 
traffic problem out here," she 
reported. 

The suggestions for remodeling, 
made by John Martin, were "very 
good" according to Stein. Main- 
tenance was responsible for the 
actual removating. Likewise, their 
work is much appreciated. With 
showers taken out, a wall knocked 
down here, a petition erected 
there, the building, former home of 
Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity has 
taken on somehwat of a new look. 
With desks, filing cabinets, and 
mimeograph machines where 
there were once beds, bureaus and 
stereos, a returning fraternity 
member would be somewhat 
disoriented. 

Although the University Press is 

a business establishment residing 
in what was once living quarters, 
the place has by no means changed 
into a cold, impersonal office. The 
transformed reception room, 
complete with fireplace and wall to 
wall carpeting, is still in fact a 
living room when staff members 
gather to relax at the end of a busy 
day. The orange painted stairs 
adds a flair of individuality. The 
tiny kitchen still serving its age-old 
purpose is a haven for hungry 
helpers. The refrigerator, stocked 



Daley Offers Support 



CHICAGO — Mayor Richard J. 
Daley, whose delegates to the 
Democratic National Convention 
were unseated by insurgents, said 
today, "I will support the entire 
Democratic ticket." 

"I have stated my position many 
times previously," he said. "And I 
repeat it today. I am a 
Democrat... I will support every 
candidate on the Democratic 
tickets, federal state and local." 

His statement did not mention 



Sen. George McGovern, the 
Democratic candidate for 
president. Later, he said he had not 
been in contact with either 
McGovern or members of his staff. 

The mayor, who had been in 
seclusion for more than a week, 
made his comments at a news 
conference. 

Daley said he had sent 
McGovern a telegram today 
containing a copy of his statement 
of his support. 



TONIGHT 

In the BLUEWALL 

Wheeler's 
Egyptian Dog 

Featured Tuesday, Wednesday 
and Thursday Nights. 

9:00 p.m. til 1 :00 a.m. 



with such delicacies as frozen 
orange juice, coke, yogurt, 
cracked wheat bread, mayonnaise, 
and milk is sure to delight some 
inventive gourmet. 

The Press family is not yet 
completely setUed from the move. 
In due time the obstacle course of 
cartons in the reception roon will 
find a more orderly place of their 
own. And, according to a rush 
memo from the desk of Leone 
Stein, lights are on the way. 
PresenUy the staff is working in a 
monastic dimness. 

After the acquisition of a 
manuscript, it is passed on to two 
or three scholarly readers who are 
well versed on the manuscript's 
subject. 

The readers in turn study it out 
and report on whether or not they 
consider it worthy to be printed. 
One reader wrote: "If this 
manuscript should be published, 
I'll eat my hat." Stein relayed in 
her Concerning the Pleasures of 
Publishing. She also reasured that 
the reader has not had to eat his 
hat. 

If the manuscript survives this 
sifting, it then goes on to be con- 
sidered by a twelve member Press 
committee, who make the final 
decision. Keeping in mind that the 
Press operates at a deficit as it is, 
they can afford to print only what 
is suitable to their purpose and 
budget. If the manuscript makes it 
this far, the writer is in luck and it 
is just a matter of time before he 
will be in print. 

This "matter of time" phase is 
where the rest of the Press staff 
comes in. From this point on the 
manuscript is considered 
propoerty of the Press. The 
editors, armed with dictionaries, 
grammar lexions and Turabian's 
Manual for Writers of Term 
Papers Thesis and Disertations, 
begin their long probing journey 
through scores of type-written 
pages. Concerning this fine- 
toothed-comb treatment, Laurie 



Stroblas, the assistant editor says, 
"I read everything. If something 
strikes me as wrong, I'll go back. 
From the fruits of her effort, 
Stroblas sees the printed matter 
change from the manuscirpt to the 
long, first draft pages called 
galleys, toto page proofs and then 
to blues, page negatives named 
after their color. 

Working for her masters in 
English, Stroblas has "always 
been interested in books." Having 
recently completed a Radcliffe 
course in publishing, she is, "now 
on the other side. I make sure that 
what other people read is ac- 
curate." 

A very apropros Peanuts comic 
hands on her wall. Snoopy is seated 
at his typewriter. "Those years in 
Paris were to be among the finest 
of her life. Looking back, she one 
remarked, 'Those years in Paris 
were among the finest of my life.' 
That was what she said when she 
looked back upon those years in 
Paris where she spent some of the 
finest years of her life." 
Thoughtfully, Snoopy decides, "I 
think this is going to need a little 
editing." 

Part II of this informative look at 
the University Press will appear 
Thursday. Lisa Castillo will 
discuss the remainder of book 
publishing tasks, the financial 
"crunch", and the mood at the 
Press.) 

Kennedy Seeks 

BOSTON — Sen. Edward M. 
Kennedy of Massachusetts un- 
veiled Monday a proposal for 
legislation that would allow for 
federal control over Boston's 
numerous historical places, in- 
cluding Bunker Hill, the Old North 
Church and Faneuil Hall. 

The proposed bill also would 
allow the Secretary of the Interior 
to take over the North Square 
Historic Site, which includes the 
privately owned Paul Revere 
House. 




"But I only came in for an oil change! " 

No Automotive Rip Off's 

SPENCER'S Mobil STATION 

161 NO. PLEASANT ST., AMHERST (Next to P.O.) 
FREE ESTIMATES 
Open 24 hours — Road Service — 256-8426 



Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, JULY 18, 1972 



Review- Tanglewood 



Evening of Beethoven 



By ELLENI KOCH 

The oppressively hot, humid, and 
breezeless evening in Amherst last 
Friday was perfect for getting 
away to the higher elevations of the 
Berkshires, where Tanglewood is 
located, just a few miles off the Lee 
exit on the Massachusetts Turn- 
pike. The drive is a pleasant hour 
and a quarter long, but for an even 
more scenic way, I suggest trying 
Route 9. It's worth the extra fifteen 
minutes, not to mention an absence 
of tolls. 

This past weekend was devoted 
entirely to the works of Beethoven, 
starting with the usual 7 o'clock 
Weekend Prelude with Chamber 
Music. Predictably, by the time of 
the concert proper scheduled at 
nine, the gathering of music lovers 
grew immensely both in the shed (I 
looked but could not find one 
unoccupied seat) and on the lawn. 
One had to be an early bird for this 
popular weekend in order to stake 
out some territory with a blanket. 
This time I sat with friends on the 
lawn for the Prelude before going 



into the open-sided shed for the 
concert, and I must admit, 
listening to Beethoven in such an 
unrestricted atmosphere of ver- 
dure opened new vistas of pleasure 
to all the senses. After the fine 
Chamber Music, our simple picnic 
of sandwiches, fruit, cheese, and 
various refreshment became a 
festive event, reminiscent of 
paintings by Titian, though not as 
orgiastic, of course. But the senses 
were tuned, and everyone was on 
an incredibly natural high. 

The concert itself included two 
well-loved Beethoven symphonies, 
the Sixth and the Fifth, prformed 
in that order. William Steinberg, 
conductor, seemed bored with the 
Sixth, also known as the 
"Pastoral" Symphony due to the 
many allusions to life in the 
country. Steinberg was unexcited 
about it. I felt he did not share my 
enthusiasm at being there, 
resulting in a lack of communion. 
But the troops were terrific despite 
the blase attitude. The strings built 
up volume perfectly, from violins 



Games Area Opened 

Billiards and table tennis are available for all on the bottom floor 
of the Student Union Building, across from the closed Hatch. 

The games area is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 
p.m. Pool is available for 90* per hour, table tennis at 45* per hour. 
Both of these prices are pro-rated for lesser times. 

Located on the first level of the Campus Center is the Lost and 
Found Office. Situated to the left of the Down escalator, it remains 
open from 11:30-4:30, Monday through Friday. 

Spokesmen for the Lost and Found ask that if anything is found 
anywhere on campus, it should be turned in to them. Every effort is 
made to find the owner, they declare. Also, they added, if you lose 
anything, check with them immediately. 

Besides what has been turned in this summer, they say that they 
have many leftovers from the spring semester. 



Davis Troupe 
Here Thursday 



In Bowker Auditorium at 
8:00 p.m., on Thursday, July 
20, the Chuck Davis Dance 
Company will present a dance 
concert of original African 
dancing. The Company is well 
versed in classical, ethnic, jazz 
and modern form and will 
present a program including 
ethnic and modern dance. They 

have presented lecture 
demonstrations on the "Rhyth- 
ms of Africa", to thousands of 
elementary, junior and senior 
high school students, and in 
addition have offered master 
classes in modern and ethnic 
dance on the high school and 
college levels. Chuck Davis is 
the group's artistic director 
and choreographer. In addition 
to the concert, the Chuck Davis 
Dance Company will offer a 



master class to all holders of 
tickets for the evening event. 
This class will take place in the 
Women's Physical Education 
Building Dance Studio at 10:30 
a.m. 

Tickets for the dance concert 
are available in the Student 
Activities Office of the Campus 
Center. UMass summer 
students may receive tickets 
by presenting their I.D.'s. 
Tickets for non-students are 
$1.50. Tickets may also be 
obtained at the Bowker 
Auditorium box office one hour 
before the performance. It is 
suggested that those attending 
the concert park their cars in 
the Campus Center Parking 
Garage. For information and 
ticket reservations, contact the 
Student Activities Office by 
calling 545-2351. 



1 



to cellos to bass. The flute and solo 
bassoon especially were well 
played during the first three 
movements, but the percussionist 
had a field day during the fourth 
movement, the "Thunderstorm". 
Despite its sounding like a cliche 
due to the myriad times the 
movement has been bastardized in 
TV drama and cartoons, one could 
not help but become involved in the 
intensity of the imaginative 
sounds. 

After intermission the audience 
quickly hushed as the first notes of 
the famous Fifth were sounded. 
The very familiar TA-TA-TA-TAA 
motif was carried throughout the 
entire work in various forms most 
satisfyingly. Here, the power of 
Beethoven's Fifth Symphony 
surged through Steinberg as he 
conducted now with more zest and 
meaning. At first, the trumpets 
were a little shaky, but the per- 
formance recovered from initial 
nervousenss and the sounds of the 
trumpets became loud, clear, and 
captivating. 

The most involved part of the 
work, the struggle of the major key 
emerging from the clutches of the 
sinister minor key, is an intense 
study of tension within a 
systematically tight structure. The 
tension in this musical framework 
is held as long as possible by the 
bass in minor key, but finally the 
major key triumphs. I felt this 
triumph like a release of op- 
pressive burdens; truly a cathartic 
sensation, like being at 
Tanglewood. 

CEQ Films 

Tonight 

The Coalition for Environmental 
Quality will show two films on 
Tuesday, July 18, in Room 165 of 
the Campus Center. "Tragedy of 
the Commons" based on the 
scientific paper of the same name 
by Garrett Hardin will be shown at 
6:30 p.m. (color and sound). 
"Flooding River" by Dr. Lincoln 
Brower of Amherst College which 
was well received last week will be 
shown again at 7:15 p.m. because 
some people who missed it asked 
that it be shown again. Following 
the films, CEQ. hopes to start 
discussions on the issues raised by 
the films. 

In addition, further volunteers 
for the C.E.Q. office will be sought 
and more plans on what may be 
done during the rest of the summer 
will be discussed. 





TUESDAY, JULY 18. 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Five 



Ed Fowler and Martin Best (Photo by Steve Schmidt) 

Best, Flower; 
Great Concert 

Martin Best and Edward Flower brilliantly performed a 
lute and guitar concert last Thursday night in Memorial 
Hall. English, French, and Spanish folk and love songs 
highlighted the performance. 

Best's powerful voice and excellent finger work on the 
guitar pleased a capacity audience on the hot and muggy 
night. His songs brought to mind the pictures of rural 
England at times: agrarian societies, closely knit 
families, and men taking that giant leap into marriage, or 
at least love. 

Also included in the program were four songs which Best 
had written for Shakespearean plays. These were also well 
received by the attentive audience, which seemed to have 
fallen in love with most of Best's work. 

Not to be forgotten is Flowers. Very often, he looked as if 
he had more control over a lute and guitar than did Best. 
But altogether, Best and Flowers managed to complement 
each other so as to bring about a magnificent and en- 
joyable concert. 

Double Fright 



On Tuesday, July 18 at 7:00 p.m. 
the Summer Program will present 
two films in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. The first will be 
Alfred Hitchcock's classic "THE 
BIRDS", starring Rod Taylor and 
Suzanne Pleschette. The film 
makes you witness to a rare kind of 
horror as hundreds of people are 
victims of a mysterious attack by 
fierce birds. Hitchcock does an 
excellent job of conveying sheer 
terror to the viewer. 

Following a short intermission. 

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO 

BABY JANE?" will begin at 9 p.m. 

Betty Davis and Joan Crawford 



team up in a story of a has-been 
child star Baby Jane Hudson 
whose cuteness has grown 
grotesque in her later years. The 
film is filled with taut drama as 

tension builds to a shocking Hit 
chcock-like conclusion. 'Jane' was 
nominated for five Academy 
Awards and won one. This 132- 
minute flick was a top grossing box 
office picture of the year. 

Both films together promise a 
horrifyingly entertaining evening. 
They are shown at no charge but 
UMass summer students with IDs 
will be admitted first. 



ALFRED , 
HITCHC0CKS 



White Hoots of Peace (Photo hv Larry (iold) 




TECHNICOLOR* 

STARRING 

ROD TAYLOR 
JESSICA TANDY 



WHAT EVER 



HAPPENED To 

mimir 



7:00 P.M 



starring j an Crawford 
JULY 18, 1972 Bette Davis 

9:00 P.M. 

Cai..pus Center Auditorium 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 



Current Oldies Making Comeback 



CHICAGO — The airwaves over 
many American cities are fast 
filling with vintage rock 'n'roll, the 
clangorous, often nonsensical 
sounds that ushered an earlier 
generation of teen-agers into 
adulthood and their parents into 
seclusion. 

Commerical radio stations, 
prompted by the success of the 
stations that pioneered in playing 
so-called "golden oldies," are 
turning back their own tran- 
smitters to broadcast musical hits 
that led the pop charts when 
today's young marrieds wore flat 
tops and pleated plaid skirts to 
sock hops. 

Nowadays Billboard magazine's 
"hot 100" list of the most popular 
records contains about 20 "oldies." 
Rock revival concerts, featuring 
such singers of the 1950's as Danny 
and the Juniors, Bill Haley and the 
Comets, the Penguins and Freddy 
Cannon, regularly draw large, 
enthusiastic crowds. 

Even radio stations generally 
considered outposts of "good 
music" now feature a generous 
diet of songs popular 10 and 15 
years ago. On many stations even 
brand new songs are not called 
new. They are "future gold". 

So widespread is the return to 
older music on the nation's radio 
stations that the recording com- 
panies are eagerly signing new 
groups to remake old hits, while 
some old 79-cent records are 
selling for upward of $100. 

To some observers, it is part of 
the current nostalgia wave and a 
rejection of the part of the current 
nostalgia heavy social messages in 
many modern lyrics. Some see it 
as signaling another cyclical dry 
spell in popular musical creativity. 

To others, it is simply good 
business. It is no coincidence, for 
example, that the older popular 
music now aired so heavily appeals 
to an affluent, acquisitive audience 
aged 25 to 34, a population segment 
avidly coveted by advertisers. 

A Crier survey of radio stations 
in the Springfield-Amherst area 
revealed that oldies area a good 
business here, too. According to 
WACE (Chicopee) Station 
Manager Phil Zoppi, oldies from 
1955-1965 were programmed for 
afternoon and early evening 
listening since last June. He 
reported that this replaced a talk 
show which is still on for three 
hours each morning. 

"Gold sounds are doing 
well... How long it will stay is 
something else," he said in a 
telephone interview. He said that 
the trend now is away from all talk 
shows. His advertisers also sup- 
port him, he concluded, since the 
station's business has increased 
quite a bit. "Advertisers want to 
reach the young adult group," he 
said. 

WHYN (Springfield) spokesman 
Ken Capurso said that the oldies 
format there is as follows : 10 AM- 
2PM. oldies by request every other 
record; 8 PM-9PM all request, 
usually oldies; all other times, 4 
oldies per hour. Capruso said that 
this is an increase from four 
months ago due to listener 
requests. 

WSPR (Springfield) has been 
playing oldies at the rate of four 
per hour for almost three years 
now, according to Bud Clain, 
station spokesman. He added that 
there is currently a great "influx of 
oldie-type material," which in- 
fluences the actual amount of real 
oldies played. WSPR aims at the 
25-49 year old group with middle of 
the road music, said Clain. 

WMUA, the UMass student-run 
station, plays oldies under "free 
form" format depending upon 
whether or not the disc jockey 
wants to use them. According to an 
unidentified station spokesman, 
Bob Sawyer, who is on 8:30-11 
every Monday night, plays many 
oldies. 

According to a spokeswoman for 
WHMP, a Northampton station 
which plays middle of the road 
music for an adult oriented 




A Gaggle of current oldies. (Photo by Larry Gold) 



back to the simpler rock l n* roll 
and the softer, more romantic 
tunes reflect a general con- 
servative trend throughout the 
country, according to Dr. Jack 
Leedy, a New York psychiatrist. 

Mr. Campbell added: "Until 
recently the popular music was 
very complicated and serious with 
heavy social messages of woe and 
people getting stoned." 

"Today," he continued, "you 
want to hear something light, 
pleasant, bouncy, something to 
make you happy without much 
concentration. And that is a pretty 
good definition of an oldie." 

To Don Ovens, who directs 
Billboard magazine's musical hit 
lists, the trend to oldies means 
"songwriters are running out of 
ideas. Like everyone else they 
have creative spurts, then run dry 
for a while." 

Dick Clark, that 42-year-old 
perpetual teenage disc jockey who 
founded television's continuing 
"American Bandstand," agreed. 

"Right now is comparable to the 
period just before the Beatles 
invasion," said Mr. Clark, who is 
considering opening an oldies 
nightclub in New York City, 
"American popular music is in the 
doldrums now awaiting the arrival 
of the next musical messiah." 



audience, one oldie per half hour is 
played. 

"We don't have that many in our 
library," she said. Except for sport 
specials, she said, there is also a 
Monday night show with songs 
from the thirties and forties. 
WTTT, an Amherst station, 
reported that they always play big 
band oldies and show tunes. A 
spokesman there termed the 
format "square, but 'successful'." 

"I never saw anything like it 
before," said Tom Campbell, a 
disc jockey, whose station KLOK, 
jumped to among the top three in 
the San Francisco area after 
adopting an "oldies format." 

"I figured it could last a few 
months," he said, "but the oldies 
are still sweeping the country." 

In the pop music business "old" 
is, of course, a relative term which 
can apply to any time before last 
week. However, "golden oldie" 
generally means a song popular 
between the early 1950's and the 
later 1%0's. Some radio stations 
have always played an occasional 
former hit but more as a curiosity 
and never to the current extent. 

Typically the songs bemoan the 
miseries of teenage love. One 
current oldie, "Sealed With A 
Kiss," recounts the trauma in- 
volved when two young lovers 
separate for their school's summer 
vacation. 

Ten years ago that song as 
performed by Bobby Vinton was 
No. 3 on the Billboard popularity 
list. Last week, recorded by Bryan 
Hyland, it was up to No. 32. 

Dick Liberatore, whose "Big 
Beat Dance Party" is carried on 
Cleveland's WZAK, says, "My 
audience wants to forget its 
problems and return or at least 
recall those happy high school 
times-the prom, no wars, no riots, 
no protests, the convertibles at the 
drive-in." 

The old music is attracting more 
listeners to many stations, ac- 
cording to Pulse, a radio rating 
service. In Boston, WCAS 
broadcast nothing but oldies and 
became the area's most popular 
station last year. 

Before Philadelphia's WCAU 
switched to oldies its audience was 
about 58,000. Two weeks after the 
change it was 250,000. Now it's 
nearly 500,000. 

On the West Coast, KWIZ in 
Santa Ana, KNEW in Oakland, and 
LUUU in Seattle boosted ratins 
with oldies. 

On the West Coast, KWIZ in 
Santa Ana, KNEW in Oakland and 
KUUU in Seattle boosted ratings 
with oldies. 

In Pittsburgh, WIXZ, the second 
ranked station, plays 10 oldies an 



hour while WJAS ("Olde Golde") 
switched to old hits April 1. Even 
WWSW, traditionally a "good 
music" station, throws in three 
oldies an hour now, as do a number 
of stations previously devoted to 
playing only current rock hits. 

In New York City, WPIX has a 
daily feature, "Old Gold 
Recycled," and 12 hours of oldies 
on weekends. WNBC had a four- 
day oldies program on the July 4 
weekend. 

But the trend is more than to just 
dusting off old records. WIND 
here, which calls its format "No. 1 
Music," switched to playing 
mostly older hits last July after 
much research led to a precise 
formula that governs selection of 
records from 2,000 on tape. 

Songs are balanced in tempo, 
style and year so, as Robert 
Moomey, program manager, put 
it, "If one song doesn't ring a bell, 
then the next one will." Each hour 
WIND broadcasts four records 
each from the fifties, early sixties 
and late sixties plus two current or 
recent hits. 

"We figured," added Mr. 
Moomey, "that if you liked the 
song in 1958, you'll like it now and 
so will today's 18-year-old. 

Apparently he was right. A year 
ago the station's listeners totaled 
596,000. Now they are approaching 
800,000, and the station's ad- 
vertising time is sold out weeks in 
advance. 

Another advantage of the format 
is that the station can conceivably 
play the past hits for years, con- 
stantly updating them to appeal to 
the latest crop of former teen- 
agers. 

"This music," said Dick 
Williamson, a WIND disc jockey, 
"is a great memory jogger. All of a 
sudden the words or an incident 
come flooding back." 

Although the songs may not have 
changed much, their presentation 
has. Mr. Campbell, the San 
Francisco area disc jobkey who at 
31 has seen his annual earnings 
double to $80,000 since he started 
playing oldies, said: "In the old 
days we never played records, we 
spun platters. We didn't give you 
the time, we announced the time 
chime at the song bong is three 
ticks past the hour." 

The movement away from the 
screaming of the disc jockeys and 
the more recent popular music 




The place that made Amherst 
famous. 

DRAKE RESTAURANT 

Village Inn 

RATHSKELLER 

85 AMITY 253-2548 

Open 11 a.m. — 2 a.m. 



Nostalgic jukebox awaits attention. (Photo by Larry Gold) 




& sale 01 








lor collectors 

CHAGALL, BASKIN, ROUAUIT 
DAUMIER. MATISSE. PICASSO 
AND MANY OTHERS. 



il /1 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Campus Center 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1», 1*72 

11 AM til 7 PM 



PURCHASES MAT IE CHANGED 



Sponsored by: 
UMASS Summer 
PROGRAM 
COMMITTEE 



ARRANGED Br 



F-f I FERDINAND ROTEN GALLERIES 



RU'iMORI Mfl 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, JULY 18, 1972 




Team Standings 



MEN'S SOFTBALL STANDINGS AS OF JULY 12, 1972 



TUESDAY, JULY 18, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 



A cross country race lor males and females will be held on Wednesday, July ltth at 7:00 p.m. The 
races will begin at the stadium road. All participants may sign up at the Intramurals Office-Boyden #215 
or at the site of the race just prior to the meet. Two separate races will be run, one for men (1.7 miles) 
and one for women (1.0 miles). The races are open to summer students, faculty and staff . _ 




Schedules Ready 



All individuals participating in 
any intramural activities are 
requested to pick up competition 
schedules in the Intramural Office, 
215 Boy den. It is especially im- 
portant that those signed up for 



tennis, badminton, paddleball, 
squash, and handball pick up 
schedules as they are the only 
means through which opponents 
can be contacted for matches. 




You get results with our Classifieds 



Crier Classifieds 



INSERTION ORDER 



50° each insertion 



Client 



DATES TO RUN 



Headline 



ADVERTISING COPY 















































































































1 


































































































































— ^— 










1 



Please Insert one -.haracter, space, or punctuation mark per box. 



WESTERN LEAGUE 




* LEAGUE A 




Quiver 


2-0 


Phi Sigma Delta 


2-0 


Phi Sigma Delta 


1-0 


Polymers 


1-1 


English Dept. 


1-1 


Upward Bound 


1-1 


Education 


0-1 


Cyborgs 


0-2 


Hustlers 


0-2 


CENTRAL LEAGUE 




NATIONAL LEAGUE 




Piglets 


2-0 


Gunners 


1-0 


Civil Engineering 


1-0 


Rickies 


1-0 


Dry Heaves 


1-0 


Ringers 


1-1 


MAE 


0-2 


Vets 


1-1 


Organized Whodunits 


0-2 


Yo-Yo's 


0-2 






VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS AS OF JULY 13, 1972 




AMERICAN LEAGUE 




LEAGUE B 




Behavior men 


2-0 


APK 


2-0 


Brett Bombers 


1-1 


Pipefitters 


2-0 


Riley's Raiders 


1-1 


Bretts Best 


0-2 


No Names 


0-1 


Bretts Bums 


0-2 


Pipefitters 


0-1 







CHUCK DAVIS 

Dance Company 

Thursday, July 20 

Dance Concert 8 p.m. 
Bowher Auditorium, 

Master Class 10:30 a.m. 
WOPE Studio 

(For Concert Ticket Holders) 

Tickets available at Student Activities Office 

Level One, Campus Center 

UMass Summer Students — Free with ID 

Others — $1.50 



CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED 



FOR SALE 



PERSONAL 



1964 Chevrolet Impala Con- 
vertible, good condition, contact 
Larry at 549-6676 or leave 
message at Crier office. 

Nikon F Hard Leather case. 
Like New $15. Call Gib at 549- 
6087. 

7/21 

22" Black &, White TV $45., 21" 
Color TV $150. TELEVISION 
CENTER, 55 North Pleasant St. 
Amherst, 2nd Floor, #253-5100. 

8/15 

Torino, (Ford) '68, GT, spt. 
roof. V8, 3 spd stand., nev» 
exhaust, brakes, valve job, snow 
tires w/wheels, excel, cond., 
orig. owner, $1375. Call 549-0525 
(after 6 p.m.) 

7/18 

Thunderbird, (Ford) '67, 
Landau, 4-dr. AT/PS/PB, power 
windows, new exhaust, many 
other features. Excel, cond. 
$1250. Call 545 3903(Holyoke) 

1969 Ford Fairlane, 2-dr. hard- 
top, V-8 automatic, power 
steering, low mileage, excellent 
condition. $1,450. Call 253-5806. 

7/18 



HELP WANTED 

Psych study female cycle 
woman, age 20 - 30, non-pill user, 
$2/hr., approx 10 hr., over 
period 2 mos. Call Mon. - Fri. 8 - 
12 542-2354. 

7/20 



FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207-T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

8/15 

Karin Congratulations on new 
license and car. Best wishes. - 
The Sensuous Ones. 

7/18 



FOR RENT 



Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $185/M incl utilities. Call 
Resident AAgr 665-4239, if no 
answer 1 786 0500. 

8/15 



GRAD student seeks to share 2 
bedroom Clnial Vlg. apt. now 
through school yr. 253-2094. Also 
wish to buy used TV and stereo. 

7/20 

NOTICES 

Christians — prayer meeting 
Mon — Fri., 12:30 — 1:00 p.m. 
177 CC. Everyone welcome. 

7/20 

You are most welcomed to come 
every Tuesday at 7 p.m. for an 
informal gathering of The 
Christian Science College 
Organization. Hear how Truth 
and Love unfold good for all. 
Campus Center 809. 

8/15 

Tues. July 18-Bahai Fireside- 
"Spiritual Communication"-a 
talk by Nat Rutstein (#117 
University Apts. -8 p.m.) 
Everyone welcome. 



CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED 



Music Superbowl To Aid Belchertown School 



Five leading senior drum and 
bugle corps from the U.S. and 
Canada will compete at the UMass 
Alumni Stadium, Saturday evening 
Aug. 19, in a Superbowl of Music to 
benefit Belchertown State School 
residents. 

The student government of 
Mackimmie House dormitory at 
UMass recently voted to donate 
some of the house funds to the 
Super Bowl of Music, by pur- 
chasing a $100 block of tickets and 
presenting these to a worthy group 
of young people who would also 
benefit by attending this function. 

Stephen Demastrie of Adams 
and Bruce Rose of New Bedford, 
who is a member of the Con- 
necticut Hurricanes Drum and 
Bugle Corps, followed through on 
the decision of the house govern- 
ment by presenting the tickets to 
members of the Springfield Blue 
Hawks. The 30 member unit, 
ranging in age from nine to 16 
years, is managed by E. James 
Wheeler. They have been awarded 



Astro-Cast 

Scorpio feels intensely. There seldom is 
anything lukewarm or halfway where 
natives of this zodiacal sign are con 
cerned Scorpio holds lively discussions 
with Capricorn, can have love affair with 
Pisces, often marries Taurus, enjoys 
dining with Aauarius. has ambitions 
fulfilled with Leo and enters secret 
agreements w <n Libra Doctors who are 
of special aid to Scorpio are born under 
Aries. Where hopes and wishes enter 
picture, Scorpio oravitates to Virgo. More 
Presidents of the United Statei were born 
under Scorpio than under any other 

zodiacal sign. 

• ** 

ARIES (March 21 April 19) Spotlight 
is on legacies, leases, special accounts, 
review of financial status. Mate, partner 
has money question Frank discussion 
nowhelpscleartheair. Doyour part insist 
tha' others live up to their obligations 

TAURUS (April 21 May 20): New 
methods are required You gain more 
public attention. Outmoded procedures 
will not suffice. Accent >s on contract, 
joint effor's, marriage You get.chance to 
display original concepts Leo is involved 

GEMINI (May 71 June 20): Avoid 
brooding Conditions are due to improve. 
Applies especially in areas of em 
ployment. healt'., relationships with 
those who share interests Maintain 
steady pace. Keep recent resolutions. 
Deal with Aquarius. 

CANCER (June 21 July 22): Stress 
ability to use alternative plans. You need 
not feel confined Show that you are 
willing to exchange ideas Socialize. 
Perceive potential. Bring forth creative 
resources. Sagittarius child needs at 
tent ion. 

LEO (July 23 Aug 22): Accent is on 
practical issues, including home repairs. 
Solidify plans. Check values. Get 
property appraisal. Aquarius and Scorpio 
are likely to be in picture. Focus on basic 
objectives Study fine print 

VIRGO (Aug 23 Sept 22) Accent on 
activity, change, dealings with neighbors 
and relatives. Develop ideas. Ask 
questions answers are obtainable Give 
full play to intellectual curiosity Stress, 
humor, versatility. 

LIBRA (Sept 23 Oct 22) Guard 
valuables Search for genuine bargain 
You can profitably add to possessions 
Improve home surroundings. Treat 
yourself to luxury items You have right 
to be comfortable Music now serves as 
tonic. 

SCORPIO (Oct 23 Nov. 21): Take lead. 
Stress personality, individuality Pisces 
can play key role Wear bright colors 
Express original ideas. Take initiative. 
Be independent, forthright. Personal 
magnetism attracts opposite sex. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 Dec. 21): 
What occurs is meaningful. Means don't 
play games. Stakes are high and for 
keeps Know it and act accordingly. Some 
areas that were secret now are revealed. 
Skeletons could rattle. Do some soul 
searchinq 

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 Jan. 19) Wishes 
are fulfilled if /o>i get rid of outmoded 
concepts Look »o future. Stop brooding 
about what "might have been" Aries can 
set example In professional area, add to 
advertismq budget 

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 Feb 18): Study 

.ipncorn messaqi' Find out where you 
wdnt to go and why Then do something 
about it. Be awan sin- ItiVt Ttv t 
room for you at lop Pi.sh forth idias 
Articulate aspira'.onv 

PISCES (Feb 19 Marrh 70) Good 
lunar aspect now coincides with lourneys, 
higher education, alignment of ambitions 
with reality. Sense of maturity is 
heightened. Inner feelings can serve as 
reliable guide. Be true to yourself. 

IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY you 
have the ability to communicate, to reach 
large segment of public By September, 
you will be on more solid ground em 
tionaiiy and financially. If single, 
marriage is on horizon You are 
preparing to get into business for your 
self 

(To find out who's lucky for you in 
money and love, order Sydney Omarr's 
booklet, "Secret Mints for Men and 
Women." Send birthdate and 75 cents to 
Omarr Astrology Secrets, (name of your 
paper) Box 3240. Grand Central Station, 
New York. N Y 10017 I 

'"i^yr • 



the Army and Air National Guard 
Plaque, NEIPA Grand Nationale 
Class C 1972 Championship, and 
are official representatives of the 
Eastern States Exposition. During 
the summer they also perform for 
parades and exhibitions as a bell 
and drum corps. 

The Super Bowl is sponsored by 
the Belchertown School Friends 
Association, a group dedicated to 
the improvement of the quality of 
the lives of the mentally retarded 
residents at Belchertown. 

Competing will be the New York 
City Skyliners, Drum Corps 
Associates national champions; 
Les Diplomates of Quebec City; 
the Renegades of Everett; the 
Ontario Commanders, Canadian 



national champions; and the 
Sunrisers of Hempstead, L.I. The 
program will begin at 7:30 p.m. 

The nationally-famed Drum and 
Bugle Corps and Silent Drill Team 
of the U.S. Marine Corps will give a 
special exhibition; there will also 
be a special exhibition by the St. 
George Olympians Junior Drum 
and Bugle Corps of Springfield and 
massed colors by American Legion 
and Veterans of Foreign Wars 
color guards from several posts. 
The National Eagles Junior Drum 
Corps of Easthampton will be non- 
competing hosts for the superbowl. 

The UMass has donated the use 
of the 20,000-seat Alumni Stadium 
for the event and many members 
of the University community are 



donating their services. The 
superbowl committee is headed by 
Bishop Christopher J. Weldon of 
Springfield and Judge Samuel 
Blassberg of Greenfield as 
honorary chairmen. Co-chairmen 
are Dr. Benjamin Ricci, president 
of the Belchertown State School 
Friends Association, and Dr. 
William Venman, UMass director 



of Continuing Education. 

Tickets are priced from $2 to $4, 
with all proceeds after expenses 
going to a recreation program fund 
for Belchertown residents. Ad- 
vance reservations may be made 
with Joe Sexton, 229 Whitmore, 
UMass, Amherst, 01002. In case of 
rain Aug. 19, the program will be 
held the following day at 1 : 30 p. m 



Erwin Outlines Goals 
For Rural Development 



Crossword Puzzle 



Answer to Last Issue's Puzzle 



"People building, community 
facilities, environmental im- 
provement and economic 
development" are the four goals of 
the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture rural development 
program, according to William 
Erwin, USDA deputy un- 
dersecretary for rural develop- 
ment. 

The USDA official outlined the 
goals at a recent meeting with 
members of the Massachusetts 
Rural Development Committee at 
UMass. J. Richard Beattie, 
associate director of the 
Cooperative Extension Service, is 
chairman of the committee. 

Mr. Erwin was briefed by 
representatives of various agen- 
cies involved with rural 
development at UMass and spoke 
with Chancellor Randolph W. 
Bromery and Dean Arless A. 
Spielman of the College of Food 
and Natural Resources. 

He then went to LaFleur Airport 
and boarded a plane for a low- 
altitude flight over western 



Massachusetts to observe projects 
associated with rural develop- 
ment. 

Mr. Erwin is an Indiana farmer 
who has served in appointive posts 
under three presidents. He 
previously served on President 
Nixon's Task Force on Rural 
Development, on President 
Johnson s Committee on Com- 
munity Relations and on President 
Eisenhower's Committee on 
Programs and Progress. 



DOUBLE FEATURE 

Dracula 

With Bela Lugosi 

Directed by Tod Browning 

And 

Kiss of the Vampire 

in Color 
Friday, July 21 8:30 p.m. 

Amherst 
Folklore Center 



Behind the Lord Jeff 



ACROSS 

1 Cook in 

oven 
6 Wise men 

11 Idle 
chatter 

12 Odors 

14 Symbol for 
silver 

15 Handled 

17 Pronoun 

18 Decay 

20 Journeys 
forth 

21 Resort 

22 Twist 

24 River in 
Wales 

25 Serene 

26 Guides 
28 Acute 

nervousness 

30 A month 

31 Inlet 

32 Innate 

35 Dugout for 
troops 

38 Lubricates 

39 Female 
sheep 

41 Portico 

42 Golf 
mound 

43 Iroquoian 
Indians 

45 Mournful 

46 Alternating 
current (abbr.) 

47 Restrained 

49 Symbol for 
tellurium 

50 Following 
first 

52 Wipes out 

54 Bnstles 

55 Married 
again 

DOWN 



2 


Old 




Testament 




(abbr.) 


3 


Unit of 




Siamese 




currency 


4 


Slave 


5 


Walks on 


6 


Glossy fabric 


7 


War god 


8 


Deity 


9 


Printer's 




measure 


10 


Specimen 


11 


Separates 


13 


Junctures 


16 


Exist 


19 


Shudder 


21 


Men of 




learning 


23 Approaches 


25 


Sobs 


27 


Grain 


29 


Be 




mistaken 


32 


Specks 



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23 Female 
relatives 

34 Flout 

35 Seesaw 

36 Covered with 
thin film 

37 Underworld 
40 Emerge 

victorious 



43 Sicilian 
volcano 

44 Withered 

47 Drunkard 

48 Jackdaw 
51 Symbol for 

cerium 

53 Compass 

point 




Dlstr. by United Feature Syndicate, Inc. 




Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



MOVIES 

UMass Summer Film Programme, 
Campus Center Auditorium 

"The Birds" 7 p.m.; "Whatever 
Happened to Baby Jane" 9 p.m. 
Amherst Folklore Center, Spring 
Street 

"Kiss of the Vampire" 8:30 p.m., 
Fri., July 21 

July 20: 9:00 "Cities of the Poor-Part 
I"; 10:15 p.m. "Cities of the Poor 
Part II"; 11:30 p.m. "How Things 
Get Done". Campus Center Room 
162, admission free. 
July 21: 9:00 "Troubled Cities"; 
10:15 p.m. "Cities-The Rise of New 
Towns", 11:30p.m. "Private Dream 
Public Nightmare", Campus Center 
Room 162, admission free. 
C.E.Q. presents "Tragedy of tne 
Commons", 6:30 p.m. ,id "Flooding 
River", 7:15 p.m. July 18 in Room 165 
of the Campus Center. 
The Academy — 

"The French Connection" 9:00 

"Walkabout" 7:15 
Calvin — 

"Shaft's Big Score" 7 & 9, 1:30 
Matinee 
Amherst Cinema— 

"Shaft's Big Score" 7 & 9 
Campus Cinema 1— 

"Play It Again Sam" 78.9 
Campus Cinema 2 — 

"Clockwork Orange" 7 ft 9: 15 
Campus Cinema 3 — 

"Eroticon" 7 & 9 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 1 — 

"McCabe & Mrs. Miller" 7:00 

"Cool Hand Luke" 9:30 Matinee 
1:45 
Jerry Lewis Cinema 2 — 

"Joe" 7:15-9: 15, Matinee 2:00 
Showcase— 

"Duck Your Sucker" 2:00-7:30-9:50 
Showcase — 

"The War Between Men 8. Women" 
2.00-7:30-9:40 
Showcase — 

"Napoleon & Samantha" 2:00-7:30- 
9:20 
Showcase — 

"Portnoy's Complaint" 2:00i7:30- 
9:40 
Showcase — 

"The Godfather" 2:00-8:00 
Majestic — 

"Monda Erotica" & "The Wild- 
cats" 
Red Rock — 

"Cowboys" & "The Omega Man" 
Deerfield — 

"Red Sun" & "Le Mans" 
Hadley Drive-In — 

"The French Connection", "The 
Boston Strangler", showtime 8:30 
LECTURE 
July 18: "Glimpses of the Early New 
England Interior, 1760 1850"; White 
Church Community Center, Deer 
field, Mass., 8 p.m 

PLA i b ANDMUSICALS 
Arena Civic Theatre, Greenfield 
(phone 773 7991) 

"Happy Birthday Wanda June" 
July 20, 21, 27, 29 

Mount Holyoke College, South 
Hadley (phone 538 2406) 

"Any Wednesday" July 18-22. 
Curtain time 8:30. 



Highlights 



Storrowton Musical Theatre West 
Springfield (phone 732-1105) 

"This Was Burlesque" runs the 
week of July 17 

Williamstown Summer Theatre, 
Williamstown (phone 458 8146) 

"Arturo Ui" July 18 22 
Music Theatre Workshop, 170 Elm 
Street, Holyoke (phone 788-0258) 

"Annie Get Your Gun" July 19-22. 
Curtain time 8 p.m. 

Williston-Northampton School, 
Easthampton (phone 527 1520) 

"The Emperor's New Clothes" 
July 19, 21, 22, "The Prime of Miss 
Jean Brodie", July 19, 20, 21, 22. 

OUT-OF-STATE 
NEW YORK 
New York City 

NY Shakespeare Festival, Central 
Park, July 20 Aug. 5: Ti Jean and His 
Brothers, a new play written by 
Derek Walcott. 

Hunter Summer Repertory 
Theater, Hunter College, Brecht on 
Brecht, July 20 22. 
Albany 

State University Summer Theatre, 
"Oh, What A Lovely War" July 19 22. 

Lake George Village, Towers Hall 
Playhouse, July 19-22, "Last of the 
Red Hot Lovers" 
CONNECTICUT 
Ivoryton 

"Dial M for Murder" with Joan 
Fontaine, July 17-22. 
Southbury 

"Play It Again, Sam", July 18 22 
Storrs 

"How to Succeed in Business", July 
1822. 
Stratford 

The American Shakespeare 
Festival Theater, "Anthony and 
Cleopatra", July 18, 22; "Julius 
Caesar", July 19, 20; "Major Bar- 
bara", July 21. 
RHODE ISLAND 
Providence 

Brown University Summer 
Theater in Faunce House Arena 
Theater, "Dial M for Murder", July 
1923 
Warwick 

Musical Theater, "Sandler and 
Young", Pat Cooper, July 17-23. 

DANCE 
UMass Summer Dance Program 

The Chuck Davis Dance Co., 
Bowker Aud., 8 p.m. July 20 
Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, 
Becket (phone243 0745) 

First Chamber Dance Co.: Frank 
Bays, Charles Bennet, Dara DeLuis, 
Janice Gronab, Flemming Halby, 
Carolyn Muchmor, Marjorie 
Mussman, Gerard Sibbritt July 18 
22 

MUSIC 
Tanglewood, Lenox (phone 637 1600) 

July 21: 7 p.m. Weekend Prelude, 
Earl Wild conducts; 9 p.m. Bruno 
Maderna conducts; 
Gabriel/Maderna : Motet Stravin- 
sky: Concerto for piano and winds; 
Earl Wild conducts; Brahms: 
Symphony No. 1 



10:30 a.m. Open 
8:30 p.m. Leonard 
conducts: Brahms 
No. 4 and 



FTC Stops Deceptive 
Practices in Springfield 



The Federal Trade Commission 
announced provisional acceptance 
of a consent order prohibiting a 
Springfield, Mass., home im- 
provement firm from making 
deceptive pricing, guarantee and 
free claims, using other deceptive 
or unfair saUs practices, and 
violating the Truth in Lending Act. 

The agree-to-order cites Colonial 
Engineering Corp., 78 Verge St., 
and an official, Stanley D. Saxby. 

Typical allegations in the 
complaint are that: 

•Colonial's siding materials and 
installations are not offered at 
reduced prices with resultant 
savings to purchasers, as claimed. 
In reality, it has no regular price 
but the amount charged varies 
from customer to customer 
depending on the prospect's 
resistance. 

• The firm misrepresented that 
its siding materials and in- 
stallations are unconditionally 
guaranteed for life and that pur- 
chasers will save up to 50 percent 
on their heating fuel expenses. 

• The cost of items — doors, 
railing : * - nurw; I My £ 
fret U Jf ' i i ItHfv *n 



the piv 



•rr l. 



• Through high pressure sales 
tactics customers were induced 
into signing blank or incomplete 
contracts. 

• Colonial omitted an in- 
stallment contracts credit in- 
formation required by the Truth in 
Lending Act. 

• In some instances it did not 
give credit customers whose 
homes were taken as security the 
required notice that they have 
three days to rescind the tran- 
saction. 

The agreement forbids these and 
other challenged practices, 
provides for a three-day cooling -of f 
period on all sales arising out of 
door-to-door solicitations, and 
preserves credit purchasers' 
rights if their notes are turned over 
to third parties. 

The agreed-to order is for set- 
tlement purposes only and does not 
constitute an admission by 
respondents that they have 
violated the law. When issued by 
the Commission on a final basis, a 
consent order carries the force of 
law with respect to future actions. 
A 'io! tion of such an order may 

- 'If ill t civil penalty up to $5,000 
• - 3 imp<^sed upon a 

i ' " tiri . - 



July 22: 
Rehearsal; 
Bernstein 

Program; Symphony 
Symphony No. 2 

July 23: Karel Ancerl conducts; 
Gluck: Overture to "Iphigeniath in 
Aulis'Wejvanovsky: Sonata a7 and 
Sonata alO/Schumann: Piano 
Concerto; Alicia DeLarrocha con- 
ducts Dvorak: Symphony No. 8 
Music at Stratford, Stratford, Conn. 
(Avon Theatre) 

July 23: 2 p.m. Rudolf Firkusny, 
pianist, Schubert/Sonata in A minor. 
Opus 143, Schumann/ 
Davidsbundlertanze, Opus 6, 
Debussy /Three Etudes, 
Smetana/The Shepherdress, Mac 
beth and the Witches 

TV HIGHLIGHTS 

Tuesday 

7:30 p.m. BASEBALL (4) Angels 
vs. Red Sox. 

8:30 p.m. MOVIE: "The House that 
Wouldn't Die" (5, 8, 40) - Barbara 
Stanwyck stars in a TV movie about a 
haunted house. 

8:30 p.m. EVENING AT POPS (24, 
57) Features Roberta Flack 

9:30 p.m. JEAN SHEPARD'S 
AMERICA (57) Shepard relates his 
World War II experiences on a troop 
train and KP duty. 

9:30 p.m. GOOD VIBRATIONS 
FROM LONDON (20, 22, 30) Concert 
at London's Crystal Palace Bowl 
featuring Melanie, Sha Na Na, Richie 
Havens, Beach Boys and Joe Cocker 
Wednesday 

9:00 a.m. PAUL BENZAQUIN (7) - 
Linda Jenness, Socialist Workers 
Party Candidate for President is 
interviewed. 

7:30 p.m. PIONEER VALLEY, 
U.S.A. (40) Special, A LOOK AT 
THE POINTS OF INTEREST IN 
THIS AREA. 

8:00 p.m. DAVID STEINBERG (3, 
7, 10) - Primer of a new humor show 
on American life. 

8:00 p.m. A PUBLIC AF- 
FAIR/ELECTION '72 (24, 57) A look 
at party alignments. 

8:30 p.m. MOVIE: "Potemkin" (24, 
57) - Sergei Eisenstein's classical 
film on the abortive 1905 Russian 
Revolution. Well worth the 90 
minutes. 

11:30 p.m. MOVIE: "Frankenstein 

Must Be Destroyed" (3, 7) 

Humorous Thriller dealing with 

brain transplants. Filmed in Mid 

dlesex House. 



TUESDAY, JULY 18, 1972 

Bicyclists Beware 

In 1960, 3.7 million bikes were which require reflectorized pedals, 
sold in the United States. Last front and back reflectors, gear 
year, that figure had risen to 8.9 shifts that are mounted at the 
million, and there are forecasts of extreme forward part of the top 
11 million bike sales this year. horizontal crossbar, and front and 
On the negative side, the rear wheels of the same diameter. 
National Safety Council tallied 850 Based on recommendations 
bike deaths in traffic accidents and made in a 1972 staff report, the 
40,000 injuries last year, compared F.D.A. standards are likely to 
with 500 deaths and 27,000 injuries require these features plus ad- 
in 1961. Moreover, the Department ditional side reflectors, non-slip 
of Health, Education and Welfare pedals, seat posts that cannot be 
estimates that Americans suffer raised so high they interfere with 
one million injuries each year in all the rider's control, and possible 
bicycle-related accidents. elimination of the front-wheel 

F.D.A. officials say many caliper brake on some bikes (a 
children would be spared bike sudden stop with such a brake can 
injuries if their parents took the send the rider flying toward the 
time to teach common sense rules handlebars), 
of the road. Safety Tips 

Nevertheless, poorly designed tin general, bicyclists, like 
and manufactured bikes, safety motorists, should always signal 
experts say, are responsible for before turning, always turn from 
many injuries. While most are not the proper lane, obey all traffic 
serious, recurring ones are, in- signals and lights. They should ride 
eluding genital injuries inflicted by as close to the right-hand edge of 
gear shift levers that protrude the road as practical, 
from the horizontal crossbar. »Don't carry a second 

Right now, the only standards in passenger on the handlebars, 
existenceare voluntary ones, known #Don't carry anything that 
as "BMA/6", set up this year by would prevent at least one hand 
the Bicycle Institute of America, a from being on the handlebars at all 
trade association representing all times. 

major American makers except #Have good strong night 
Schwinn. (Schwinn says its lights— a headlamp visible for 300 
standards are "far superior" to feet in front and a reflector visible 
BMA/6 but will not disclose what for 300 feet to the rear, 
they are.) •Keep brakes in good con- 

According to a spokesman for dition— capable of causing at least 
the institute, all of the American one wheel to skid on dry, level 
makes now in the stores probably pavement, 
comply with the present standards, 

Tips on Bicycle Buying 

The following tips on buying a safe bicycle have been culled from 
Federal and industry reports: 

WHAT TO LOOK FOR: Front, back and side reflectors, plus reflec- 
torized wheels; nonskid pedals; coaster brakes or caliper brakes a child 
can reach and squeeze easily; gear shift either on the handlebar or far 
forward on the horizontal bar; a horn and, if the child rides at night a 
front light, and a seat post that cannot be pulled so high or pushed down so 
low that it hinders child's control of the bike. 

WHAT TO AVOID: A bike too big for the child (like shoes, bicycles 
should be bought to fit, not to grow into; on a first bike, the child should be 
able to jump off without hurting himself on the crossbar) a "sissy barr" 
protruding behind the seat; a front wheel smaller than the back wheel 
sharp edges, even those under the rubber grips on the handlebars no 
brakes, and a "banana" seat, unless the child agrees not to ride double 



Laird Accuses McGovern 
of Compromise 

WASHINGTON - Secretary of workhorse plane in Vietnam-which 
Defense Melvin R. Laird suggested is also built by McDonnell-Douglas 
today the Democratic presidential <n St. Louis. 



Letters 



nominee, George McGovern, ha? 
agreed to support the Air Force's 
new F15 jet fighter plane as the 
price for getting Sen. Thomas 
Eagleton as his running mate. 

Eagleton is from Missouri where 
the F15 is being built by Mc- 
Donnell-Douglas Corp. of St. Louis. 
As president, McGovern has said 
he would scrap the F15 in favor of 
development of a less costly 
lightweight fighter. 

McGovern's press secretary, 
Richard Dougherty, denied the 
charge. Dougherty, in Rapid City, 
S.D., where McGovern arrived this 
afternoon en route to a vacation in 
the Black Hills, said Laird's 
statement was unworthy of 
comment. 

At a Pentagon news conference, 
Laird said: "I am led to believe, 
however, that perhaps the vice- 
presidential candidate in part of* 
his agreement to run was able to get 
a modification of that position." 

The Defense secretary did not say 
where he got this information or on 
what it was based. 

Laird noted that the F15 is the 
first weapons system developed 
under new contracting procedures 
instituted during his ad- 
ministration for which he claimed 
"complete and total responsibility 
as secretary of Defense." 

"St. Louis is known as Phan 
tomtown, U.S.A., and it will be 
known as Eagleton, ILS.A." Laird 
quipped with a play on words and 
Eagleton's name. The F15, dubbed 
the Eagle by the Air Force at its 
rollout last month, is intended to 
replace the F4 Phantom- 



Yes, do send in your comments 
on campus life, international af- 
fairs, national emergencies, etc. 
All we demand is that all letters to- 
he-editor be typed on a sixty-space 
ine, one side of each page, double- 
spaced. 



Religion 

Married Men to Service as Deacons 

The Archdiocese of Boston has taken the first step toward formation of 
a training program to prepare married men fo r sermons. 

Boston joins Detroit, Washington, Baltimore and other cities where 
deacons will be used extensively in the future. 

A chancery spokesman said, however, that it may be some time before 
the program is implemented locally. 

The ordination of a new corps of Catholic clergymen, most of them 
married, represents a significant and historic step in the life of the 
church. 

For more than 13 centuries, the diaconate has been a stage of or- 
dination prior to entry into the full priesthood. But the new deacons are 
being ordained to the rank on a permanent basis, just as they were during 
the early centuries of Christianity. 

Deacons are authorized to baptize, preach, distribute communion, 
officiate at weddings and funerals, conduct religious devotions and 
perform other pastoral duties. Unlike priests, however, they are not 
empowered to celebrate Mass or to hear confessions. 

"While they can perform various liturgical functions, much of their 
work is expected to be supplemental," said Fr. William Philbin, director 
of the Secretariat of the US Bishops' Committee on the Permanent 
D ; aconate. 

Fr. Philbin said most married deacons will be assigned to duty in 
hospitals, chaplaincies and other service programs. 

Conceivably, in areas where priests are in acutely short supply, a 
deacon might even be placed in charge of a small parish. In most cases, 
however, men will serve as deacons on a part-time basis, since most of 
them will have to support themselves through regular secular jobs. 

Some full-time assignments have been made, however, and more are 
contemplated, depending on the needs of the church, Fr. Philbin said. 

More than 500 men, most of them married, are now preparing for the 
diaconate at 15 training centers across the country. 

Ordination of married deacons began last year, when John Cardinal 
Dearden of Detroit ordained six men and Laurence Cardinal Sheehan of 
Baltimore ordained six. 

Candidates for the diaconate must be at least 33. They can be married 
or single, but about 90 percent of those who have applied are married. 

If a married deacon becomes a widower, he cannot remarry. A single 
man, once ordained to the diaconate, is also ineligible to marry. 



Davis Dance Co. Here Today 

m ■ • ■ *» . . rw-»l_ _ * r * ^t Al_ _ s + • • t • A* „ f A _._ «*>*.** a *- Lts-k* i I* ft * i£\ 



Tonight at 8:00 p.m. at Bowker 
Auditorium, the Chuck Davis 
Dance Company will present a 
concert of original African dan- 
cing. 

CHUCK DAVIS, artistic director 
and choreographer of the CHUCK 
DAVIS DANCE COMPANY, and 
protege of Owen Dodson, formerly 
of Howard University, has studied 
classical dance with Emil Faustin, 
ethnic dance with Pearl Primus, 
jazz dance with Bernice Johnson, 
modern dance with Eleo Pomare, 
and ethnic, jazz, and modern dance 
with Syvilla Forte. In addition, he 
was awarded a residency in dance 
with the Royal Dancers from 
Burundi during their United States 
tour in 1964. In 1968 and 1971 he also 
participated in workshops with the 
Guinean Ballet Company during 
their tour of the United States. 

His professional experience as a 
dancer includes appearances as 
guest artist with MOVEMENTS 
BLACK-DANCE REPERTORY 
THEATRE, lead dancer with the 
OLATUNI DANCE TROUPE and 
soloist with the ELEO POMARE 
DANCE COMPANY. Mr. Davis 
has appeared as guest artist with 
the JOAN MILLER CHAMBER 
ARTS DANCE PLAYERS and the 
ORCHESTRA DA CAMERA. He 
has also appeared as the featured 
performer on C.B.S. TV's Camera 



3 production of "The Voice of the 
Khalm" and the soon to be seen 
A. B.C. TVs Like It Is production of 
"Today Is Tomorrow's Yester- 
day", his own choreographic 
dissertation on today's drug 
problem. 

In the past, in addition to 
productions for his own company, 
he has choreographed for the New 
York City Board of Education 
Teenage Performing Arts 
Workshop, the South Bronx 
Community Action Theatre, the 
Bernice Johnson Dance Company 
and the Lehman College Dance 
Theatre. 

At the present time, he is an 
adjunct professor of dance at 
Jersey City State College and a 
member of the dance faculty at 
Lehman College. He is also the 
Director of the Dance Workshop 
for the Minisink branch of the New 
York City Mission Society. 

THE CHUCK DAVIS DANCE 
COMPANY combines the talents 
and abilities of a group of young 
professional dancers and 
musicians whose background 
includes training and experience in 
the classical, ethnic, jazz and 
modern idioms. In the presentation 
of a unique repertoire, which in- 
cludes ethnic and modern dance, 
spanning the Black man's heritage 
from the jungles of Africa to the 



Civilization of America, they have 
appeared in concert on television 
and in colleges and theatres in the 
Northeastern part of the United 
States. They have presented lec- 
ture demonstrations on the 
"Rhythms of Africa" to thousands 
of elementary, junior and senior 
high school students, and in ad- 
dition, have offered master classes 
in modern and ethnic dance on the 
high school and college levels. 

In addition to the concert, the 
troupe will offer a master class to 
all holders of tickets for the 
evening event. The class will take 
place in WoPE Dance Studio this 
morning at 10:30 a.m. 

Tickets for the dance concert 
are available in the Student 
Activities Office of the Campus 
Center. UMass summer 
students may receive tickets 
by presenting their I.D.'s. 
Tickets for non-students are 
$1.50. Tickets may also be 
obtained at the Bowker 
Auditorium box office one hour 
before the performance. It is 
suggested that those attending 
the concert park their cars in 
the Campus Center Parking 
Garage. For information and 
ticket reservations, contact the 
Student Activities Office by 
calling 545-2351. 




University of Massachusetts 



July 20, 1972 



Volume I, Issue 7 



'The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Eagleton Supports F15 



WASHINGTON — Sen. Thomas 
Eagleton, the Democratic vice 
presidential nominee, said Wed- 
nesday he supports the F15. 

But he denied that his constitutes 
any major conflict with his 
presidential running mate. George 
McGovern, who opposes the new 
fighter plane. 

The St. Louis-built F15 was 
tossed into the political pot earlier 
in the week by Secretary of 
Defense Melvin R. Laird who 



suggested that the Missouri 
senator prevailed upon McGovern 
to drop his opposition to the plane 
in return for Eagleton's ac- 
ceptance of the vice presidential 
spot. 

Both McGovern and Eagleton 
scoffed at his suggestion on 
Tuesday, and Eagleton denied it 
again Wednesday in an interview 
with The Associated Press. 

In connection with his discussion 



Amtrak Crewmen Arrested 



suite officials in Oklahoma and 
Kansas boarded two different 
Amtrak trains Tuesday night and 
arrested crewmen on charges of 
illegal sale of liquor. 

Service of liquor on Amtrak 
trains passing through Oklahoma 
and the dry counties of Kansas was 
ordered suspended today after 
authorities in the two states 
boarded trains and arrested 
crewmen on illegal sale of liquor. 

Charles Martin, Amtrak district 
sales manager in St. Louis, whose 
region includes Missouri, Kansas 
and parts of Illinois, said Amtrak 
maintains the states cannot in- 
terfere in providing of services and 
"we consider the serving of 
alcoholic beverages as a service 
just as the airlines do as they fly 
over the states." 

The question "will probably wind 
up in court," he said. 
The arrests were made Tuesday 

night- 
Kansas Atty. Gen. Vern Miller 

and some agents boarded a Los 
Angeles-bound train at Kansas 
City and arrested the conductor, a 
bartender and a waiter as the train 
approached Newton in south- 
central Kansas. 



On the other train, bound for 
Oklahoma City, two Alcoholic- 
Beverage Control Board agents 
and an assistant Oklahoma County 
district attorney boarded the train 
at Ardmore and arrested the 
bartender just before reaching 
Oklahoma City. They also con- 
fiscated all liquor aboard. 

The bartender was taken to 
Oklahoma County Jail and charged 
with violating Oklahoma's law 
against operating open saloons and 
with selling liquor by the drink. 

The three crewmen aboard the 
Kansas train were charged with 
four misdemeanors and released on 
$5,000 bond each pending trial in 
Harvey County on Aug. 8. 

The charges filed against them 
were maintenance of an open 
saloon; consumption of liquor in an 
unauthorized place; possession of 
liquor without a Kansas tax stamp 
and sale of liquor without a license. 

Amtrak, the federally subsized 
corporation that runs the nation's 
rail passenger service, was 
warned last month by Oklahoma 
officials that the sale of liquor for 
consumption in their cars violated 
the state's constitutional 
prohibition of open saloons. 



of his difference with McGovern on 
the F15, Eagleton said that on 
future Senate votes there will be 
closer liaison with McGovern's 
office but he did not commit 
himself to voting as McGovern 
does on rvery issue. 

Although he said he hasn't 
changed his mind on the F15 since 
his nomination, he has on another 
subject: the way Missouri will go 
in the November election. 

He acknowledged that some 
weeks ago he bad doubts about 
McGovern's ability to carry 
>ouri. a swing state which has 
voted with the winner in every 
presidentidal election since 1891, 
except for 1956. 

"But I've changed my mind and 
I'm now optimistic about carrying 
Missouri," he said Wednesday. He 
added that he switched because of 
' the conduct of the Democratic 
convention in Miami Beach which 
was to me a breath of fresh air." 

Asked about the Laird 
suggestion of a deal on the F15, 
Eagleton said: "It's a complete 
figment of Mr. Laird's 
imagination. There is not an iota of 
substance to this allegation. I have 
not at any time discussed the F15 
with Sen. McGovern or with any 
member of McGovern's staff. 
Never. Ever." 

Later he said, "I'm for the F15. 
I've been for it. I remain for it." 

He was reminded that his South 
Dakota colleague has favored 
dropping the F15 as part of his 
program to cut defense spending 
and asked if this constitutes a 
conflict or embarrassment to 
either man. Eagleton replied: 

"I certainly don't look on it as an 
embarrassment. 

"There are no two individual 
senators who are carbon copies one 
unto the other." 




CHUCK DAVIS 



Patriots Reduced 



By ED BRYANT 

Attrition has begun to take its toll 
down at James House as the New 
England Patriots begin to pare 
down their roster to sixty men, the 
limit for August 8th. While there 
has still been no live scrimmage 
(tackling), the coaches are 
evaluating the potential of each 
player in a variety of ways. 

On July 18 the Patriots cut four 
players (three of them kickers). 
Peter Chartschlas, a place kicker 
from Barrington College, was 
given his release, leaving Charlie 
Gogolak and Mike "Superfoot" 
Walker as the placekickers. Mark 
Becker, from Holy Cross, and 
Danny Kastein of Northeastern 
were also cut. Both were punters. 
The other player released was 
tackle Mike Kelson, a rookie from 
Arkansas Rodney Cason. also a 
rookie tackle from Angelo Stale, 
left < amp for personal reasons 

Each morning and afternoon the 
u-am practices lor between an 
hour and a ball and two hours. 
Alter calisthenics and stretching 
exercise, the team breaks up by 
positions with their respective 
coaches. The offensive linemen 
work with Coach Bruce Beatty, 
practicing assignments and hitting 
the sleds. The tight ends and wide 
receivers go with Coach Jerry 
Stoltz, working on pass patterns. 

The quarterbacks and running 
backs were on running plays with 
Coach Sam Rutigliano. The 
defensive backs work on their 
reactions and tackling with Coach 



Tom Fletcher, while the 
linebackers wt>rk with Coach John 
Meyer. Later they slowly merge 
units into an eventual scrimmage. 
Although there is no tackling until 
'Saturday's scrimmage, there is 
plenty of contact particularly in 
the one-on one drills between the 
offensive and defensive linemen. 
Keeping a watchful eye over all 
this is Coach John Mazur, the Head 
Coach. General Manager Upton 
Bell is around when he is not back 
in Southwest trying to make a deal 
phone. 

Apart from all this during most 
of the practice is the kickers' 
practice. This area is perhaps the 
most critical problem the Patriots 
face this year. There is not a first- 
class punter here. None of the 
candidates show the kind of con- 
sistency necessary to punt in the 
NFL. A year ago, it seemed 
an unlikely proposition 

that anyone would miss 
Tom Janik and his 26-yard punts 
but there is no one in camp thus far 
to make anyone forget Tom Janik. 
it is possible that Gary Collins, 
former Cleveland Brown flanker 
and punter could be obtained, but 
the price tage may be too high, as 
Collins probably could not make 
this team as a receiver. For the 
parochially interested, UMass 
grad John O'Neil is still in the 
running for this kicking position. 

This Saturday will be the most 
important day thus far. There may 
be a lot of people gone after 
Saturday's scrimmage. 



Water Pollution Charge 

HADLEY — Engineer William J . Marren of 25 Woodlawn Rd. has asked 
the Public Health Center at the University of Massachusetts to in- 
vestigate what he contends is possible contamination to the town's main 
water supply on Mt. Warner in North Hadley. 

He blames faulty waste disposal of a new housing project on Hawley 

Street. 

In a letter to Angelo Iantosca, district engineer at the center, Marren 
states that "imminent contamination is highly probable because of 
construction techniques executed by the contractor." 

He claims topography of the area precludes effective leaching of septic 
tank material because of high clay content in addition to a high water 
table. 



Page T wo — Uni versity of Massachusetts — The Crier 



The Crier is a semi-weekly pub 1 cation of the Summer Session 1972, 
■ University of Massachusetts. Offic * ire located in the Campus Center, 
Student Activities Area, Unive. >ity of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is enV ->ly responsible for the contents. No 
copy is censored by the administration before Publication. Represented for 
national advertising by National Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1972 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

PERFORMING ARTS EDITOR Elleni Koch 

PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 

OCCASIONAL EDITORIAL CARTOONIST 



Shelly Karp 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



Joseph Alsop 



THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1972 



The Crier - University of Massachusetts - Page Three 



Which Political Rules? 




«I» 



WASHINGTON — After Miami 
Beach, the ghost of Frank R. Kent 
ought to haunt every senior 
political reporter. Besides great 
wit and charm, Frank had great 
talent as a political reporter. But 
when Franklin Delano Roosevelt 
changed all the old rules of our 
politics, Frank refused to admit 
the changes. So his reporting 
began to go very wrong indeed. 

There are those who think the 
rules of our politics have again 
been radically changed. They may 
be right. They may be disastrously 
wrong. All that is now certain, 
however, is that the nomination of 
Sen. George McGovern has 
produced an either-or situation 
without any recent precedent. 

Either the political rules have in 
fact changed— in which case the 
Democrats will win, and both 
American politics and American 
policy will take quite new direc- 
tions. Or the rules have not 
changed all that much— in which 
case, President Nixon will not only 
win but will also, at least very 
probably, make the Republicans 
into the country's majority party 
for a good many years to come. 
OLD-RULE' DISASTER 

Under the old rules, Democratic 
victory is demonstrably im- 



Fll see you in November" 



possible. The South has been given 
up. Organized labor has been 
enraged and alienated. The 
Republicans have been effectively 
conceded huge shares of the Irish, 
Italian and Slavic-Catholic votes, 
and maybe as much as half the 
Jewish vote. The state of Illinois 
has been sacrificed to the "new 
politicians' " loathing of Mayor 
Richard Daley. 

Frank Mankiewicz plainly 
wanted compromise. Initially, 
indeed, both Mankiewicz and Sen. 
McGovern even tried to prevent 
the challenge to the Daley 
delegation. But the brilliant young 
zealots leading the McGovern 
organization would permit no 
such concessions to the old political 
rules. 

These young men are in truth the 
source and fountainhead of the 
doctrine that all the rules have 
changed. Their view needs to be 
weighed, if only because they are 
obviously among the ablest new 
figures to appear on the political 
scene in a couple of decades. But 
their view also needs to be 
analyzed in the light of the 
ascertainable facts. 

For example, they say, with 
sublime confidence, that 
McGovern can afford to lose 
millions of other normally 



Democratic voters, because he will 
get virtually all the many millions 
of votes of those between the ages 
of 18 and 29. But will the senator 
really get the support of quite so 
many of these younger voters? 
POLLSTERS BUSY 

The pollsters have been working 
their computers overtime, to get a 
line on that question. The Gallup 
organization finds, for instance, 
that among the registered voters 
between 18 and 29, McGovern now 
has an important but not really 
enormous majority. The split is 53 
per cent for McGovern against 39 
per cent for President Nixon, with 
the rest undecided. 

Rather worse, the Gallup 
organization also finds that the 
split of all potential voters in this 
age group is only 49 for McGovern 
against 41 for Nixon, with the rest 
undecided. That means that among 
this age group's potential voters 
who have not yet registered, there 
is much, much more pro-Nixon, 
anti-McGovern sentiment than 
among those who are registered. 
Yet mass registration of the 
unregistered young, and getting 
out the whole young vote next 
November, are two of the prime 
aims of the youthful leaders of the 
McGovern organization. 



Campus Carousel 



UMass Marketplace 



Communications, Food Bank 



By TONY GRANITE 

UNUSUAL COURSE offerings 
are springing up on the campuses 
of the land, according to reports 
appearing in the student press. 
Which strains the rationale for 
dropping such curricula as Home 
Economics, Nursing and ROTC, 
that is happening. 

A VIKING LANGUAGE course- 
called 'Introduction to Early 
Norse"- is being introduced this 
Fall at the Mankato (Minn.) State 
campus, according to the Daily 
Reporter there. The three- 
quarters-long course may be used 
to fulfill language requirements to 
graduation. 

"Norse is the basis for so many 
languages and there is a wealth of 
information and material to use," 
says its instructor. The language is 
used primarily in Norway and 



Iceland. 



*** 



BODY LANGUAGE AND 
NON — VERB A L COM- 
MUNICATION is a new four-hour 
course being offered this summer 
at Florida State, according to the 
Flambeau. 

The course deals with exploring 
many of the areas of com- 
municating with others with their 
bodies without the use of words, 
says its bicycle-riding instructor. 
**** 

SPEED READING will be of- 
fered by the English Dept. of 
Mankato State, come Fall, as an 
elective. 

Objectives, according to the 
Daily Reporter, are to increase the 
student's rate of reading, increase 
his comprehension and retention of 
material, increase his ability to 



discriminate among kinds of 
materials he reads, and build 
vocabulary. 

MEANWHILE, at Central 
Washington State, the Campus 
Crier is reporting the establish- 
ment of a "food bank" for hungry 
students living off campus who 
won't have the benefits of food 
stamps or of the dining commons 
program. 

Run on the honor system, the 
"bank" will dispense food items 
based on stated need. Money for 
the project comes from individual 
donations, alumni donations and 
such enterprises as a hamburger 
stand in one of the dormitory 
complexes. The off-campus 
building headquarters for the 
project has been donated, too. 

Sparking the "bank" is a fresh- 
man who is "concerned". 




John Tegley-A Bigger Job Ahead 



BY STEPHEN SMITH 

The metamorphasis of John 
Tegley occurred a few months 
back. He cut his hair, began 
dressing more conservatively, 
and, formerly a stranger to 
selectmen's meeting, started 
appearing at the board's weekly 
sessions. 

"He must be looking for another 
job," it was joked at the press table 
during one selectmen's meeting. 

And sure enough, last week it 
was announced that Tegley would 
be leaving his post as assistant to 
the town manager here to become 
the town administrator in Easton, 
a town of 12,300 in the eastern 
portion of the state. 

Tegley is a tall, thin man of 34 
with a pleasant demeanor and a 
moustache which is beginning to 
form handlebars. During his two 
years on the job here, he has oc- 
cupied an office-which by virtue of 
its customary semi-darkness 
contrasts sharply with the glaring 
fluorescence of its neighbors~on 
the second floor of town hall. 

He is not an easy man to talk to, 
much less interview. Combine an 
agile mind, a penchant for the 
polysyllablic, the jargon from his 
political science education, and a 
subtle sense of humor, and you've 
got a John Tegley conversation. He 
is also when he wants to be, a 
master of the evasive answer. 

"John is a provocative person," 
remarked Town Manager Allen 



Torrey. "Arguing with him is good 
for you because he challenged 
you." 

'Series Of Accidents' 
Tegley became assistant to the 
town manager "through a long 
series of accidents". Born in Pitt- 
sburg, he lived for a wnue in 
Wheeling, W. Va., before going to 
San Francisco to attend college 
and work. In between, he served 
four years in the military. 

In 1967 he and his wife Janet 
moved to Amherst, where he did 
work on his masters and doctorate 
in urban studies and public ad- 
ministration at the University of 
Massachusetts. Then, while 
engaged in the "schizoid life style" 
of working half-time at the 
university as a research assistant 
and half-time teaching at Holyoke 
Community College, the position 
here opened up. 

"This seemed like a good bet," 
Tegley explained. "It was kind of 
in line with my expectations for the 
future." His association with the 
valuable one, said Tegley, who 
described it as "a very pleasant 
and professionally rewarding 
experience". 

"What I've really enjoyed most 
is working with people in town 
government and with the public," 
he said. "Amherst is unusually 
blessed with an abundance of 
people who listen, in and out of 
town government. It also has the 
capacity to respond quickly to its 



needs." 

Strewn Desk 

A familiar town hall sight was 
Tegley either banging away oh his 
adding machine working on the 
budget or trying to organize the 
dummies for the town report 
which were strewn all over his 
desk. These tasks were listed by 
Torrey as two of Tegley's main 
contributions. 

In addition, the town manager 
praised his assistant's role in the 
collective bargaining process and 
his personnel work which included 
the establishment of the incentive 
pay arrangements for police and 
firemen. 

"John's got an awful lot of 
ability, he can turn out an awful lot 
of work, and give the board 
(selectmen in Easton) what they 
need," said Torrey. What they 
need, he said, is "full-time 
professionalism." 

Tegley is walking into an in- 
teresting situation in Easton. Like 
Amherst, the town has a five- 
member board of selectmen, but 
unlike Amherst, it has no set 
charter to denote the functions of 
government. 

Calling it an "open-ended 
charter", Tegley said "no one 
really knows how it works -Easton 
is one of the first towns to adopt 
this format". He explained that it 
"places the responsibility of the 
administrator to develop an ad- 



ministrative code or by-law' 
which goes to town meetings for 
approval. 

Keeps The Faitft 

Tegley, who says he has "im- 
plicit faith in the system", sees his 
job, which is basically the same as 
the town manager post here, as one 
of maintaining communications 
between conflicting interests in the 
community and then "going about 
delivering after the public says 
what it wants". 

He also sees a national trend 
among town administrators, and 
for that matter, people in all 
professions, "to speak to the 
issues". 

"The manager does have a 
responsibility to advocate 
policy but not necessarily to lead 
it or guide it. I don't think any 
individual can divorce himself 
from the responsibility of taking a 
position. The task is how to take 
that position in the context of what 
you're involved in." 

The new town administrator has 
a high regard for citizen par- 
ticipation. "To the extent that it is 
representative of the community, 
town meeting is tremendous. It's 
like any public institution— it has 
its strengths and liabilities. But it's 
not what town meeting is, it's what 
town meeting does. What you're 
really asking is can the public be 
collectively responsible for the 
future. The answer is an emphatic 
'yes'. ..there are no alternatives." 



The move to Easton is not 
without its drawbacks. For one. 
there is the problem of moving. For 
another, Tegley's wife Janet has a 
career of her own as a reading 
teacher in the South Hadley School 
System. 

With a "deep commitment to 
women's lib," Tegley says if 
suitable employment cannot be 
found for his wife in the Easton 
area, he will endure a long 
separation rather than ask her to 
sacrifice "a year of professional 
development." 

When not on the job, Tegley 
plays tennis, golf, skis, and "I 
watch Christopher grow'' 
Christopher is his two and one-half 
year- old son, who is currently 
going through the ordeal of "potty 
training". "It's a lot of fun," 
Tegley said, "although he's 
probably suffering a little bit 
because of the trauma." 

The only trauma Tegley may 
face in Easton, said Torrey, is that 
"for the first time the full weight of 
the responsibility will be on his 
shoulders". And then, of course, 
there is the inherently transient 
nature of the job. 

"I've known many people in and 
outside town government who 
think the position is suicidal," 
laughed Tegley. "Really, there is 
no tenure in this iob--it's all by the 
seat of your pants". 

(Reprinted from The Daily 
Hampshire Gazette) 




As opposed to Munson H.U. The University Press is now lo»«d »t .hi, house on E.s. P.e.s.0. Stre*. 
(Photo by Carl Nash) 

Joe, the cat in the bookcase, has also taken up residence at the new UMass press home, (right) (Photo 
by Larry Gold) 




Money Shortage Slows Production 

J ^"^ . , *. - n t Dubhshed eignty-seven books since as we have more books < 



(Part II of an in depth look at the 
UMass Press.) 



By LISA CARTILLO 

"What I do is take the edited 
manuscripts and transform them 
into printed works," said Richard 
Hendle, press typographer. "It's a 
kind of aesthetic engineering." 
Hendle deals with the type, bin- 
dings, paper and general format of 
the book. He expresses a 
designer's dream, "Someday I'd 
like to do a big square book. It just 
wouldn't be practical though." 

Tight finances have necessitated 
lower quality paper and bindings. 
Nevertheless, his book designs 
have been in every important book 
show, so even with these cuts, 
we're still doing high quality 
books. With the press for five 
years, seventeen of his books have 
appeared in shows. 

Dean Appley commends the 
Press for ' being "very 
distinguished for one so young." 
Pat Reilly, promotion manager, 
speculates on why the Press is so 
successful. "Mrs. Stein has a 
pretty unusual personal theory. 
One manifestation of this is "she 
keeps the staff alerted as to what 
she's doing." At weekly meetings, 
the staff assembles and exchanges 
progress reports on books, design 
or any other new information. 
"She's a Quaker by religion. It has 
something to do with her concept 
on the open meeting," added 

Reilly. 

Very creative suggestions nave 
arisen out of their weekly brain 
storming sessions. The idea of a 
combination poster, book review 



Hendle agrees that there are 
"better communications here than 
any place else I've ever worked." 
If there is a problem, there is no 
middle man. It is resolved face to 
face, according to Hendle. "We all 
have a certain amount of 
autonomy," he commented. The 
fact that the turnover in 
professional staff has been 
relatively nil proves that 
something good is happening. 

As far as working conditions are 
concerned, "you get someone you 



published eighty-seven books since 

Certainly the attractiveness of v % ' tack in 

this catalogue is "J**** £n ds W the situation could be 

enhance sales in the coming year, »« < 

a major concern of the Pjomfon **^^SS*m granted by 

department. "As we are not on ^ school and £ now . 

what you call a New York s , federa i fun ds the 
publishing budget, we have to get 



the most" mileage out of our ef- 
forts," informs Reilly. The 
promotion people write the book 
jackets, catalogue blurbs and news 
releases. They deal with the author 
from the standpoint of 
publications. Radio has been used 



sre*w=5S ? ■«- rt25/.:rx£2 



them do it." The truth of this is 
carried out to the exgent that there 
is no punch clock. Hours are not 
regulated. In the case of one girl 
who has a horse, it is more con- 
venient for her to come in at 7:30 
a.m. and work until 3:00. Then she 
has the afternoon free to tend to 
her equestrian interests. Another 
girls comes in on Saturdays. There 
is an equilibrium with no sur- 
veillances. 

"People don't abuse the thing 



is made to library and academic 
journals for the advancement of 

S31GS 

In a recent New Yorker 
magazine, John Updike gave a fine 
review of a UMass Press book by 
EM. Beekman called Patriotism 
Inc. : Tales by Paul van Ostaijen. 
The book is "a collection of the 
remarkable prose of a Flemish 
writer." 

For a press that hasn't built up a 
very big backlog of books, "It has 
done remarkably well," com- 



feopie aon i auusc urc n««»6, done remarn.auiy w«=w, *.»*..• 
they really don't," assures Reilly, m ends Dean Appley. Most presses 
"although I don't know if it would can re i y on the sales of their older 
work on a large scale. Because books, but when a press is young, 
Mrs Stein is so good, everybody tremendous backlog sales do not 
■ give her a good day's exist. The UMass Press has 



wants to give her a . 
work." Theoretically, if this 
system were abused, each em- 
ployee would be obligated to in- 
form the other of his respon- 
sibilities or to find out what the 
problem is. It operates on the idea 
that creativeness, "can't be 
packaged," stated Reilly. 

Another example of the in- 
novative attitude of the Press was 
its flexibility when Hendle decided 
to go on a one-year leave of ab- 



University Press has managed to 
survive. 

"We operate at a deficit as it is," 
reports Leone Stein, "you can't 
break even. Inventories pile up." 
Because the publishing program is 
"not central to the curriculum, all 
this crunch' means is that the 
University Press will have to put 
out less titles than usual," 
speculated Stein. Another solution 
might be to obtain more subsidies. 

"All we want to do is go on 
publishing books," Stein later said. 
Presently the budget for the 
coming fiscal year is unknown. 

A routinte review will take place 
August 1-2, as four directors from 
other comparable university 
presses have been requested to 
come and make recommendations 
to the graduate school concerning 
the state of affairs at the UMass 
Press, according to Dean Appley. 
Said Appley, "It is not because we 
are suspicious. The financial 
position of the press has improved 



as we have more books on the list. 
We are proud of our press and we 
hope that it will continue to grow if 
it were paying its own way." 

The financial picture is one of 
major concern not only for the 
UMass Press and the graduate 
school to whom the press reports, 
but to university presses all across 
the nation. Since 1968 there has 
been a 40% drop in the amount of 
titles published by university 
presses. Some presses are cutting 
back in the number of titles 
printed, some are suspending their 
services, others are remaining 
untouched. Hopefully the UMass 
Press will be amongst the latter of 
the three. 

(All is not rosey at the UMass 

Press. Part III on Tuesday will 
enlighten some.) 



Deerfield Drive-In 
Theatre 

Route 5 A 10 
South Deerfield, Massachusetts 

Tel. 665 8746 

NOW — Ends Tues. 

feu liked 

It before. «o he* 
back with mote, 



Cooperative Extension 
Lists Resource Agents 

M/icoH Pnnnprative Extension . , i „i„ 



combination poster, dook «v«™ - ^ availabUit 

was conceived and developed by s Eckerslev . a 



the group. A recent poster displays 
Leonard Baskin's sketch of a 
character in Beowulf, a UMass 
press book, translated by Burton 
Raff el As a result, other 
publishing houses have in- 
corporated the poster idea into 
their sales promotion schemes as 
well. 



Hijacking Should 
Become Rare-Shaffer 

Washington— Federal Aviation 
Administrator John H. Shaffer said 
yesterday airline extortion at- 
tempts may eventually become as 
much a rarity as hijackings to 
Cuba, through sheer frustration of 
the would-be air pirate. 

The reasons for this, Shaffer 
said, are ever increasing airplane 
and airening of attitude on the part 
of the airlines and flight crews. 

"At one point when the hijacker 
was a Havana type, non-violent, 
non.threatening, not seeking 
hostages or attempting extortion- 
there was an attitude of toleran- 
ce " Shaffer said in an interview. 



of a friend, Richard Eckersley, a 
superb English designer, Hendle 
and Eckersley made an exchange, 
each living in the other's home and 
likewise holding the other's job. 
Eckersley is responsible for this 
year's eyecatching UMass Press 
Catalogue of Books. Interspersed 
throughout its pages are designs 
and illustrations from various 
UMass Press books. Pointing to 
one of the pictures, Press ac- 
countant, Rich Lozier commented, 
"It's neat to look through the 
catalogue and see a tree and then a 
bird. I think he did a real good 
job." 



A revised Cooperative Extension 
Service directory of natural 
resource agencies in 

Massachusetts is now available at 

UMass. 

The 58-page Massachusetts 
Natural Resources Directory lists 
67 selected public and private 
agencies with a brief statement of 
the overall objectives of each, a 
more detailed listing of specific 
activities, and addresses and 
phone numbers. 

The list includes Massachusetts 
bureaus of the large number of 
federal agencies operating in the 



natural resource and planning 
areas, many state agencies, and a 
variety of quasi-public and private 
groups-watershed councils, 
outdoor organizations and con- 
servations groups. 

Its main purpose is to aid in 
locating sources of assistance in 
solving resource and planning 
problems at the local and private 
level of decision making. It is 
available at no cost from 
Cooperative Extension Service, 204 
Holdsworth Hall, UMass, Amherst, 
01002. 



DOUBLE FEATURE 

Dracula 

With BelaLugosi 

Directed by Tod Browning 

And 

Kiss of the Vampire 

in Color 
Friday, July 21 8:30 p.m. 

Amherst 
Folklore Center 

Behind the Lord Jeff 



DOUBLE FEATURE FILM SERIES 

"All The King's 
Mm" 



7 p.m. 



"The 
Caine Mutiny 



if 




Ml/Jin 



! i : i' 



METROCOOfi 

also 
Oliver Reed Jill St. Jill 



m 



© 

MOM 



9 p.m. 



Tuesday. July 26 
Campus Center Auditorium 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 




SITTING 




si 



© 



Feature First 
Wed, thur, Sun, Mon, T ues 



THURSDAY, JULY 20. 1972 



Page Four - University of Massachusetts - The Crier 




Review-Mt. Holyoke 

Any Wednesday-Tedious 

J . ..._; „~,o„ ^rii*n well However, the tone of his > 



THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1972 
I 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Five 



By BRENDA FURTAK 
AND JIM GOLD 

While most of "Any Wed- 
nesday", which opened at Mt. 
Holyoke Summer Theater Tuesday 
night, lives up to its description of 
light-hearted comedy, it came 
across quite tediously. 



Cleves, a rich businessman, Ellen, 
his mistress, and Cass, a small 
businessman from Akron, Ohio, 
who was mistaken by Mr. Cleves 
to be Ellen's husband. 

Set in New York, the play 
revolves around the relationships 
and how they are 



well. However, the tone of his voice 
rarely seemed right. His failure to 
deliver lines well caused the 
failure several times of what would 
have been humorous lines. 

Saving the play from total 
mediocrity, Beebee Horowitz, as 
Mrs. Cleves, a high class, 
cosmopolitan socialite, bustled 
about the stage entering into 
everyon's business. Some bright 
lines accentuated the almost trite 

plot. 

When Ellen blurted out on her 
birthday to Cass that she was 



Studying outdoors is often easier than studying indoors. Obviously, 
according to this girl near the Campus Pond. (Photo by Larry Gold) 

'See How They Run' 
Next At Mt. Holyoke 

Next week the Mt. Holyoke Summer Theater will present "See How 
They Run". A riot of laughter and hysterical farce erupts in the vicarage 
of a small, peaceful British village. Mistaken identities and assorted 
people masquerading as vicars comprise the hilarious free-for-all chase. 

In the center of this confusion, although still on the run themselves, are 
Penelope Toop (Nana M. Greenwald) , the zany American wife of the real 
vicar, and an unsuspecting American airman (Michael Walder). 



of the four 

The opening scene was slow, treated by Mr. Cleves 
Action 23 interest in the play did John A. Caldwell played Mr 

not pick up until an unsuspecting Cleves vtry Jwgtty and 

Mrs Cleves walked onto what she mechanically. Although he knew 

thought was the executive suite of his lines well, Caldwell did not 

her husband's company. The play present them naturally. 

SSfirt'STSST'S. thSS£"S5 ***r*™^r?<»™ 

ieves > look thirty." "But it just happened 

today," she cried out. 

Muriel Resnick, the play's 
author, also created interesting 
metaphors between fist fights and 
grammar. 

Despite some entertaining 
features, the play dragged. This 
and the heat and humidity inside 
the Mt. Holyoke tent were 
responsible for the feeling of 
gratitude when the play finally 



'Fiddler On The Roof 
Returns To Storrowton 



West Springfield, Mass. -- 
"Fiddler on the Roof", the world's 
most acclaimed musical, opens at 
Storrowton Theatre, for one week 
only on July 24, starring Robert 
Merrill, a leading baritone for the 
Metropolitan Opera. He will 
portray the role of Tevye, the 
impoverished dairyman with five 
daughters, a shrewish wife and a 
lame horse in the longest running 
show in Broadway's history. 



The book, written by Joseph 
Stein, who also wrote "Zorba", 
with music and lyrics by Jerry 
Bock and Sheldon Harnick, is 
based on stories compiled by 
Sholom Aleichem depicting life of 
the Jews in Czarist Russia during 
the years 1905 through 1910. 



Stones Plead Innocence 
Arrest Delays Concert 



BOSTON — Fresh from a bout Police at the Garden were 
with police and a photographer needed to put down a third con- 
that kept 15,000 waiting for five secutive night of violence in the 
hours, the Rolling Stones said city's South End. 
Wednesday they were innocent of During the 75-minute per- 
all charges and pledged to deliver formance, the 29-year-old Jagger, 
their second Boston Garden con- clad in a purple jumpsuit laced 



publisher of Rhode Island's 
largest daily newspapers, 



"Fiddler", which takes place in 
Anatevka, a village in Russia, 
revolves around traditions which 
bend and break. One of Tevye's 
daughters wants to marry a poor 
tailor instead of a well-to-do but- 
cher. Another pledges herself to a 
student and revolutionary without 
even asking her father's per- 
mission, just his blessing. A third 
favors a Gentile which pushes 
Tevye and tradition too far. 

Tevye talks directly with God 



Co., 
two 
announced plans to bring civil suit and J forsees ^ next non 

blessing that God is going to give 
him well ahead of time. 
Tickets for "Fiddler on the 



cert on schedule. 

Another packed house was ex- 
pected for the Wednesday night 
performance following the 
previous night's skirmish that left 
the English rock group's vocalist 
and lead guitarist housed tem- 
porarily in a Rhode Island jail. 

The two Stones, Mick Jagger and 
Keith Richard, and three members 
of their traveling entourage have 



with rhinestones, told the crowd 
the Garden "is better than War- 
wick". 

"Our thanks to the Mayor of 
Boston," Jagger said. "He helped 
us get out of that jail." 

William Radican, a Warwick 
police commander who was in the 
charge of the police contingent 
which arrested the Stones, said he 
would not have agreed to releasing 



been ordered to appear in Warwick the arrested Stones from custody 



District Court in Rhode Island Aug. 
23 to answer charges stemming 
from a brawl with a photographer, 
Andy Dickerman, and Warwick 
police. 

The five were released from 
custody in Warwick after Boston 
Mayor Kevin H. White said if the 
Stones weren't rolling toward his 
city soon he'd have trouble con- 
trolling the 15,509 who had come to 
hear the group that was born in the 
Beatles era and has topped the 
fields of hard and acid rock. 

The crowd waited, until nearly 1 
am., passing rubber footballs and 
generally heeding White's plea for 
calm. 

CIC To Meet 

There will be a meeting of the 
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 
COMMITTEE on Tuesday, July 25, 
1972, at 8:00 p.m. in Room 12 of 
First Congregational Church, 165 
Main Street, Amherst. The agenda 
includes discussion of actions for 
the summer and planning of 
strategy for the fall. 

The COMMUNITY IN- 
VOLVEMENT COMMITTEE was 
founded on the premise that 
students (short-term residents) 
from area colleges and area long- 
term residents could jointly work 
toward the heightening of 
awareness of the inter-dependence 
of consumer price increase, wage 
freeze, big business deals, racism, 
pollution, increased taxes, the 
Vietnam War, and American 
foreign and domestic policies. 

Call 549-6394 for more in- 
formation. 



Tuesday night if Boston had not 

been faced with several trouble 

areas, including its South End 
problems. 

"I have no interest in concerts," 
Radican said at a Wednesday 
afternoon news conference. 

Warwick Mayor Philip Noel, a 
Democratic candidate for 
governor, said he believed the city 
had been quite fair to the Stones in 
agreeing to release them and said 
there is no way the five persons 
facing charges could avoid the 
Aug. 23 court appearance. 

Noel said they could either ap- 
pear on that date and plead guilty 
or ask for a trial, which he said 
would be held at a later date. 

Meanwhile, Dickerman's em- 
ployer, the Providence Journal 



the Stones' entourage, Stanley A 
Moore. 

Jagger and Marshall Chess, 
president of Rolling Stones 
Records, are charged with ob- 
struction of a police officer, while 
Robert Frank, 46, is charged with 
assault of a uniformed police of- 
ficer. All charges except that 
against Frank are misdemeanors. 
All five entered pleas of innocent. 

Dickerman said the airport 
skirmish began when he was 
forcibly ejected from a fire engine 
shed at the Rhode Island airport 
where the Stones had taken refuge 
to wait for their luggage and 
clearance through customs after 
their flight from Montreal. 

"I wanted to take pictures of the 
leaders," Dickerman said. "I went 
over to take a picture of Mick 
Jagger. I did, but I think he turned 
away. 

"I wanted to shoot another one 
when a tall, slender man rushed at 
me with a leather belt. He swung 
and the belt hit me in the left side." 

Dickerman said he then 
telephoned police, who reported 
that upon arriving at the airport 
they saw Richard punch Dicker- 
man with a belt wrapped around 
his hand. 

Police said Jagger, Chess and 
Frank became involved in a scuffle 
with them when they tried to put 
Richard in a police car. 



on 

Roof" and all the Storrowton 
Theatre productions are available 
at the Storrowton box office 
located at the site of orange and 
green tent on the Exposition 
grounds or by calling 732-1101 in 
the Greater Springfield area or 522- 
5211 in the Greater Hartford area. 



Crawford And 

Bo part Films 
Here Tuesday 

This week the Summer Film 
Programme will be showing the 
Oscar winning film "All the King's 
Men" at 7:00 p.m. and "The Caine 
Mutiny" at 9:00 p.m. on Tuesday, 
July 25 in the Student Union 
Ballroom. "All the King's Men" is 
a story of the rise to power of a 
man and a political machine, 
showing a surface of public con- 
cern and graft and corruption 
beneath. Stars Broderick 
Crawford. 

"The Caine Mutiny", starring 
Humphrey Bogart, is the thrilling 
story of a World War II 
minesweeper whose officers take 
control after deciding the captain 
is mentally unfit for command, and 
of the court martial which follows. 
The films are shown without 
charge but UMass summer 
students with ID's will be admitted 
first. 






TONIGHT 

in the BLUEWALL 

Wheeler's 
Egyptian Dog 



9:00 p.m. til 1:00 o.m. 





AFL-CIO 

Withholds 
Endorsement 



Candlemaker accents CC Marketplace. (Photo by Larry Gold) 

4 More Dead in Belfast 



BELFAST, Northern Ireland — 

Bombs and gunfire claimed four 
more lives Wednesday in Northern 
Ireland only hours after new secret 
efforts were started to restore 
peace to the province. 

The victims included a 71-year- 
old man, gunned down by 
terrorists in a Belfast bar, and a 6- 
month-old boy, killed in his baby 
carriage by a car-bomb that ex- 
ploded in the town of Strabane. 

The blast 100 yards from the 
infant's carriage also seriously 
wounded the baby's mother, two 
other women and a 15-year-old girl. 

The deaths raised to at least 448 
the number of lives lost in three 
years of sectarian turmoil, with 240 
killed this year in the worst tur- 
bulence in 50 years. 

The peace moves were reported 



party leader and former prime 
minister, but returned to Dublin 
without disclosing the outcome. 

Wilson is expected to provide 
details of the meeting Thursday to 
the British administrator for 
Northern Ireland, William 
Whitelaw. 

But Whitelaw is unlikely to ac- 
cept a peace bid unless the IRA 
alters its terms. He already has 
rejected its demands that the 
British military withdraw from 

Northern Ireland, amnesty be, 

granted to all Provisionals and the 

British allow the Irish to decide 

their own future. 
In the latest fighting, two men 

were shot and killed by terrorists 

gunmen in Belfast. 
One was a British soldier caught 

at an army post in the heavily 



WASHINGTON — AFL-CIO 
President George Meany an- 
nounced Wednesday that the 
politically powerful labor 
federation will not endorse either 
Democratic nominee George S. 
McGovern or President Nixon in 
the November White House 
election. 

The executive council of the 13.6- 
million member labor federation, 
which has supported all past 
Democratic presidential can- 
didates, this time will concentrate 
on electing its friends in Congress, 
Meany said. 

The 35-man labor council, by a 

„ vote of 27-3, adopted this 
edge of the Catholic New Lodge statement 



area. Troops in the An 
derstonstown area also came 
under fire but no casualties were 
reported 



'Under the circumstances, the 
AFL-CIO will refrain from en- 
dorsing either candidate for the 



reporiea. . __ # 

Minister Asked To Resign 
After Swimsuit Contest 



ATHENS, Ala. — Four elders 
have asked their minister to resign 
because his daughter wore a 
swimsuit in a beauty pageant 
which she won. 

Other members of the West 
Hobbs Street Church of Christ are 
circulating a petition seeking the 
ouster of the four men. 

The minister, Charles Marshall, 

Becky, 17, 



and nis aaug , 
by wellgrounded sources who said Roman Catholic Springfield Road dec lined to comment 



the extremist Provisional wing of 
the Irish Republican Army is 
ready to call a new cease-fire to 
replace the short truce it ended 10 
days ago. 

Provisional leaders met secretly 
in London for five hours Tuesday 
with Harold Wilson, British Labor 



. He was the 100th soldier to 
die in the three years of turmoil. 
The second bullet victim was a 
factory watchman. 

Authorities reported other 
scattered shooting in Belfast. They 
said sniper fire wounded a British 
soldier at an army patrol on the 



Anti-busing Bill Approved 



WASHINGTON (AP) — A House 
education subcommittee approved 
President Nixon's anti-bussing bill 
Wednesday but without the money 
he requested to upgrade ghetto 
schools. 

The subcommittee rejected, 9 to 
7. the administration's request for 
$2.5 billion to improve the quality 
of inner-city education, then sent 
the stripped bill to the Education 
and Labor Committee by voice 
vote. The committee is expected to 
take it up next Tuesday. 

The bill's main purpose now is to 
limit the remedies the courts can 
apply to overcome segregation. 
Bussing could be used only above 
the elementary school level, and 
then only as a last resort. 

The bill would permit school 
districts now under court bussing 
orders to bring them into line with 
the proposed remedies. 

There are seven remedies that 
must be considered by the courts in 
the order listed in the legislation 
before any bussing can be 
required. 

They include assigning pupils to 
schools closest to their homes, 



permitting them to transfer to 
schools where their race is in the 
minority, revising attendance 



Newsmen Seek 
Protection 

Of Sources 

MIAMI. Fla. - The Inter- 
American Press Association asked 
Wednesday that Congress enact 
legislation that will allow newsmen 
to protect the anonymity of their 
sources. 

John C.A. Watkins, president of 
the IAPA and publisher of the 
Providence, R.I., Journal-Bulletin, 
said failure to do so would 



Miss Marshall, a 5-foot-7 blonde, 
was named Miss Spirit of America 
July 4 at a pageant in Decatur, Ala. 
She also was named Miss 
Photogenic, and, ironically, the 
photograph of her used in the 
judging was taken by one of the 
four elders, Charles Bain, a 
professional photographer. 

Herbert Chittam read a 
statement to the church Sunday 
saying he and the other three had 
asked Marshall to resign because 
of the "image that has been cast 
upon the church recently." 

Marshall was not allowed to 
preach Sunday. A substitute 
minister conducted services. 

One of the elders said they have 
agreed not to comment on the 
matter. 

Meanwhile, 13 copies of a 
petition began circulating among 
the church members. It says that 
the signers no longer recognize the 
four as elders, claiming they acted 
in haste and without consulting the 
400 members before demanding 
that the Rev. Mr. Marshall resign 



zone^'buiWing^new schools and seriously undermine the public's from the pastorate he has held for 



establishing so-called magnet 
schools that attract pupils from all 
over a district. 

Most of the discussion in the 
subcommittee centered on the 
administration's proposal to 
concentrate funds in 

predominantly black inner-city 
schools as an alternative to trying 
to upgrade them through 
desegregation. The provision was 
eliminated by Rep. Albert H. Quie, 
R-Minn., whose substitute bill was 
adopted. Quie said consideration of 
the provision now would com- 
plicate passage of the bill. He said 
he had discussed his plan with 
administration officials and 
received no objections. 

Congress already has passed and 
Nixon signed into law a provision 
that prevents any new court 
bussing orders from taking effect 
until all appeals have been 
exhausted. The effectiveness of the 
new law is now being tested in the 
Detroit case. 



right to be informed. 

Said Watkins: "It is a well- 
known fact that investigative 
journalists often succeed, when 
they police and other investigators 
do not, in bringing before the 
public cases of corruption, 
misfeasance and unlawfulness. 

Their sources of information 
would obviously disappear it tney 
were publicly identified. The losers 
would be the public and everyone 
interested in honesty and justice." 

Earlier this year, the U.S. 
Supreme Court ruled that the First 
Amendment did not protect 
newsmen from revealing con- 
fidential information or its sources 
to grand juries. 



nine years 

If more than half the members 
sign, the four will be asked to give 
up their posts. 



office of President of the United 
States. 

"These circumstances call, 
rather, for the maximum con- 
centration of effort on the election 
of senators and representatives 
whose records commend them to 
the working, people of America. 

"Affiliates are, of course, free to 
endorse and support any candidate 
of their choice." 

Leaders of several of the AFL- 
CIO's 117 individual unions have 
endorsed or said they would en- 
dorse McGovern. One-the Marine 
Engineers Beneficial Association- 
has endorsed Nixon. 

Five members of the labor 
council reportedly leaning to 
McGovern did not attend the 
meeting. 

One of them, President Joseph A. 
Beirne of the Communications 
Workers, sent a letter to Meany 
urging endorsement of McGovern, 
the Associated Press learned. 

The three union chiefs who 
wanted to endorse McGovern and 
voted against the neutral policy 
were Jerry Wurf of the American 
Federation of State, County and 
Municipal Workers; Al Grospiron 
of the Oil, Atomic and Chemical 
Workers, and Paul Jennings of the 
International Union of Electrical 
Workers. 

"I believe that if I become 
president, you will be proud of my 
administration. Both my campaign 
and my administration, however, 
need your advice, experience and 
strength," McGovern wrote to all 
members of the AFL-CIO council 
plus a number of other union 
chiefs. 

"I wih not endorse, I will not 
support and I will not vote for 
Richard Nixon for President of the 
United States," Meany said in 
answer to a question at a news 
conference. 

"I will not endorse, I will not 
support and I will not vote for 
George McGovern for President of 
the United States," Meany said. 
Earlier, it was reported that 
Meany was not accepting calls 
from Sen. Thomas F. Eagleton of 
Missouri, the Democratic vice 
presidential nominee who has been 
regarded as close to organized 
labor. 



CHUCK DAVIS 

Dance Company 



l 



r 



he PLACE THAT MADE 
AMHERST FAMOUS 
DRAKE RESTAURANT 



2 

< 

i 

< 



Village Inn = 

RATHSKELLAR £ 

85 AMITY 253 2548 O 



Rhode Island Primary 



PROVIDENCE — A three- 
judge U.S. District Court panel 
today declared un- 

constitutional Rhode Island's 
law that binds a voter to a 
party for 26 months, throwing 
into doubt the conduct of the 
Sept. 12 primary. 

The court did not substitute a 
shorter time period, ap- 
narently leaving persons free 
u vote for candidates in either 
o e of the major parties 
regardless of their previous 
voting history. 

The decision is causing 
concern among state officials. 

ov. Frank Licht has 



scheduled a meeting for 9 a.m. 
Thursday with Atty. Gen. 
Richard J. Israel, members of 
the state Board of Elections, 
legislative leaders and other 
officials to discuss the impact 
of the decision. 

Maurice W. Hendel, law 
revision officer in the 
Secretary of State's office, said 
the decision "can have a 
decided effect on the Sep- 
tember primary, particularly 
if they the judges set no other 
limitations." 

The law struck down 
prohibited Rhode Island from 
voting in primaries of one 





party, if they have voted in a 
primary or signed nation 
papers for candidates of 
another party within the 
previous 26 months. 

Today's decision was written 
by Judge Raymond J. Pettine 
and concurred in by Judges 
Edward M. McEntee and 
Edward W. Day. 

It enjoins Rhode Island 
election officials from en- 
forcing the statute. It also 
directs Harry F. Curvin, 
chairman of the state Board of 
Elections, to furnish all 
election officials with a notice 
of the decision. 



Thursday, July 20 

Dance Concert 8 p.m> 

Bowher Auditorium 

(For Concert Ticket Holders) 

Master Class 10:30 a.m. 
WOPE Studio 



Tickets available at Student Activities Office 

Level One, Campus Center 

UMass Summer Students — Free with ID 

Others — $1.50 



THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1972 




Summer Weekly 
Track Meets 



Intramural Swim Meet coming up: Wednesday, July 26th. Entries will be token up to swim time. 
Mens, women's and co-rec races will be held at Boyden Pool at 6:00 p.m. The meet is open to summer 
students, faculty and staff. _^_^^^_^___^^_^^_^^^^^_^^^^_^^^^^^^^ 



By TOM HOVIIANNES 

A summer-long series of All- 
Comer track meets are held every 
Thursday evening beginning at 
6:30 at the UMass track and are 
open to the whole University 
community. 

The regular track events will be 
held weekly with additional special 
events. The special event this week 
will be a one-mile walk. 

Competition is according to 
ability so each race is in several 
sections. Women as well as men 
are encouraged to compete in one 
of three sections, beginner, novice, 
and advanced. 

The events include: 1-mile, 100 
yards, 220 yards, 440 yards, 880 
yards, and 2-mile relays. Relay 
teams may be composed of any 
persons and do not have to be from 



Ihe same school. 

Tom Derderian and Charlotte 
Lettis are directing the series with 
the intent to encourage more 
participation in track at all 
competitive levels. 

The new UMass all-weather 
track is located in the athletic 
fields across from Boyden Gym. 



5-College 

Info 
545-2566 



Colleges and Universities 
Report Lower Enrollments 



Colleges and universities across 
the country, only two months away 
from the start of a new school year, 
still have room for at least 300,000 
to 500,000 more students. 

This estimate is based on a 
nationwide survey by the National 
Association of College Admissions 
Counselors. The same survey 
predicts that even after additional 
students are admitted by the end of 
the summer, there will continue to 
be openings in September for 
175,000 freshmen and 125,000 
transfer students. 

A separate survey by the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools found this 
month that 87 per cent of the 
colleges and universities in the 
United States still had openings. 
"There is absolutely no reason, 
even at this late date, why anyone 
capable of going to college should 
not be able to find a number of 
institutions ready and willing to 
accept him or her," said Dr. 
Robert Kirkwood, executive 
secretary of the Middle States 
Association, a regional accrediting 
agency. 

Several Reasons Cited 
Factors generally cited by ad- 
missions officials for the unusually 

large member of openings are 



economic conditions, cnanges in 
the draft law that make it no longer 
necessary to attend college to 
avoid military service, growing 
doubts about the value of a college 
degree and the breaking of the 
"lockstep," or regular attendance 
sequence. 

It is becoming ever more 
common for students to move 
freely in and out of the educational 
process by delaying college en- 
trance after high school and by 
taking leave while in college. 

Another element mentioned, 
particularly in connection with 
openings at four-year colleges, is 
the enlarged role that has been 
assumed by two-year, public 
community colleges, which this 
year are expected to enroll almost 
40 per cent of the new students. 

Even though the number of 
openings at this late date is 
believed to be a record high, the 
situation is not universal. Least 
likely to have openings remaining 
are the most prestigious, most 
sought-after schools such as 
Harvard, Yale and others in the 
Ivy League. 

And at UMass 

Here at UMass, Robert J. 

Doolan, Associate Director of 

Admissions, spoke about this 

situation, stating that out of a 



possible 3600 openings for the fall 
semester only 3500 incoming fresh- 
men are expected. While the dif- 
ference is a mere 100 students, 
keep in mind that about 12,000 
applications were received, 
meaning that either not as many 
students are being admitted, or 
that many students have decided 
not to attend the University. Ac- 
cording to Mr. Doolan, "the 
University is not as close to the 
high school student as in earlier 
years. There are too many 
students to reaclT'on as personal a 
level as we'd like to." 

"Times change, and it all comes 
back to the buck, tuition has gone 
up. High school graduates are 
more independent. They're not so 
concerned with college now. Kids 
coming out of high schoolare taking 
their time, because they know they 
can." He also felt that people today 
can learn just as much outside of 
the University as they can inside. 
And that's exactly what young 
people are doing today, said 
Doolan, experiencing life, before 
committing themselves to an 
academic atmosphere. 

"The college graduate is no 
longer assured of a great career 
with a degree. This fact is an 
important consideration among 
students contemplating college. 



You have to be optimistic about 
these things. Times change. We 
have to adapt. This fall the 
situation involving low freshmen 
enrollment is occurring in many 
places. All the universities in the 
five-state area are experiencing 
the same thing. I think kids today 
are taking the chance at doing 
what they want, and making it 
work. However, there is no reason 
to assume that a trend is being 
established," he further stated. 
And as people are becoming 



more sophisticated and con- 
temporary, Doolan indicated that 
the colleges will attract only those 
who feel that it is worth the effort to 
run the gamut of degree-earning. 
As Doolan said, "We can't do as 
much as we want to in educating 
students. We need funds, we need 
communication with the high 
schools, and we need a more 
realistic image. Good or bad, 
things will be different for us; as 
things are now.. ..I can't predict." 



CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED 



FOR SALE 



+m 



Thunderbird, (Ford) '67, 
Landau 4-dr. at/ps/pb, powr 
wndws. New exhaust many 
other features, excel, cond. 
$1250. Call 532-9309 (Holyoke). 



jn 



You get results with our Classifieds 

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50° each insertion 

Client — 



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Please Insert one character, space, or punctuation mark per box. 



1964 Chevrolet Impala Con- 
vertible, good condition, contact 
Larry at 549-6676 or leave 
message at Crier office. 

1971 Ford Torino Squire Station 
Wagon V-8, power brakes, 
power steering, gray gold — 
3,000 miles. Best Offer. Call 
253 5641. 

8/15 

1969 MGB low mileage; 6 radial 
tires; AM radio; overdrive; 
reasonable offers only; call 
after 8:30 p.m. nightly or 
anytime on weekends; 253-7464. 

8/1 

Used bicycles — one speed and 
three speed English. Fine 
condition. $5 $15. 427 No. 
Pleasant St. Apt. 105, University 
Apartments around supper time 
best. 

_ _ 7/20 

22" Black & White TV $45., 21" 
Color TV $150. TELEVISION 
CENTER, 55 North Pleasant St. 
Amherst, 2nd Floor, #253-5100. 

8/15 

Nikon F Hard Leather case. 
Like New $15. Call Gib at 549- 
6087. 

7/21 
FOR RENT 



GRAD student seeks to share 2 
bedroom Clnial Vlg. apt. now 
through school yr. 253-2094. Also 
wish to buy used TV and stereo. 
7/20 

ENTERTAINMENT 

DOUBLE FEATURE 
"DRACULA" STARRING 
BELA LUGUSI PLUS " KISS 
OF THE VAMPIRE" IN 
COLOR, FRIDAY JULY 21, 
8:30 p.m AMHERST 

FOLKLORE CENTRE. 

(BEHIND THE LORD JEFF). 

7/20 



tm 



Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $185/Mincl utilities. Call 
Resident Mgr 665-4239, if no 
answer 1-786-0500. 

8/15 

PERSONAL 

FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207-T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 
8/15 

Wm., 21, desperate for cash. 
Will do most anything for 
money. And I mean anything. 
Write and make a request: 
Boxholder — Po. Box 460 — 
Amherst. 

7/25 

NOTICES 

Christians — prayer meeting 
Mon — Fri., 12:30 — 1:00 p.m. 
177 CC. Everyone welcome. 

7/20 

GAYS, wishing to meet others, 
come to 911 CCtonite (Thurs.) at 
7:30 or call Student Homophile 
League 5-0154. 

8/20 



You are most welcomed to come 
every Tuesday at 7 p.m. for an 
informal gathering of The 
Christian Science College 
Organization. Hear how Truth 
and Love unfold good for all. 
Campus Center 809. 

8/15 

AVOID an automotive RIP- 
OFF. No charge for estimates 
on repairs. All work guaranteed, 
at Spencer's Mobil 161 N. 
Pleasant St. (next to P.O.) 253- 
9050. 



HELPWANTED 



Psych study female cycle 
woman, age 20 - 30, non pill user, 
$2/hr., approx 10 hr., over 
period 2 mos. Call Mon. - Fri. 8 - 
12 542-2354. 

7/20 



CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED 



Metric Problems Appear 

■ 

rleproeramming the American consumer to buy passed by Congress no later than the next session," 

Prof. Kroner said. "It therefore would not be too 



New Dictionary Offered 



cloth by the meter, nails by the kilo and beer by the 
liter is only one part of the changeover problem that 
will face this country when and if the metric system is 
adopted here. 

But the average person's adjustments will be 
simple compared to the metric conversion problems 
of industry, according to UMass Professor Klaus E. 
Kroner, who is already moving to help Massachusetts 
industry deal with these problems. 

Prof. Kroner, an engineer whose European 



Designed for the general reader 
as well as the writer and student, 
Dictionary of Literary Terms by 
Harry Shaw (McGraw-Hill, 
$12.50), is one of the most com- 
prehensive guides of its kind. With 



wealth of 2,000 entries from a 



early for trade associations and industrial firms to 
begin to develop plans which would provide for an 
efficient changeover at lowest cost." 

The major impetus for the change comes from the 
1971 report of the U.S. Metric Study, which concluded 

that the time has come for the U.S. to join the other and references that are likel y to be 
industrial countries in an international system of 
measurements. Even Great Britain, where most of 
our present units of measurement come from, is 



encountered in virtually every kind 
of literature, including magazines, 
newspapers, and works not often 
found in print, such as films, plays, 
and speeches. 

While most reliable dictionaries 
offer facts but rarely full ex- 
planations or examples, this 416- 



wide variety of separate and in- page volume enhances its succinct 
terrelated disciplines, it defines, dictionary definitions with ex- 
explains, and illustrates all terms planations, interpretations, and 

illustrations. 



background gives him first-hand knowledge of the making the switch, and plans to complete the metric 
metric system, is forming a faculty resource group at conversion by 1975. 



UMass, bringing together all those faculty members 
who have the experience and know-how to cope with 
problems that may arise with a changeover to the 
metric system. He envisions it as an interdisciplinary 
group encompassing not only engineering, but also 
the sciences, management and other fields. 

"The cha«ces appear fairly good that some kind of 
legislation calling tor a resolute plan for this country 
to convert to dominately metric unit usage will be 



Two bills that are an outgrowth of the 1971 metric 
study report are now before Congress. Basically they 
call for an orderly, well-planned, voluntary con- 
version period spread over 10 years. 

In the metric system, all units have a uniform scale 
of relations based on the decimal system. 

Any Massachusetts firm desiring assistance in 
metrication problems may write Prof. Klaus Kroner. 
Department of Industrial Engineering and 
Operations Research, UMass Amherst, 01002. 



Crossword Puzzle 



Mnswers to Last Issue's Puzzle 



Inside The Astrology 



Natalie 
on our 



Natalie 
on our 
curves 



By Madeleine Monnet 

STELLAR PROFILE: 

NATALIE WOOD 

The "Moon child" label fits 
Wood as perfectly as anyone 
contemporary 
en 

The "Moon child" label fits 
Wood as perfectly as anyone 
contemporary scene. Gentle 
combined with soft sensual empathizing 
qualify he' - for s'ar trekking in any eager 
astronaut's rocket or spy's trenchcoat 
scene. 

Robert Wagner appears to have again 
picked Natalieup on his radar screen and 
there are odds on a rematch. These two 
do not fit the traditional astrologic mating 
pattern, but there's plenty of planetary 
sizzle between their charts. Bob is an 
Aquarian, Natali' 1 is a Cancer, both are 
far above the average of their signs. 

Born July 20. Natalie took her first bow 
in the full heat of summer. Mars con 
tacting her sun adds up to "Fire on the 
Moon." That smoldering ycu feel beneath 
the silvery patina is potently real. There 
is no question that kitten can transform 
from an adorable house pet into a full 
fledged lioness 

Natalie is potent and the screen's 
sensitive celluloid is iaeal for revealing 
the various nuances of her personality 
Small wonder she's been registering 
effectively on audiences since aae 4. 

Natalie's father designed sets for 
motion picture -^tu'tios. Her mother is .=. 
former ballerina They migrated fron 
Russia. Beauty, talent and entree, plu . 
"climbing on the right lap. namely movie 
director Irving Pichel's, landed Natash 
Gurdin in an early career. 

"Tomorrow Is Forever," starring 
Orson Welles and Claudette Colbert, 
established Natalie as a Sl,000aweek 
child actress. ""She was so good," Welles 
remarked, "she frightened me." 

"I wasn't a child star like Liz Taylor," 
Natalie recalls those early days, "but I've 
never known any other life. If I missed 
the fun of growing up, I didn't know about 
it." Actor Gene Kelly referred to her as 
"The teen ager's teen ager, the girl they 
all identify with." 

Natalie's planet patterns reveal a 
superabundance of talent, backed up by a 
qenerous, beautiful personality. Sooner 
or later the critics had to tumble. "West 
Side Story" marked a major plateau in 
Natalie's career 

A New York Times editorial summed it 
up thusly: "Miss Wood has a beauty and 
radiance that carry her through a role of 
violent passions and depressions with 
unsullied purity and strength. There's 
poetry in her performance " 

Here is the "mystic" that is Natalie She 
looks too shy, too sweet with her Cancer 
Taurus blend to be able to deeply register 
passions, but underneath a volcano waits. 
Some of Hollywood and the jet set's 
most desirable men have responded to 
her appeal Natalie's romance and 
marriage to Robert Wagner was one of 
the most highlv publicized Hollywood has 
launched The Can^erian firecracker and 
this intellectual Aqjarian didn't quite 
make the grade. 

Wagner's chart went sour some 10 
years back when his planet of love got off 
the track. Success came big and sudden 
for Bob. There's a harem side of Aquarius 
that can't say "no". Wagner shows every 
heavenly factor needed for pulling down 
adjectives such as "irresistible," but 
that's to every girl, and Natalie's 
planetary blend shows potentials for 
towering fits of jealousy. 

lhe heavens also reveal she once had 
the bolt of lightning kind of love for Bob, 
not readily forgotten. His Moon is in her 
Sun sign, she fits his image of the girl he 
thinks of as perfect for him. 

A potent Venus force is building this 
summer, but it's not for a frivolous It 
does triqger both their charts favorably 
and could rekindle the old flame Whether 
Natalie can permanently fit the fire side 
slipper scene with Wagner is moot 
question. But thin permnnent happiness 
is somethinq we work for it doesn't just 
happen 

Indications are Bob and Natalie are 
ready for an enduring relationship, but it 
won't come easy and more heartaches 
are pending if they haven't matured 
sufficiently. 

STAR TRENDS: Tighten the reins on 
travel plans, if piloting your own vehicle, 
double check tor defects Private and 
public discord can erupt, but should be 
quickly subdued. Progressive planning 
by both the Democrats and Republicans 
notos the spotlight. 
STELLAR SUCCESS GUIDE: 

ARIES: (Mar. 21 Apr. 4) Stow your 
enthusiasm for spending what's only on 
paper, get back to cash and carry pon 
ciples. (Apr. 5 19) Romance plays a 
mystical melody, but read the small 
print. 

TAURUS: (Apr 20 May 5) Times are 
still prone to be promising, stay with the 
stable performers for best results. (May 
6 20) Double check the purchase and/or 
operations of all things mechanical. 

GEMINI: (May 21 June 6) Your mode 
of action should be serious with a sharp 
eye out for new techniques. (June 7- 1) 
Don't be surprised if you fall in love with 
a tradition or an ancient holy place. 
CANCER (June 22 July 7— Get ready 



to spread your wings as one of life's 
major adventures comes full circle to 
bring you happiness. (July 8-22— You 
can't go far afield by staying with 
tradition, try to blend the best from the 
old and new ways 

LEO: (July 23 Aug. 7) You will 
energize with computer like perfection in 
many directions this year. Strength in 
harmony is your keynote as you lav the 
foundation for a structure that casts a 
long shadow (Aug. 8 22) Lady Luck gives 
you one of her superlative glances. If it's 
this good without trying, think what a 
little extra effort can pull. 

VIRGO: (Aug. 23 Sept. 7) Coast and let 
the summer breezes please your ear, 
your time is coming. (Sept. 8-22) Stay 
away from the lime light as personal 
relations may get too hot to handle. 

LIBRA: (Sept. 23 Oct. 7) Plan summer 
"festives" that please others while fur- 
thering your goals (Oct. 8 22) An unusual 
romance seems more than likely, swing 
cut with beautiful accord. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 Nov 7) Letting ge 
v/ith both barrels is still risky at best; 
circumvent the "ego' of those in power 
(Nov 8 22) If you're not careful the 
confusion of your own errors in 
judgement can bury you. 

SAGGITARIUS: (Nov. 23 Dec 7) Your 
follow up should be smooth now as you 
work out any defects in proper planning. 
(Dec. 8 22) Progressiva mind magic 
overcomes all obstacles. _^^___ 



CAPRICORN (Dec 22 Jan. 5) Try a 
diet and plenty of exercise for better iooks 
and sleek mental processes. (Jan. 6 19) 
Tune in on the off beat rhythm of change 
if you would blend with the future. 

AQUARIUS: (jan. 20 Feb 3) Stay out 
of crowded places and enjoy your for 
tunate spot : n the sun in quietude. (Feb 4 
18) If assistance of the proper type is 
offered, stow foolish pride and get in step. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 Mar. 7) Avoid 
overindulgence of a dangerous nature, 
don't accept imitations when the real 
thing is so close at hand. (Mar. 8 20) 
Petulance is not becoming to young or 
old; be a good sport and make peace. 

(Copyright, 1972, by United Feature 
Syndicate, Inc 



Yes, do send in your comments 
on campus life, international af- 
fairs, national emergencies, etc. 
All we demand is that all letters to- 
thc-editor be typed on a sixty-space 
line, one side of each page, double 
spaced. 



ACROSS 

1 Paradise 
5 Peruse 
9 Timid 

12 Rockfish 

13 Healthy 

14 Spread for 
drying 

15 Rupees (abbr.) 

16 Profit 
18 Armed 

,, conflict 
20' Credit (abbr.) 
22 Break 

suddenly 
24 East Indian 

palm 
27 Lifeless 
29 Quarrel 

31 Knave at cards 

32 City in Italy 
34 Wife of 

Geraint 

36 Note of scale 

37 Models 
39 Surgical saw 

41 A continent 
(abbr.) 

42 Conduct 

44 African 
antelope 

45 Goal 
47 Ventilates 

49 God of love 

50 Antlered 
animal 

52 Son of Adam 

54 Note of scale 

55 Decay 
57 Entreaty 
59 Symbol for 

gold 
61 Toll 

63 Son of Adam 
65 Agreement 

67 Total 

68 Tableland 

69 Comfort 



5 Part of leg (pi.) 

6 Appetizer 

7 Man's 
nickname 

8 Recent 

9 Denude 

10 Pronoun 

11 Distance 
measure 
(abbr.) 

17 Conjunction 
19 Indefinite 

article 
21 Demolish 
23 Gasp for 

breath 

25 Mental cases 

26 Repeals 

27 Platforms 

28 Face of watch 
30 Weary 

33 Genus of olives 
35 Erase 

(printing) 
38 Levantine 

vessel . 



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40 Separate 


56 


Sunburn 


43 Arranges in 


58 


Simian 


folds 


60 


Southwestern 


46 Challenged 




Indian 


48 Part of 


61 


Note of scale 


window frame 


62 


Man's 


(pl) 




nickname 


51 Proceed 


64 


Exist 


53 Compass point 


66 


Cooled lava 




Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1972 



Theatre — Highlights 



T.V. 



MOVIES 

"Kiss of the Vampire" 8:30 p.m., 
Fri., July 21 

July 20: 9.00 "Cities of the Poor-Part 
I"; 10:15 p.m. "Cities of the Poor 
Part II"; 11:30 p.m. "How Things 
Get Done". Campus Center Room 
162, admission free. 
July 21: 9:00 "Troubled Cities", 
10:15 p.m. "Cities-The Rise of New 
Towns"; 11:30p.m. "Private Dream 
Public Nightmare", Campus Center 
Room 162, admission free. 

PLAYS AND MUSICALS 
Arena Civic Theatre, Greenfield 
(phone 773 , 991) 

"Happy Birthday Wanda June" 
July 20, 21, 27, 29 

Mount Holyoke College, South 
Hadley (phone 538-2406) 

"Any Wednesday" July 18-22. 
Curtain time 8:30. 

Storrowton Musical Theatre West 
Springfield (phone 732 1105) 

"This Was Burlesque" runs the 
week of July 17 

Williamstown Summer Theatre, 
Williamstown (phone 458 8146) 

"Arturo Ui" July 18 22 
Music Theatre Workshop, 170 Elm 
Street, Holyoke (phone 788 0258) 

"Annie Get Your Gun" July 19-22. 
Curtain time 8 p.m. 

Williston Northampton School, 
Easthampton (phone 527 1520) 

"The Emperor's New Clothes" 
July 19, 21, 22, "The Prime of Miss 
Jean Brodie", July 19, 20, 21, 22. 

OUT-OF-STATE 
NEW YORK 
New York City 

NY Shakespeare Festival, Central 
Park, July 20 Aug. 5: Ti Jean and His 



Brothers, a new play written by 
Derek Walcott. 

Hunter Summer Repertory 
Theater, Hunter College, Brecht on 
Brecht, July 20 22. 
Albany 

State University Summer Theatre, 
"Oh, What A Lovely War" July 19 22. 

Lake George Village, Towers Hall 
Playhouse, July 19 22, "Last of the 
Red Hot Lovers" 
CONNECTICUT 
Ivoryton 

"Dial M for Murder" with Joan 
Fontaine, July 17-22. 
Southbury 

"Play It Again, Sam", July 18 22 
Storrs 

"How to Succeed in Business", July 
18 22. 
Stratford 

The American Shakespeare 
Festival Theater, "Anthony and 
Cleopatra", July 18, 22; "Julius 
Caesar", July 19, 20; "Major Bar 
bara", July 21. 
RHODE ISLAND 
Providence 

Brown University Summer 
Theater in Faunce House Arena 
Theater, "Dial M for Murder", July 
1923 

DANCE 

UMass Summer Dance Program 

The Chuck Davis Dance Co., 
Bowker Aud., 8 p.m. July 20 
Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, 
Becket (phone243-0745) 

First Chamber Dance Co.: Frank 
Bays, Charles Bennet, Dara DeLuis, 
Janice Gronab, Flemming Halby, 
Carolyn Muchmor, Marjorie 
Mussman, Gerard Sibbritt July 18 
22 



MUSIC 

Tanglewood, Lenox (phone 637 1600) 

July 21: 7 p.m. Weekend Prelude, 
Earl Wild conducts; 9 p.m. Bruno 
Maderna conducts; 
Gabriel/Maderna: Motet Stravin- 
sky: Concerto for piano and winds; 
Earl Wild conducts; Brahms: 
Symphony No. 1 

July 22: 10:30 a.m. Open 
Rehearsal; 8:30 p.m. Leonard 
Bernstein conducts: Brahms 
Program; Symphony No. 4 and 
Symphony No. 2 

July 23: Karel Ancerl conducts; 
Gluck: Overture to "Iphigeniath in 
Aulis'VVejvanovsky: Sonata a7 and 
Sonata alO/Schumann: Piano 
Concerto; Alicia DeLarrocha con 
ducts Dvorak: Symphony No. 8 
Music at Stratford, Stratford, Conn. 
(Avon Theatre) 

July 23: 2 p.m. Rudolf Firkusny, 
pianist, Schubert/Sonata in A minor, 
Opusl43,Schumann/- 
Davidsbundlertanze, Opus 6, 
Debussy /Three Etudes, 
Smetana/The Shepherdress, Mac- 
beth and the Witches 

TV HIGHLIGHTS 

Thursday 

9:00 p.m. MOVIE: "The Comic" (3, 
7, 10) Comedy with Dick Van Dyke, 
Mickey Rooney and Steve Allen. 

9:00 p.m. THIS CHILD OF OURS: 
IN OUR FOOTSTEPS (5) A look at 
life in New England as a child grows 
from birth to 12. 
Friday 

7:30 p.m. BASEBALL (18) Angels 
vs. the Yankees. 

8:30 O.m. MOVIE: "Far From the 
Madding Crowd" (4, 20, 22, 30) 



Excellent drama starring Julie 
Christie based on Thomas Hardy's 
novel. 

8:30 p.m. SPACE BETWEEN 
WORDS (24) Documentary on the 
administration's position on 
desegration. 

8:30p.m. EVENING AT POPS (57) 
Featuring Roberta Flack. 

9:00p.m. ELIZABETH R (3) Part 3 
in the series. Excellent viewing. 

9:30 p.nv. DEVOUT YOUNG (24) 
The Jesus movement is explored via 
its Buddhist influences. 

Saturday 

12:00 noon Roller Game of the Week 

(27) 

12:30 p.m. BASEBALL (18) Angels 

vs. Yankees 

1:55 p.m. Red Sox Warm up (4) 

2: 15 p.m. BASEBALL (4, 20, 22, 30) 
Athletics vs. Red Sox 

3:30 p.m. Auto Race (18) The 
Michigan 200 

4:00 p.m. Golf Tournament (8, 40) 
Round three of the American Golf 
Classic. 

4:30 p.m. Racing (27) Rockingham 

5:00 p.m. Wide World of Sports (5, 8, 
40) Stock Car Racing and Highlights 
of World Champion Chess in Reyk- 
javik. 

5:00 p.m. MOVIE: "Attack of the 
Mushroom People" (10) 

8:00 p.m. MOVIE: "Day of the Evil 
Gun" (5, 8, 40) Glenn Ford stars in a 
poor western. 

9:00 p.m. MOVIE: "Far From the 
Madding Crowd" (4, 20, 22, 30) 
Second part of an excellent movie. 

9:00p.m. BOXING ( 27) - Sugar Ray 

Ramos vs. Caesar Sinda. 



Suntan Products Ineffective 



In working cooperatively with the Food and Drug 
Administration and the Federal Trade Commission, 
the Consumer Protection Division often forwards 
complaints to these agencies about particular 
consumer products. With the onset of summer, and 
in light of a million-dollar market in suntan lotions, 
sunbathers everywhere are asking about the ef- 
fectiveness of such products. 

Contrary to Madison Avenue hyperbole, no suntan 
lotion can help you to tan faster than you normally 
would or affect the final shade or evenness of your 
tan. 



What most sun-worshippers fail to recognize is that 
the ultra-violent rays of the suntan and burn at the 
same time. Arising from this misunderstanding are a 
number of myths about suntan. 

A red burn will not convert to tan. It will simply 
fade away, allowing the tan you received at that time 
to show through You don't burn faster on hazy days- 
you are simply not as aware of the conditions that 
cause burn on a sunless day. Dark-skinned people are 
not immune to burning, though they are generally 
considered the least likely victims. 

How does suntan lotion affect this Suntan lotion 
may help screen out some of the sun's ultra-violet 
rays, depending upon the quality ot the product. 
However, many lotions engage in fraudulent or 



misleading advertising. Specific complaints received 
by the FDA include the following: 

BABY OIL: advertised to promote tanning but 
having a negligible screening effect. 

AEROSOL LOTIONS: considered dangerous 
because of their packaging. They will explode upon 
reaching temperatures of 120 F, not unlikely in an 
auto trunk or glove compartment. 

STAINING : studies show that a significant portion 
of all tanning products stain cotton terry cloth, nylon, 
orlon and spandex-all commonly used in sportswear. 

Claim of "EXTRA FAMOUS SUNSCREEN" 
ingredient: These mystical components often do 
absolutely no screening. In fact, one company 
produces 2 types of lotion: with sunscreen and 
without. Studies by a well-known consumer group 
proved that no difference exists between the two. 

Claim of protection from "HARMFUL RAYS": 
Some manufacturers say that their lotions screen out 
harmful" rays, allowing beneficial rays of the sun to 
tan. No product is capable of doing this. Harmful and 
beneficial rays are one and the same Unfortunately, 
no one has been able to separate their burning and 
tanning effects. 

Remember finally that a number of substances can 
cause skin to be more susceptible to burning, perhaps 
oven resulting in skin cancer. These include: certain 
medications, perfumes and antiseptics found in some 
deoderant soaps, talcums and shampoos 



Giver Franchising Bill Diluted 



BOSTON-A hill, initially in- 
troduced by State Representative 
John W. oiver. that helps protect 
'line station franchises frorh 
needless vontrol by large oil 
companies, is awaiting the 
signature of Governor, but not 
after the bill was greatly weakened 
in the State Senate. 



The original proposal, would 
protect the independent dealer 
from incomplete lease in- 
formation, forced use of certain 
products, dictated hours of 
opening, short term leases, used by 
oil companies as devices of control, 
and would have provided the oil 
dealers with a collective 
bargaining agent. 

The strong version passed the 
House, at Rep. Olver's urgings, 
despite strong opposition from the 
oil company lobbyists. However, 
the lobby introduced changes to the 
original in the Senate, and obtained 
passage of the revision, late in the 
») '»i\e session This f^eed the 
I r e into the posi'ion J »ithcr 

(*r>t.'fl4 t^W' i v -.'»"" ft r" ■"' • 

bill *\. u' 



The main changes involve the 
provisions for renewal of lease In 
the original bill, renewals would be 
automatic, unless the oil company 
goes to court under specific 
grounds. 

The redrafting alters these 
conditions so that the gas dealer 
must prove all disputes with the 
companies in legal terms that are 
most difficult to prove in court. 

This softened revision was 
termed "disappointing" by Rep. 
Olver. He said, "We had passed in 
the House a bill that would have 
struck a blow for small, in- 
dependent businessmen all over 
the state. It protected, specifically, 
gas franchises, from many abuses 
such as lease manipulation, and 
unclear dictates of hours, 
products, and other everyday 
dealings, that should be left to the 
dealer. 

"Unfortunately, the enacted 
vision greatly reduces the en- 
fc-'emerU potential of the original 
"•" • ■<« I am at least 



Resigns 



Sunday 

12:00 noon MOVIE: "Pillow Talk" 
(4) Excellent 1959 comedy starring 
Doris Day and Rock Hudson. 
12:00 noon MOVIE: "To Catch a 
Thief" (7) An Alfred Hitchcock 
directed musical starring Cary Grant 
and Grace Kelly. Rated "Good" in 
1955. 

12:00 noon AAU International 
Champions (10) Water Sports 
12:00 noon The Prado (22) Special 
on Madrid's Museo del Prado con 
centrating on the surrealist works of 
El Greco. 

1:30 p.m. Tennis (10) • CBS Classic, 
Rosewall vs. Emerson. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL (4, 22) - 
Athletics vs. Red Sox 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL (18, 20) - 
Angels vs. Yankees 

3:00 p.m. AAU Champions (3, 7) - 
Volleyball, track and field events. 

3:30 p.m. MOVIE: "Private Eyes" 
(27) - Bowery Boys 

4:00 p.m. Golf (8, 40) Round 4 of 
the American Golf Classic 

4:00 p.m. BASEBALL (10) - Mets vs. 
Giants 

4:30 p.m. Tennis (3, 7) Roger 
Taylor vs. Tom Okker 

4:30 p.m. Swan Lake (24) 1967 
production of the Tchaikovsky 
classic. 

9:00 p.m. MOVIE: "Lord Jim" (5,8, 
40) Stars Peter O'Toole 
Monday 

8:00 p.m. ABC News Inquiry (5, 8, 
40) Special on the American Indian 

10:00 p.m. Suspense Playhouse (3, 7, 

10) "Higher and Higher Attorneys 

at Lau" stars Dustin Hoffman and 

Sally Kelle' r man. 



RVN Today 



somewhat pleased we got 
something through this session, 
and hopefully, in the future, 
strengthening amendments can be 
added." 

Rep. Olver is a second term State 
Representative from the Second 
Hampshire District. A candidate 
for State Senate, he resides in 
Amherst. 

Finnish Gvt. 



SAIGON-Enemy infantrymen 
and tanks attacked in Quang fri on 
Wednesday but failed to halt a 
steady South Vietnamese 
paratrooper advance toward the 
provincial capital's old walled 
Citadel. 

By late afternoon some airborne 
units were reported within 50 yards 
of the 19th century fortress, which 
bristles with North Vietnamese 
gun emplacements. 

A midnight artillery barrage of 
more than 300 rounds preceded a 
ground attack by 10 tanks and an 
estimated battalion of North 
Vietnamese infantrymen. 

House-to-house fighting raged 
until dawn in the southern sector of 
the city Associated Press 
correspondent Michael Putzel said 
South Vietnamese artillery fire 
finally repelled the attackers and 
the Worth Vietnamese tanks 
retreated westward across the 
Thach Han Iliver. 

North Vietnamese losses in this 
and other battles on the Quang Tn 
front were listed as 295 killed three 
captured and two tanks destroyed. 
Government casualties for the da> 
were 27 killed and 131 wounded, 
according to a communique issued 
in Hue. 

The Communist command is 
believed to have committed a 
sizable tank force to the defense of 
Quang Tri. South Vietnamese 
claim to have knocked out 

Jiore than 100 enemy tanks since 
une 28. 

Putzel said the North Viet- 
namese have mounted recoil less 
rifles, machine guns and an- 



tiaircraft artillery on the Citadel 
walls. South Vietnamese jets 
bombing enemy positions in Quang 
Tri are taking heavy fire from 
these emplacements. 

Allied commanders have ex- 
pressed growing concern that the 
North Vietnamese might try to cut 
Highway 1 behind the advancing 
South Vietnamese troops, trapping 
them without supplies inside 
Quang Tri. 

More than 320 U.S. Air Force, 
Navy and Marine fight-bombers 
swept across North Vietnam on 
Tuesday, wrecking warehouses, 
cutting runways at MIG air bases, 
dropping bridges and leaving fuel 
depots in flames. Fire balls shot 
4,000 feet into the air, spokesmen 
said. 



The ' ;gest strike of the day was 

the fin -aid of the war against the 

Nguyei. Kl military complex, a 

nine miles north of 

forth Vietnamese 

capil . 

The) i * . riaied the complex held 
about th t> million gallons of fuel 
ano most of it was set on fire. 
Reconna isance photographs 
taken after the strike showed fires 
still burning. 

The complex-a major tran- 
sshipment point for war materials- 
is located at the junction of North 
Vietnam's two major rail net- 
works, the northwest and northeast 
lines that run to the Chinese bor- 
der. Several railroad spurs were 
cut, making the transshipment of 
supplies more difficult, the 
spokesmen reported. 



HELSINKI Finland's minority 
government resigned today in a 
surprise move by the Social 
Democratic administration of 
Prime Minister Rafael Paasio. 

The Social Democrats decided 
they could not alone take the 
responsibility of signing the free 
trade agreement with the 
European Common Market. 

The resigning government 
declared that "only a majority 
government can take the 
responsibility of signing the trade 
agreement with the European 
Common Market." 



Wallace Undergoes Surgery 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Gov. George C. Wallace underwent surgery 
today at University Hospital to improve the drainage of an abscess in his 
abdomen. 

"All went well," a physician said. 

There werS no complications, he said, during the 55-minute operation, 
and Wallace returned to his room in a rehabilitation center. 

The surgery was a continuation of treatment begun by the governor's 
doctors in Maryland. A hospital spokesman said it was not unexpected. 

The governor has been undergoing physical therapy treatment at Spain 
Rehabilitation Center. He was paralyzed in both legs from bullet wounds 
suffered in a May 15 assassination attempt in Laurel, Md. 




July 25, 1972 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume I, Issue 8 



"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Pats Cut , Nance Goes 



There is news all over the place for the assignment. Perhaps the 
from the New England Patriots, most difficult position on the field. 



The promised heads did roll 
yesterday in the wake of Satur- 
day's first intersquad scrimmage. , 
There were some surprises among 
the cuts, four of whom started at 
one time or another in a game last 
year. Nine players were placed on 
waivers in all, following the im- , 
pressive first scrimmage. They 
are: wide receiver Eric Crabtree, 
tight end Roland Moss, corner 
back Randy Beverly, and 
linebacker Dennis Coleman, all 
veterans; and rookies Jerry 
Murtaugh, a linebacker from 
Nebraska; Henry Adolphi, a 
linebacker from Amherst, Joe 
Leslie, an offensive tackle from 
Dartmouth; Mike Mikolayunas, a 
running back from Davidson, and 
Gary Christensen, an offensive 
tackle from Tulsa. 

The release of Crabtree is an 
indication of how much the 
Patriots have improved their wide 
receiver corps. A year ago, such 
immortal names as Gayle Knief, 
Bill Rademacher, Bake Turner, 
and Eric Stalberg were prime 
candidates for the position. This 
year, with the return of former free 
agents Randy Vataha, Hubie 
Bryant, and Reggie Rucker, as 
well as top draft choice Tom 
Reynolds and last year's 13th pick, 
Al Sykes, Crabtree, who came to 
the team as a free agent partway 
through last season, is expendable. 
He and the others cut were placed 
on the waiver wires at four p.m. 
yesterday. It is likely that he will 
be claimed, setting up a possible 
trade with another NFL team. 

Moss, who shared the starting 
tight end spot with Tom Beer last 
year, is the first tight end to go. 
The others, Beer, and rookies 
Sonny Person. John Nelson, and 
Clark Hoss, are still in competition 



the price for a tight end in a trade 
would be steep, probably too steep, 
and it is doubtful there will be a 
deal for one. As for Moss, whether 
he will be picked up or not is un- 
clear. 

Perhaps the biggest story of the 
week is the departure of Jim 
Nance. Nance, who left camp 
Friday night, was excused from 
Saturday's scrimmage. The trade, 
which will send him to another 
team (my guess is Philadelphia), 
is being worked out. Nance agreed 
to take a pay cut to go somewhere 
else, and his lawyers are currently 
negotiating the new figure with the 
new team. It has been no secret 
that Nance wanted out. The 
coaches are satisfied with the crop 
of running backs in camp, and the 
offense is no longer geared to Big 
Jim. He wants to carry the ball 35 
times a game, and with Jim 
Plunkett at quarterback, no 
Patriot figures to carry the ball 
that often. Whether the Patriots 
receive players or other com- 
pensation for Nance is being 
negotiated by G.M. Bell. 

On the question of Mike 
Taliaferro, Bell said there would 
be an announcement soon. 

The final personnel changes are 
the departure of John O'Neill, a 
punter from UMass, and the return 
of veteran linebacker Ed 
Wejgacosky. O'Neil left camp last 
Wednesday morning after being 
displeased with his performance. 
Weisacosky, a starter last year, 
was coaxed out of retirement. He 
came to Amherst last Saturday, 
picked up his playbook, and 
returned to him home in Penn- 
sylvania, where his wife is un- 
dergoing surgery this week. He 
will return by the end of the week. 
With Steve Kiner a question mark 



due to his groin injury, Coach 
Mazur was anxious to have some 
experience at linebacker. He is 
very pleased that Weisacosky 
returned, although he says Ed will 
have to win a job just like everyone 
else. 



Death Penalty 
Rehearing Asked 

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Rehearings are unusual in a 
Court was asked Monday to court wnicn has granted only four 
reconsider its decision banning of five in the Past five years, ac- 
criminal executions and return 16 cording to observers, 
prisoners to death row. The court's capital punishment 

The rehearings.sought by the decision declared that the death 
attorneys-general of Georgia and penalty under most existing state 
Texas and Philadelphia District an d federal laws is un- 
Attorney Arlen Specter, would constitutional because it violates 
affect 13 once-condemned men in an amendment prohibiting "cruel 
Georgia, 2 in Pennsylvania and 2 in and unusual punishment." 
Texas if granted by the high court. The decision vacated the death 

penalty for several hundred 

The prosecutors seek to restore prisoners, 
the death penalties to the three 

prisoners directly affected by the The prosecutors argued in their 
Supreme Court decision-William petitions filed with the court clerk 
Henry Furman and Lucius that the ruling constitutes a severe 
Jackson, Jr., both of Georgia, and blow to the American jury system. 
Elmer Branch of Texas-along with Furman and Jackson were given 
the 10 others who had been death sentences at Savannah in 
awaiting execution on murder and 1968 for, respectively, murder and 
rape charges. forcible rape. 

To get the rehearings, the Attorney Specter asked 
petitioners would have to get the rehearings in the cases of Anthony 
support of five of the nine justices, Scoleri and Frank Phelan. He 
including one who voted with the described Scoleri as a pistol- 
majority in the 5-4 anti-execution whipping robber and murderer and 
decision last June 29. Phelan as a hired assassin. 



British General 
Strike Shapes Up 



Mr. Agnew Again 

When Richard M. Nixon picked Spiro T. Agnew as his Vice- 
Presidential running mate four years ago, it seemed incredible 
that a man would be chosen to stand next in line for the 
Presidency who had experience neither in national government 
nor in foreign affairs. 

His nearly four years as Vice President have done nothing to 
dissipate the public's anxieties about Mr. Agnew. He has shown 
himself to be a man without comprehension of the American 
tradition of civil liberties or the meaning of the First Amend- 
ment. As an emissary abroad, he has been a jet-propelled em- 
barrassment. To the dismay of all citizens who covet the good 
name of this democracy, Mr. Agnew has publicly and effusively 
endorsed dictators in Europe, Asia, and Africa. 

If he has learned anything about the nation's serious domestic 
problems, Mr. Agnew has kept that knowledge to himself. He 
remains the man who said in 1968, "If you've seen one slum, 
you've seen them all." Periodically, his press agents and 
political allies suggest that he has serious ideas about Federal- 
state relations and other real concerns, but those ideas-if they 
exist-remain buried under a slag heap of partisan claptrap. 

Mr Nixon's political rationale for keeping Mr. Agnew on the 
ticket is clear enough. Confronted with the prospect of con- 
servative Democratic defections from the McGovern-Eagleton 
ticket, the President feels confident enough of carrying Texas not 
to need his chief Democratic recruit, former Treasury Secretary 
John B Connelly, as his running mate. Mr. Agnew s alliterative 
nonsense is soothing to those conservative Republicans who are 
distressed by Mr. Nixon's journeys to Peking and Moscow. 

Vice President Agnew is a campaigner able and willing to take 
the Dartisan low road while Mr. Nixon remains not only above the 
battle but also beyond accountability. The decision was not 
unexpected but it is still a dismal augury for the fall campaign. 
Editor's Note: This editorial was reprintad from tha New v-., 
Timet. 



LONDON — Wildcat strikes 
spread across Britain Monday in 
protest against the jailing of five 
defiant dockers and raised the 
spectre of a total nationwide 
walkout. 

The stoppage, led by 42.000 
longshoremen, shut down the 
country's ports, idled 200 ships, 
diverted dozens overseas. 
It quickly gathered momentum. 
Pressures built up on the giant 
Trades Union Congress the TUC, 
representing 10 million organized 
workers-to call the country's first 
general strike in half a century. 
Miners left their pits. 
Printers walked out, leaving 
London without newspapers forj^he 
second straight day. 

Workers quit the capital's meat, 
fish and vegetable markets. 
Fishermen refused to unload their 
catches. 

Drivers parked their trucks up 
and down the land, warning all 
would be off the roads in two days. 
The developing crisis was a 
further blow to Britain's Con- 
servative government, already 
fighting high unemployment and 
rampant inflation while trying to 
halt turmoil in Northern Ireland. 
TUC leaders trooped into an 
emergency night conference with 
Prime Minister Edward Heath 
carrying a demand for the release 
of the hailed longshoremen. 

Significantly, they shelved until 
Wednesday consideration of in- 
sistent calls from member unions 
for a general strike. 



The longshoremen traditionally sought desperately to cool the 



have been the most radical of 
Britain's organized workers. 

As massive support built up 
across the country for the 
longshoremen, the government 



situation. This focuses on the need 
for the two sides to hit upon some 
face-saving way of having the 
jailed dockers freed. 



Final Statistics Inter- 
Squad Scrimmage 

TEAM STATISTICS 

1st Downs - 16 

Passes Att./Comp - 16/37 

Passing Yardage - 267 yds. (2 TD's) 

Rushes/Yards - 38/137 

Total Plays - 80 

Rushing Plays - 41 

Passing Plays - 37 

Field Goal Plays - 2 

INDIVIDUAL STATS 

Rushing 

Ashton - 14/36 (1 TD); Garrett - 5/27; Hardaway - 4/34; Lawson - 

4/19; Gladieux - 2/9; Campbell - 3/7; Mathews - 2/8; Mikolayunas - 

2/6; Maitland - 2/1 ; Dowling - 1/0; Goepel - 2/5. 

Passing 
Plunkett - 2 for 8 - 59 yds. - 1 TD 
Dowling - 7 for 8 - 104 yds. - 1 TD 
Goepel - 7 for 21 - 94 yds. - TD 

Pass Receiving 
Reynolds 4/81 - 1 TD; Mathews - 3/26; Vataha - 2/69 ( 1 TD) ; Sykes 
1/30; Nelson - 1/17; Maitland - 1/12; Hoss - 1/12; Rucker - 1/11; 
Gladieux - 1/10; Ashton - 1/9. 

SCORING 
6 Vataha, 49 pass from Plunkett <Gogo& Walker kick) 
6 - Gladieux, 1 run I Gogo & Walker kick) 
(> Reynolds, 51 pass from Dowling I Gogo & Walker kick ) 
3 - 42 FG by Gogo & Walker 
6 - Ashton, 3 run I Gogo & Walker kick ) 




ft 



* 
2 



% 



I 



Brian Dowling passing in Saturday's scrimmage. (Photo by Steve Schmidt) 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



The Crier is a semi weekly pub 1 cation of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Office ire located in the Campus Center, 
Student Activities Area, Unive. iity of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is en»i. ->ly responsible for the contents. No 
copy is censored by the administration before Publication. Represented for 
national advertising by National Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruck ha us, Lisa Castillo, 

Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

PERFORMING ARTS EDITOR Elleni Koch 

PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 

OCCASIONAL EDITORIAL CARTOONIST 

The Threshold of a relationship. 



Shelly Karp 



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1972 

Art Buch wald # 

Hard Year For Marriage 

Everyone knows about marriage couples and friends to see if I can 'Lets avoid name calling if we 
counselors, but very few people persuade them to resolve their p0 ss,bly can. Stanislaus said, 
know that there arealso election differences and become com- Tell me. is ther anything about 
counselors who are responsible for patible again. Most of my work is this year s political campaign that 
bringing people together during a done after the elections n V ou can agree on > 

November, but even now I have 
appointments." 

"I imagine you'll be busy this 
year." 



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Three 



presidential election year 

One of the best known is Stan- 
field Stanislaus, who has been in 
the election counseling business for 
30 years. 

He told me how he works. 
"Every presidential election year, 
hundreds of thousands of 
marriages and friendships are 
broken up because people get so 
mad at each other that they lose all 
reason. It is my job to work with 



Campus Carousel 

Editorials, Independence 

a. *. +. a 



by Tony Granite 

POETICAL EDITORIALS are 

the "in" thing at David Lipscomb 
College in Nashville. Tenn. 

Editor Dave Shepherd of the 
Babbler has decided to relieve the 
sterotyped newspaper editorials by 
using the entire editorial page to 
present editorial comment through 
poetry. 
The result has been such titles as 
My World". "Success", "Sunday 
Morning at the Saturday Night 
Speech' 1 and "Someday, 
Something." 

* * * * 

FSt FREEDOM FATAL SAYS 
KDITOR ROGERS is the headline 
of the week in the USoFla Oracle, 
over a UPI story that tells about 
the Florida State campus paper 
being forced into independent 
status. 

The editor complained that 
"FSU officials are trying to kill 
(The Flambeau) by cutting it free 



too soon." 

The action results from a Board 
of Regents agreement to let the 
newspaper publish as a non-profit, 
student-run corporation free of any 
administrative controls. The 
college president would no longer 
be the titular publisher of the 
newspaper, as provided by the 
state attorney general's recent 
ruling. 



Editor Kim Rogers, however, 
complains that she has been given 
only eight weeks to form the cor- 
poration and reorganize its staff 
and operations. The new status will 
mean a cut-off of $92,000 in student 
activity fees. 

"The plan the administration has 
dumped on us violates all tenets of 
business sense, ethics and 
decency." the Flambeua said in a 
July 12 editorial. 



* * 

WILL THE REPUBLICANS DO 
THE SAME? is the question that 
campus journalists are asking 
after a total of 206 press passes' 
were issued by the Democratic 
National Committee to members of 
college newspapers and radio 
stations. The passes entitled them 
to be seated in two sections of the 
press gallery, located behind and 
above the speakers platform at 
Miami. 



Coordinator Philip Seid of the 
Democratic National Committee's 
campus press operations said 
there were no accredited college 
press members at the 1968 con- 
vention. 

"The party wants to look 
younger, this year," he said. He 
pointed out that 630 of the 5,000 
delegates to the convention were 
under 30 years of age. 




busiest 1 ve ever 
had. There's a bitterness about this 
upcoming campaign that I haven't 
felt since Goldwater." 

"How do you operate 9 " 

"I have a couple coming now. 
Why don't you sit over there and 
watch me''" 

A middle-aged couple came into 
Stanislaus' office. The husband 
had a Nixon button in his hat. and 
the wife was wearing a skirt which 
said "Vote for McGovern." 

They sat far apart from each 
other. 

"Who would like to begin?" 
Stanislu i asked. 

The husband said. "Let the 
radical speak first." 

"I'm not a radical!" the wife 
shouted. "I want change. I want 
welfare reform and rights for 
women and I want to get out of 
Vietnam!" 

"I told you she was a commie!" 
the husband said 



The husband said, "We both 
agree Nixon isn't much, but I say 
he's better than nobody." 

The wife replied. "And I say Id 
rather have nobody." 

"You're getting nobody with 
McGovern." the husband said. 

"Please." Stanislaus said, "It's 
obvious that the election year is 
causing difficulty in your 
marriage. How do you get along in 
a non -presidential election year?" 

"All right." the wife said. "He 
spends most of his time watching 
football." 

"Which happens to be Nixon's 
favorite sport." the husband said. 

Stanislaus asked, "Do you do 
things together?" 

"We play tennis and go camping, 
and we're good at bridge," the wife 
said. 

"Well, that's 
Stanislaus said. 

"But we're not doing any of those 
things during an election year. 
How can you play bridge with 
someone who's for McGovern " 
the husband asked. 

"One more question." Stanislaus 
said. "Are you sexually com 
patible'.'" 

"Yen.'' the husband said, "you 
could say we are." 

The wife blushed. "I have no 
complaints." 

"Then there is only one thing for 
you both to do. Stay in bed until 
election day." 

"ELECTION DAY 9 " the 
husband gasped. 

"And no bumper stickers on the 
headboard." Stanislaus said. 

That will be $25 please." 



something," 



Israeli Stakes In U.S. Presidential Election 



Eliahu Sliphter, "Will Nixon Change His 
Color? Professor N. Safran Seeks to Justify 
Jewish Support of a Democratic Can- 
didate." Haaretz Eliahu Sliphter is a 
correspondent of Haaretz. 

There is a grave danger that in 1973 
President Nixon will try to impose the 
"Rogers Plan" on Israel and the present 
honeymoon between Israel and the United 
States will thus come to an end. This is the 
implication of the summaries of a research 
project that was presented recently by 
Professor Nadiv Safran of Harvard 
University to one of the important Jewish 
organizations in the United States. 

Although it is meant as a scientific 
research in so far as political analyses 
belong to the scope of science - the smell of 
the approaching election campaign 
emanates from the conclusions of the 
research. 

For twenty years it has been considered 
an incontrovertable rule that a Democratic 
president in the United States is better for 
Israel than a Republican one. 

Truman was the first to recognize Israel 
Eisenhower threatened Israel in order to 
compel her to withdraw from Sinai. The 
Democrats depend on Jewish votes - the 
Republicans know that Jews do not vote for 
them. 

These are the two arguments in the claim 
and they are so frequently reiterated in 
various workings that they conceal the third 
reason. Jews dike most ethnic groups in the 
United States) are connected historically 
with the Democratic Party. 

Hence, there are many Jewish, Italian 
and Irish activists in the Democratic Party 
and. therefore, it was also easier for Zionist 
activists to reach the White House of 
Truman. Kennedy and Johnson than that of 
Eisenhower. 

It seems that the situation has changed 
with President Nixon. Israeli leaders testify 
that in the three years of his presidency 
Israel gained more responsiveness and 
more secutiry, economic (and also political) 
aid than she did under any Democratic 
president. 

Now comes Professor Safran and warns 
that after the re-election of President Nixon 
things may change and that he (Nixon) is 
liable to impose things on Israel against her 
opinion and will. 
Three Scripts 

In the research, ordered by one of the 
rabbinical organizations in the United 
States. Professor Safran develops three 
groups of alternative "scripts" to the 
possible developments in the Arab-Israeli 
fonflict and a number of "sub-scripts" in 
each group 



Nixon is re-elected in November, 1972: (a) 
A soviet-American agreement on the Rogers 
Plan slightly revised in Israel's favor which 
Israel accepts under American pressure. 
The Middle East is divided into spheres of 
influence and Israel becomes the backbone 
of the American "sphere"; (b) There is no 
Soviet-American agreement. The war of 
attrition is resumed. The United States 
supports Israel. There is strong Israeli 
American cooperation, (c) Sadat's regime 
is replaced by a pro- American regime. The 
United States exerts pressure on Israel, and 
she accepts a slightly revised Rogers Plan. 
The United States exerts pressure on Israel, 
and she accepts a slightly revised Rogers 
Plan. The relations between Israel and the 
United States normalize; (d) The main 
American pressure is exerted on the pro- 
Western regime that supplants Sadat's. 
Egypt concedes to the minimal Israeli 
demands of 1971. The relations between 
Israel and the United States remain strong. 
A Democratic president is elected in 
iNOvember, 1972: The United States 
relinquishes the Rogers Plan. Egypt, en- 
joying Soviet support, opens a war of at- 
trition. The United States supports Israel 
with weapons and funds, (a) An escalated 
polarization develops between Egypt and 
the Soviet Union on one side and Israel and 
the United States on the other. A freeze of 
hostilities develops, a strong cooperation 
between Israel and the United States 
remains; (b) Egypt concedes to the 
minimal Israeli demands of 1971; (c) 
Sadat's regime is replaced by a pro- 
American regime. Through American 
mediation an agreement is reached on the 
basis of the minimal Israeli demands of 
1971. Israel is the fortress of American in- 
terests in the Middle East; (d) Israel 
presents demands beyond the original ones 
to the new regime in Cairo. Through 
pressure and persuasion, Washington 
manages to soften the Israeli stand, and an 
agreement is reached according to the 1971 
demands. United States-Israeli relations are 
ambivalent; (e) The United States exerts 
the main pressure on the pro-Western 
regime in Cairo. The Egyptians concede to 
the enlarged demands of Israel which 
becomes the principle fortress of the United 
States in the area. 

Tnr "war of attiitiun cxpondr . and b ring s 
about Soviet intervention in the fighting 
against Israel. The United States intends to 
extend support to Israel, warns Moscow, 
and aims at reaching a ceasefire, (a ) There 
is no ceasefire. The United States provides 
Israel with weapons and other aid. The 
United States. and the Soviet Union, fa.il to 
reach an agreement on settlement. A 



continuous freeze through which the United 
States defends Israel but also chains her 
hands: (c) A ceasefire followed by a Soviet- 
American accord on settlement in the 
Middle East. The two powers impose the 
settlement on the two sides. Israel and 
Egypt become de facto "protectorates" 
each of the state by which it is defended. 

The clear conclusion from the scripts ana 
the sub-scripts is that almost every set- 
tlement without war contributes to the 
strenghtening of Israel and the im- 
provement of her stand in the Middle East. 

Professor Safran claims that during his 
visit to Moscow, Nixon will arrive at an 
agreement with the Soviets on the basis of 
the Rogers Plan, but will impose it only 
after the elections. 

Even if this does not happen "the war of 
attrition which is certain to erupt in such a 
case - will not last throughout the years of 
the Nixon administration. Before 1977 it will 
lead to complications (which is to say, to 
escalation of Soviet intervention) or to the 
replacement of the present Egyptian regime 
by a pro- American one. 

"It appears, thus, that if Nixon is re- 
elected, the chances are one to eight that 
Israel will manage to hold onto her ground 
as she had been doing since 1967, a few more 
years until the Egyptians are compelled to 
concede to her minimal security demands." 

In comparison, Israel s relations with the 
United States under a Democratic ad- 
ministration after 1972 will be much easier, 
claims Professor Safran. "It is most 
reasonable to assume that a Democratic 
administration will relinquish the Rogers 
Plan and withdraw from any Soviet- 
American agreement on the basis of this 
plan, if it is reached (before the changing of 
presidents). If a Democratic administration 
is elected in November, there is a one-to-one 
chance that Israel will manage to hold onto 
her grounds without bigger problems than 
she had since 1967, until the Egyptians 
concede to accept her minimal demands," 
states Professor Safran. 

The translation of political evaluations to 
numbers is one of the fashions making roots 
in the social sciences in recent years. The 
drawing of numerical conclusions from the 
summation of alternative scripts, as does 
Professor Safran stirs many doubts. 

But the main M uesiiou mams about the 
report arise, less from the thinking exercise 
than in relation to the basic assumptions - 
these on which Professor Safran bases his 
study and those which he ignores. 
The Weaknesses of the Claim 

He establishes, without proving lor in- 
stance', that a Democratic 'administration 



will give up the Rogers Plan. If the 
reference is to the substance of the plan and 
not to the name of the Republican foreign 
minister, it is possible to claim the opposite 
with the same degree of reasonableness. 

A Democratic administration will be 
happy to exert pressure on Israel in the 
.ame of a plan suggested by a Republican 
administration since the basic principles of 
the Rogers Plan are not much different, in 
fact, from the attitude of the Johnson ad 
ministration concerning the returning of 
territories. 

It is to be hoped that things will be so. but 
there is no law of nature that says that the 
Americans will not withdraw under any 
circumstances before Soviet threats in the 
Middle East as actually implied in all the 
alternatives presented by Professor Safran. 

A Democratic administration is likely to 
be much more interested in reaching a 
reduction of global tension than a 
Republican administration; the Democrats 
are also liable to ha/e more trust in 
assurances and hints of assurances from 
Moscow than the Republicans. 

They are liable, therefore, to make more 
far-reaching concessions to the Soviets than 
the Republicans and not the opposite, as 
implied by the conclusions of the survey. 

The warnings of a Republican president 
are likely to be considered much more 
seriously in Moscow than the warnings of a 
Democratic president, especially if the 
Democratic candidate is one who won the 
candidacy as a result of his success in the 
race "who wants peace at any price." 

And here is probably the main weakness 
of Professor Safran's conclusions: spoken 
not of an abstract Republican or 
Democratic president, but of an alive and 
known man. 

On the one hand. Nixon, whose support of 
Israel is strong and stems less from Zionism 
and Jewish votes than from his basic world 
view. On the other hand, a line of politicians 
for all of whom - except Senator Jackson, 
whose chances are not the best among them 
- the support of Israel is contradictory to 
their attitudes towards the rest of in- 
ternational problems. 

Professor Safran may be right in saying 
that life for the Jewish community and its 
leaders in the United States will be easier 
under a Democratic administration. It may 
also be that Israel will have better con 
nections with a Democratic president. But 
Professor Safran's research does not prove 
this, as it does not prove that a change ol 
men in the White House will further promote 
1 "peace tinner tbndittohs '(tesiraWe' ta- Israel. 



Reynolds, Bolton Impress in Scrimmage 




. 



Action from Patriots' scrimmage. Tom Reynolds (21) after cat- 
ching pass from Dowling. (Photo by Steve Schmidt) 



The New England Patriots 
concluded their first week of 
practice Saturday with their first 
intersquad scrimmage. Primarily 
designed to look at newer players 
rather than established veterans, 
the scrimmage ran 80 plays. Three 
offensive units, led by Jim 
Plunkett, Brian Dowling, and 
Steve Goepel, worked against 
three defensive units put together 
by the coaches. The first units 
played the least, while the other 
squads, composed of players who's 
jobs are less sure, received more 
careful scrutiny. 

In total, the offense produced 
four touchdowns, including one on 
an unusual play in which the 
referee set a pick for Tom 
Reynolds, the team's top draft 
choice from San Diego State, 
enabling Reynolds to scamper the 
last of his 51 yards on a Brian 
Dowling pass. 

The coaches' reaction to the 
scrimmage ranged from satisified 
to ecstatic. "Excellent, excellent," 
was the comment of Receiver 

exactly. Both made four of four 
extra points, and both made a 42 



coach Jerry Stoltz. Head Coach 
John Mazur, who "won't be 
satisfied until we win the Super- 
Bowl," was pleased with the 
performance. He thought the first 
defense did a "fine job," his 
highest words of praise. In- 
dividuals singled out included Ron 
Bolton, a rookie cornerback from 
Norfolk State, linebacker Ken 
Price, running back Odell Lawson, 
Randy Vataha, and Brian Dowling, 
who in his stint at quarterback 
completed seven of eight passes for 
104 yds. and a touchdown. Mazur 
praised Josh Ashton, a rookie 
running back who gained 36 yds. in 
14 carries while fumbling twice, 
but added "he has to hold out to the 
football". A final category of his 
praise, "look like they can help 
us," included rookie offensive 
lineman Sam Adams and third 
year pro Sonny Banks, a guard. 

General Manager Upton Bell 
praised Adams, Banks, Dowling, 
Bolton, and defensive tackle Ron 
Berger. Berger was involved in the 
only fight, a draw with tight end 
John Nelson. 




Jfe 



The scrimmage featured the 
place kickers, but not the punters. 
Mike Walker, alias Superfoot, and 
Charlie Gogolak. the incumbent, 
duplicated each other's efforts 



yd. field goal. Both missed on tries 
of 47 yds. If the coaches were able 
to decide anything from this, it was 
on the red-hot battle for holder 
going on between Daryl Johnson 
and Randy Vataha. Earlier in the 
week Coach Mazur declined to 
comment on this battle, saying he 
was thinking about things other 
than who would hold the football on 
extra point and field goal attempts. 
In the eyes of this observer, Daryl 
Johnson is ahead at this point on 
the strength of his ability to get the 
laces to the front the quickest. But 
Vataha, whose secret ambition in 
life is to be a holder, is still in the 
thick of the fight. 

The game films told the coaches 
something about certain players 
who were not singled out for 
praise. Nine of them were cut 
yesterday. The team is now down 
to 76 players. Sixteen more must go 
by August 5. 

It is difficult to judge the 
Patriots' prospects for the season 
by watching them against the 
Patriots. Could Bobby Fischer beat 
Bobby Fischer? Comparing this 
year's edition to last year's, 
however, is comforting. At this 
point in the season, the Patriots of 
1972 are way ahead of last year's 
team, which came within a few 
touchdowns of a winning season. 
The outlook here is a good one. 



AT THE BLUtWAU. 



Graduate Advisors Applications 



Applications are currently available in the 
Student Activities Office in the Campus Center for 
positions as resident area graduate advisors for 
student activities for 1972-73. Any full-time 
graduate student is eligible for consideration for 
these positions, which are designed to assist 
student groups in the resident areas with cultural. 



educational, social, governmental, and social 
action activities. 

Detailed information and job description are 
available in the Student Activities Office. Deadline 
for submission of applications is Friday. August 4, 
1972. in the Student Activities Office. 




MON.-THURS. 

9 P.M.-l A.M. 



»*trK. 



Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BRANDYWINE's 
beautiful new one and two bedroom model apartments. 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few 
minutes we'll show you all the reasons in the world why 
BRANDY WINE is a better place to live. We invite you 
to compare features and compare prices. The few 
minutes you spend with our two beautiful models could 
be the most important minutes you'll spend all year. 




Conveniences which make BRANDYWINE so 
eminently 'livable" include: 

Spacious, well laid out units 

All brand name, house sized appliances 

An abundance of closet space 

Individually controlled, central gas heat, air- 
conditioning and cooking included in rent 

Extra soundproofing and security features 

Large, partially enclosed, private patios and 
balconies 

Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 

Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager responsible 
for all apartment services and maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam Furniture 
Leasing Company, Hartford. Connecticut 

One Bedroom Units from $200 
Two Bedroom Units from $225 




BRANDYWINE (4 Amherst 



50 MEADOW STREET 

AMHERST 

549-0600 



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 197H 



Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 




Preservation Hall _ 

azz Here Thursday 



} 



'.'bi^ Jim" Kobinson plays trombone for Preservation Hall Jazz 
Kami. 




The Preservation Hall Jazz Band will be 
at Haigis Mall for a concert at 8 o'clock on 
Thursday (SU Ballroom, 7 and 10, if rain). 
These are the musicians who created Jazz 
and they will play New Orleans Jazz. The 
program may include a tune from the 1960 s 
and the audience is sure to hear some of the 
long time favorites of jazz and casual fans 
alike, but it will be New Orleans Jazz after 
these people have played it. 

One of the most striking features of New 
Orleans Jazz is its simplicity. The players 
are friendly people,* a short visit and you 
seem to know them well and you are glad 
f ou do. But they are not simple people, it 
often takes a very complicated person to 
make a clear, simple statement... and that is 
what these original Jazz musicians do. 

New Orleans Jazz isn't rushing some 
place just to show off, the tempos are from a 
warm climate where they were danced to or 
marched to. The screaming, frenetic sounds 
are not there, because these instruments are 
singing. The men all add to each other, there 
fc no need for a spotlight. But the music has 
a purpose in every case. To dance, to march, 
to croon away a hurt, or just to express the 
happiness of being alive, that's purpose 
enough but it is purpose. 

The music always has a melody that can 



be found in the lines of one instrument or 
another. The true New Orleans Musician is 
playing for all of the people. He has made 
his mark, he knows that he plays well and so 
the music gets the full attention, no one is 
upstaging another. 

Even though the music was simple, it was 
strong. The musicians loved it, the 
audiences loved it and soon after it was born 
in New Orleans, it moved up the Mississippi 
to Chicago and New York and then around 
the world. Many complex kinds of jazz have 
had their vogue and faded into oblivion, but 
New Orleans Jazz was always there. 
Sometimes the record companies weren't 
looking for new sessions, the new fads took 
the younger audiences for a time, more 
blatant emotional approaches captured 
imaginations for a time, but New Orleans 
always listened to its own and Europe, 
having found this music never gave it up 

So the music of New Orleans lasted, and it 
lasted in the minds of the people who will 
play it here in concert. They created it, and 
even though they pass it on to younger 
musicians, this experience remains unique 
The tunes will live, but chances are the 
music will be a memory after the present 
members of the Preservation Hall Jazz 
Band have ceased to travel and play. 



Kings 



Rfjftrr Tibei ii as Father John is seen in a scene from the I' Mass 
Summer Theativ production of "To Happy Marriage and Faithful 
Wives". Production dates are July I7-H and August :'.-.">, H:M) p.m. in 
Hie aii -conditioned Studio Theatre in South College. Tickets 
available at Itai tlett Box Office or by calling MS-2S7I. 



C.E.Q. To Show Film 



"POPULATION ECOLOGY" 

The Coalition for Environmental 
Quality will show the film 

Population Ecology at 6:30 p.m. 
tonight in Room 162 of the Campus 
Center. The film is free and runs 
about one-half hour. A discussion 
of the dynamics of populations and 
their relationships with sustaining 
resources which is presented in the 
film will be discussed afterwards. 
This discussion may involve the 



study by Dennis Meadows of MIT 
called the Limits of (irowth and the 
Jay Forrister book on World 
Dynamics. 



Men, 
Mutiny 
Tonight 

Academv Award winning film 
ALL THE KINDS MEN is the lead 
movie in tonight's Double Feature. 
Starring Proderick Crawford and 
Joanne Dru, it is based on the 
Pulitzer Prize novel by Robert 
Penn Warren. 

It is the story of a southern 
governor who won the adoration of 
the voters with his spectacular 
public works, while he and his 
associates grew wealthy from 
graft and corruption. As is often 
the case today, few citizens cared 
what took place behind the scenes 
and the few who did were crushed 
under the weight of the ad- 
ministration. 

The co-feature. THE CAINE 
MUTINY, based on the novel by 
Herman Wouk, is the story of an 
embattled minesweeper and its 
nerve taut personnel. 

The story reaches its climax 
when the officers of the CAINE 
take over the ship during a 
typhoon. The court martial trial 
afterward and its unexpected 
sequel are no less dramatic or 
demanding. The movie stars 
Humphrey Bogart, Jose Ferrer, 
Van Johnson, and Fred Mac 
Murray. 

How Much to 
Own a Car? 

The cost over ten years 
• depreciation, maintenance, gas 
and oil, parking, tolls, insurance, 
taxes i comes to $13.Fj2.95 for a 
standard model. $10,807.60 for a 
compact. $9,444.03 for a sub- 
compact The Department of 
Transportation figures are for cars 
driven 10,000 miles a year over the 
ten-year period. 



Pops, Fiedler At Tanglewood 



lANGLEWOOD, LENOX-- 
Arthur Fiedler conducts the Boston 
Pops at Tanglewood with soloists 
and chorus in an evening of the 
music of Lerner and Loewe. 
Soloists participating in the annual 
Pops Pension Fund concert are 
soprano Louise Russell, mezzo- 
soprano Corinne Curry, tenor 
Vahan Khanzadian, and baritone 
Richard Fredericks, with the 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus. John 
Oliver, director. The concert takes 



place Tuesday, August 1 at 8:30 
p.m. in the Shed. 

Tickets are now on sale at the 
Festival Ticket Office; 

Tanglewood; Lenox. 
Massachusetts 01240, telephone 
area code 413. 637-1600. as well as 
all Ticketron locations in New 
England and New York State. 
Ticket prices range from $3.50 to 
$8.50. Admission to the Lawn is $3. 
on sale two hours before the con 
cert. 



DOUBLE FEATURE FILM SERIES 

"All The King's 

**■ ' "The 
Caine Mutiny 

9 p.m. 

Tuesday, July 25 
Campus Center Auditorium 

Free Admission — UAAass Summer Students First 



7 p.m. 



II 



RADIOLOGIC 
TECHNOLOGISTS 

Part T ime openings available in 
modern progressive department 
of teaching hospital, for 



registered 
technologists. 
7: 30a.m. 
12 Noon 



or 



eligible 



11: 30a.m. 
4: 00p.m. 



5 day week including alternating 

Saturdays. 

8 a.m. 4 p.m. Saturday and/or 

Sunday 

Apply in 
Personnel Department 
SPRINGFIELD HOSPITAL 

HOSPITAL 

MEDICAL CENTER 

759 Chestnut Street 

Springfield 

An Kqual Opportunity Employer 




"But I only came in for an oil change ! " 

No Automotive Rip Off's 
SPENCER'S Mobil* STATION 

161 NO. PLEASANT ST., AMHERST ( Nextto P.O.) 

FREE ESTIMATES 
Open 24 hours — Road Service — 256-8426 




Poetry of the Latin World 
and the Caribbean 

ROBERT MARQUEZ, VICTORIA ORTIZ 
LUISIN MEDINA 

Wed., July 26 8 p.m. 

Campus Center, Room 163 

Sponsored by Summer Program Council 



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Five 




Chuck Davis Dance Co.: 
Hot, Dynamic, Flexible 



By ELLENI KOCH 

Three young black women came 
on stage last Thursday evening in 
Bowker Auditorium, moving as 
gracefully and controlled as 
dancers of the Kabuki. Then 
delightfully they let themselves go, 
dancing and singing, smiling 
engagingly and yelping en- 
chantingly, for these young girls 
were to enjoy their one last fling 
before their initiation into 
womanhood. This work was in- 
spired by a traditional Guinean 
dance. 





The male counterpart, a West 
African dance, consisted of four 
amazingly agile black men led by a 
village elder, representing entry 
into manhood. One particular 
dancer during a solo rendition 
demonstrated extraordinary 
flexibility with his body. At times 
his limber torso jackknifed back- 
wards in such a rapid fire action 
that it seemed as if his shoulders 
contacted his hips. 

"Yarubi", another Guinean 
inspired dance, was performed 
beautifully by the women of the 
Chuck Davis Dance Company. 
Their uninhibited rhythm was such 
that it was impossible not to 
become captivated by the motions. 
In this women's flirtation dance, 
the costumes were of particular 
interest, all basically the same, 
with modifications on each one 
giving each dancer a unique in- 
dividuality. Every dance was 
doing her own thing, but they were 
all doing it together. One felt not 
only the energy, but also the 
tremendous synergy. 

Another dance of particular note 
was the Dance of the Royal Watusi 
Warriors. The percussionists, who 
were superb throughout the 
program, were especially effective 
here. by keeping a climactic beat 
going forever, something normally 
impossible. The dancers, syn- 
chronized bv the fever pitch of the 
insistent drum beats, held the 
interest at a high level. 

After intermission the mood 
changed to one of more sobriety: a 
beautifully poetic, quiet dance, "A 
Simple Prayer", accompanied by 
the recorded voice of Miriam 
Makeba. Then Chuck Davis came 
on strong with some sarcastic 
patriotism, singing in a really 
deep, fine voice, imitative of opera 
singers, the correct words to "My 



Chuck Davis Dance Company performed in Bowker Auditorium last Thursday 
Nash). 



Photo by Carl 



Urban Vehicle Designed, Built At UMass 



ByJEFFLEGGE 

A multi-disciplinary group of 
UMass students is building a 
hybrid-hydraulic urban vehicle 
which will be entered in the Urban 
Vehicle Design Competition 
(UVD). The UVDC is an outgrowth 
of the Clean Air Car Race which 
was held a few years ago. The 
urban vehicle has been designed 
for the urban environment instead 
of long-range high speed driving as 
in the Clean Air Car Race. The 
objectives of the UVAC are: 

—to stimulate a project- 
oriented approach in engineering 
education which will be socially 
relevant, thereby encouraging 
students to confront a real-world 
situation and providing a valuable 
supplement to academic activities. 

—to educate and stimulate the 
general public with regard to in- 
novative concepts in vehicle 
technology which concern urban- 
area vehicles. 

—to contribute to the solutions of 
existing problems by focusing upon 
a project within the transportation 
field -specifically, the design and 
construction of an urban-area 
vehicle. Each vehicle entered in 
the competition will be tested and 
scored on the following areas- 
emissions, safety, consumer cost, 
handling, acceleration, braking, 
noise, turning circles, parkability, 
drivability, space utilization, 5 
mph crash, energy efficiency, and 
size. An overall winner will be 
declared strictly on the basis of the 
scoring formula. In addition, 
awards will be given to those en- 
trants who exhibit HIGH 
QUALITY INNOVATIVE IDEAS. 
Also awards will be given to the 



entrant with the lowest emissions 
and the winner in the safety 
competition. 

Eighty colleges and universities 
are expected to be represented 
at the competition which will be 
held from August 6-11 at the 
General Motors Proving Grounds 
in Michigan. Nationwide television 
coverage is expected. 

The UMass entry is a hybrid- 
hydraulic vehicle with a twenty 
horsepower Wankel engine which 
runs at a constant speed driving a 
hydraulic pump which will drive a 
hydraulic motor. The Wankel 
engine will run on either propane 
or gasoline. Catalytic mufflers will 
be used in order to help reduce 
emissions below 1976 standards. 
The shell of the car is a Datsun 
Body (total wreck) which has been 
modified to meet necessary 



specifications for the competition. 
Safety features are bumpers that 
can withstand 5 mph barrier 
crashes, a crusable frame, padded 

roll cage, padded interior and 
dashboard and mandatory safety 
belts. The car is nearing com- 
pletion and arrangements are 
being made for the trip to 
Michigan. 

Donations are still needed to 
help finance the completion of the 
project. If anyone is interested in 
helping or just dropping by to see 



what is going on, the activities are 
located in Gunness Lab behind 
Marston Hall. The doors are open 
almost 24 hours a day. 



Exhibit and Sale 
of 

Original Oriental Art 



CHAMPION TERMPAPERS 

636 Beacon Street (1*05) 
Boston, Mass. 02215 
Research Material for Term- 
papers, Reports, Theses, etc. 
Lowest Prices, Same Day Service. 
Por information, write or call (617) 
536-9700. 



from Marson, Ltd. 



Wednesday, July 26 

11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Campus Center Concourse 



Sponsored by Summer Program Council 



Country 'Tis of Thee" (you know 
the rest) until the end, when the 
intonation and words transformed 
into "Warped Land of Misery, of 
Thee I Moan". 

Truly, he made it quite plain that 
for his people, "liberty" is an 
obvious farce, and the majority of 
the audience seemed to agree. 
Another striking moment of this 
performance was the piece "Listen 
Amerika", written by Jackie 
Early, executed by Chuck Davis. 
Determinedly, Davis emotionallyi 
called to the Nation, reminding it 
not to blame blacks (and other 
oppressed minorities) for the mess 
America is in. The real reasons are 
by now cliches. At the end of this 
rhetoric, he reaffirmed that blacks 
are not second class, but "were on 
top". With that, the crowd (black 
and white) nearly went wild, with 
the essence of the entire evening 
summed up in a phrase spoken out 
by a young black woman sitting in 
the audience, "That was dynamite 
stuff' 

Things were getting hot, and not 
only due to the sweltering heat in 
that boilpot of a second rate excuse 
for an auditorium. The Ensemble 
came on again; it was miraculous 
how they endured the heat as one 
witnessed their rich skin glossy 
with sweat. The dancing con- 
tinued; the drumming continued; 
the audience became incredibly 
even more receptive than befor*'. 
There were two complete standing 
ovations, and two unscheduled 
encores. What an orgy of muscular 
coordination in the beautiful form 
of the dance. 

Kudos to the Summer Program 
Council in engaging the Chuck 
Davis Dance Company. By all 
means, I recommend this group be 
procured ior the regular year also. 





THE MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE 
SUMMER THEATRE 

proudly presents 
the hilarious British farce 



SEE HOW THEY RUH 



Tues. - Sat., July 25 - 29 at 8:30 p.m. 
Tickets $2.50 and $3.50 
students $1 off any ticket 

BOX OFFICE open 10 a.m. -9 p.m. Doily Except Sonday 
Phone (413) 538-2406 

COMING: LUV August 1-5 




Thursday, July 27, 1972-8:00 P.M. 
GOODELL LIBRARY LAWN 

University of Massachusetts 

Rain Location: S.U. Ballroom, 7 * 10 p.m. 

U. Mom. Summer Students with LD.'s Sooto d First 

Sponsored by U. Mali. Summer Program Committee 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1972 




Summer Intramurals 



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 



Swim Meet 



WEDNESDAY JULY 26th at 6:00 p.m. at BOYDEN POOL. 

Events will include men's, women's and co-recreational races in ad- 
dition to diving competition. 

The swim meet is open to all summer school students, staff, and 
faculty. 

Interested participants may sign-up at the Intramural Office- Boyden 
"215 or at the pool just prior to the swim meet. 

50 yd. freestyle; 100 yd. freestyle; 50 yd. backstroke; 50 yd. butterfly; 
50 yd. breaststroke and Diving. 



Cross 
Country 

Results 

SUMMER INTRAMURALS 
CROSS-COUNTRY RACES 



"W 1 


£• 


* 1 • 






MENS* RESULTS (1.7 milt 


>s) 


P2101 


ne 5 


fctannin! 


?s 




1. JohnBrodhead 


8:07 


LCd 6' 


J L CU 1 VJ. JUL 1 1 




2. Mitch Guild 


8:21 


MENS SOFTBALL 


STANDINGS AS OF JULY 


19, 1972 




3. Mark Slavin 


8:35 












4. EdCalabrese 


8:49 


WESTERN LEAGUE 




NATIONAL LEAGUE 




5. Kalekeni Banda 


9:24 


Phi Sigma Delta 
Quiver 


3-0 
2-0 


Rickies 
Ounners 




3-0 
2-0 


6. Al Morris 

7. Fred Michels 


9:33 
9:36 


English Dept. 
Education 


2-2 
1-2 


Ringers 
Vets 




2-2 
1-2 


8. Gerald Pickett 

9. Dennis Klein 


10:27 


Rustlers 


0-4 


Yo-Yo's 




0-4 


WOMEN'S RESULTS (1.0 

1. Phyllis Olrich 

2. Ann Penny 


miles) 
6:14 
6:51 


CENTRAL LEAGUE 




AMERICAN LE^ 




3. Mimi Ward 


6:53 


Dry Heaves 


3-0 


Behaviormen 




3-0 


4. Pat O'Connell 


8:09 


Civil Engineering 


2-0 


Riley's 




2-1 


5. Carol Steele 


9:12 


Pigletts 


2-2 


Brett 




2-2 






MAE 


1-3 


No Names 




1-2 






Organized Whodunits 


0-3 


Pipefitters 




0-3 







VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS 
AS OF JULY 21. 1972 

CO-REC 

Giants 2-0 

Bodies 1-1 

Chuggers 0-1 

(Ii'iiocides 0-1 

Upward 0-2 

MENS LEAGUE A 

PSD 4-0 

Polymers 2-2 

Upward 2-2 

Cyborga 0-4 

MENS LEAGUE B 

Pipefitters 3-1 

APK 3-1 

BrettsBest 1-3 

Brets Bums 0-4 



Topof Campus Cards Expand 



The validity of all permanent 
Top of the Campus cards has been 
extended to September 15, 1972. 
This includes student, faculty. 



Letters 

Yes. do send in your comments 
on campus life, international af- 
fairs, national emergencies, etc. 
All we demand is that all letters to- 
the-editor be typed on a sixty-space 
line, one side of each page, double- 
spaced. 



staff, and alumni cards. 

The hours for taking photos for 
Top of the Campus membership 
cards and Staff/Faculty ID cards 
have been changed. The new hours 
of operation are Monday through 
Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room 
821. Campus Center. 



The PLACE THAT MADE 2 

AMHERST FAMOUS <? 

DRAKE RESTAURANT 2 

Village Inn ; 



RATHSKELLAR 
HS AMITY 253-2548 



5-College 

Info 
545-2566 



Learn how to print your own textiles, posters, cards, 
& prints! 

Imrett Craftsman ft Artists 
offers Summer Course In 

SILKSCREEN PRINTING. 

Course will include the building of a silkscreen. 
Begins Aug. 3. $60. includes all materials. 
For more information call 549-1096. 



A NIGHT OF 

SUPER FLICKS 

LAURELS, HARDY 

.BETTY BOOP 

ABBOTT & COSTELLO 

PROPAGANDA FILM 

.NEWSREELS AND 

MUSICALS OF THE '40'S 

FELIX THE CAT AND 

OTHER CARTOON GREATS 

.CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

LOTS MORE FUN FILMS 

FRIDAY — JULY 28 — 8:15 

AMHERST FOLKLORE CENTRE 



CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED 



FOR SALE 



FOR RENT 



You get results with our Classifieds 

Crier Classifieds 

INSERTION ORDER 

50 c each insertion 

Client 



DATES TO RUN 



Headline 



ADVERTISING COPY 



Thunderbird, (Ford) '67, 
Landau 4 dr. at/ps/pb, powr 
wndws. New exhaust many 
other features, excel, cond. 
S1250. Call 532 9309 (Holyoke). 

8/1 

22" Black & White TV $45., 21" 
Color TV $150. TELEVISION 
C ENT ER, 55 North Pleasant St. 
Amherst, 2nd Floor, * 253 5100. 

8/15 

KAWASAKI 350 CC 68 only 8800 
miles, very fast, perfect running 
condition. Call Rick 549 0384 
$400 or best offer. 

7/27 

Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $185/M incl utilities. Call 
Resident Mgr 665 4239, if no 
answer 1 786 0500. 

8/15 

1971 Ford Torino Squire Station 
Wagon V 8, power brakes, 
power steering, gray gold — 
3,000 miles. Best Offer. Call 

2535641 8/15 



EFF. AND2 1/2-rm. apts. furn., 
all utils., parking, pool, 9 mo. 
lease avail, from Sept. 1. Reas. 
rent Amherst Motel opp. 
Zayre's. 



8/15 



ROOM in private home in Athol 
for quiet type grad student — 
male. Tel (617) -249 4087 
evenings. 

7/27 

Female wanted Sept. 1st to 
share room in apartment across 
street from Puffton Village. 
Approximately 65/mo., utilities 
included. Call Donna 549 0130 — 
keep trying. 

7/27 



NOTICES 



GAYS, wishing to meet others, 
come to 91 1 CC tonite ( Thurs. ) at 
7 30 or call Student Homophile 
League 5 0154. 

8/20 









































1 






































\ 



















































































































































































Pleas* Insert one character, space, or punctuation mark per box. 



1964 Chevrolet Impala Con 
vertible, good condition, contact 
Larry at 549 6676 or leave 
message at Crier office. 

1969 MGB low mileage; 6 radial 
tires; AM radio; overdrive; 
reasonable offers only; call 
after 8:30 p.m. nightly or 
anytime on weekends; 253 7464. 

8/1 

1970 Kawasaki Bighorn 350cc, 
great bike for street or trail. 
Very good condition, must sell 
immediately. Call 549 6820. 

8/3 

ENTERTAINMENT 

A NIGHT OF SUPER 
FLICKS— ABBOTT & 

COSTELLO, BETTY BOOP, 
LAUREL & HARDY, OLD 
NEWS REELS, PROPAGANDA 
FILMS, CHAPLIN, 8. MORE! 
FRIDAY, JULY 28, AMHERST 
FOLKLORE CENTER, 8:15. 

7/27 



You are most welcomed to come 
every Tuesday at 7 p.m. for an 
informal gathering of The 
Christian Science College 
Organization. Hear how Truth 
and Love unfold good for all. 
Campus Center 809. 

8/15 

Introductory lecture on Tran 
scendental Meditation. Offered 
by Sims (UMass) on Thurs., 
July 27th at 8 p.m. in Rm. 805-809 
Campus Center. 

7/27 

PERSONAL 

FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207-T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

8/15 

Wm., 21, desperate for cash. 
Will do most anything for 
money. And I mean anything. 
Write and make ? request: 
Boxholder — Po. Box 460 — 
Amherst. 

7/25 



Nixon Veto Causes Sharp PBS Cutback 



By John Carmody 
Washington Post 

WASHINGTON — The Public 
Broadcasting Service plans to 
curtail its 1972-73 prime time 
schedule as a result of President 
Nixon's June 30 veto of a two-year, 
$155 million authorization for 
public broadcasting. 

Children's programming, drama 
and at least three weekly public 
affairs shows - including the 
Boston-produced "Advocates," 
William F. Buckley's 'Firing 
Line'' and "Black Journal" - will 
be directly affected by the cut- 
backs, according to network of- 
ficials. 

In addition, planning for a new 
children's series and long-range 
development of several major 
dramatic series have been dropped 
for the time being. 

The bill vetoed by Mr. Nixon, 
sponsored by Rep. Torbert H. 
Macdonald <D-Mass.),- would have 
provided the corporation for public 
broadcasting with $65 million in 
fiscal 1973, a sharp increase over 
the $35 million provided in the one 
year authorization for 1972. 

Some $15 million of this year's 
corporation budget went for 
program production costs and was 
matched by $21 million from 
outside sources such as the Ford 
Foundation, Xerox and Mobil. 

At the time of the veto Mr. Nixon 
called for reconsideration of the 
Administration broadcasting bill. 
Although it would increase the one- 
year authorization to $45 million, a 
major provision also siphons off 30 



percent of that total directly to the 
nation's 223 local public television 
stations. This would actually result 
in a reduction of program funds 
presently available to the cor- 
poration. 

Public broadcasting executives 
were not optimistic about a 
possible override of the 
Presidential veto as Congress 
returned from its convention 
recess. 

Moreover, public broadcasting 
sources feared the 17-day recess 
might have blunted the issue for a 
Congress returning to a logjam of 
important money bills. 



In confirmation 
forecasts, the Senate 
approved the 

authorization for PBS. 



Astro-Cast 



By Sydney Omarr 



Leo is master of the grand gesture - all 
the way or nothing, adored or reviled ■ 
many have plenty to say about Leo, but 
few can ignore natives of this zodiacal 
sign. There have been two U.S. 
Presidents b» n under Leo: Benjamin 

Harrison and Herbert Hoover. 

* • * 

ARlEf March 21 April 19): Accent is 
on ability to make decisions which affect 
future security. Key is to be ambitious 
and self reliant. One who whispers 
secrets actually is trying to extract in- 
formation. Protect your own interests. 

TAURUS (April 20 May 20): Good 
lunar aspect now coincides with ability to 
campaign, to spread message, to reach 
people at distant places. Catch up on 
calls, correspondence. Submit 

manuscript, format. Creative efforts pay 
dividends. 

GEMINI (May 21 June 20) : Accent is 
on partnership procedures, co operative 
efforts. You may be asked to handle other 
people's money. Give and receive 
receipts. Don't take on burden belonging 
to another. Keep financial statements in 
order. 

CANCER (June 21 July 22): Emphasis 
is on legal affairs, public relations. 
Protect image. Be ir lependent without 
being arrogant. S**?.>s originality. Give 
attention to partner, mate. Look to future 
instead of brooding about past. 

LEO (July 23 Aug. 22): Trust hunch. 
Give full play to intuitive intellect. Utilize 
lessons learned in recent past. Share 
knowledge. Teach and learn. 

VIRGO (AGug. 23 Sept. 22): Stress 
versatility Move about ask questions 
and experiment. Take nothing for 
granted. Sagittarian could play key role. 
Travel and special message are on 
agenda. Be willing to laugh at your own 
foibles. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23 Oct 22): Be aware of 
apparent minor matters. Thorough ap 
proach is necessary. Leo and Aquarius 
figure prominently. Be ready for change 
of tactics Protect property interests. 
Consult expert Work out tax problems. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 Nov. 21): Travel is 
strongly emphasized. Gemini and Virgo 
persons figure prominently. Special 
dealings indicated with neighbors, 
relatives. You hear many stories. Base 
conclusions on facts, not rumors. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 Dec. 21): You 
add to possessions. Improve comforts of 
home. Harmonize family relationships 
Deal with Taurus and Libra. Income 
potential shows improvement. Obstacle 
to progress is removed. Diplomatic ap- 
proach succeeds. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 Jan. 1»): Take 
initiative. Make new starts in new 
directions. You are able to see through 
pretense. Be realistic. Don't sell yourself 
short. You have plenty to offer. Be sure 
others know it and treat you accordingly. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 • Feb. 18): Accent 
on organizations, groups, hospital, 
charitable project. Accept responsibility. 
You will be repaid for efforts. Older in 
dividual does have your best interests at 
heart. Respond in manner that shows 
appreciation. 

Pisces (Feb. 19 March 20): You are 
recipient of special favor. Burden you 
have been carrying could be lifted. Aries 
plays prominent role. Friend aids in 
putting program across. Hopes and 
wishes are featured. Gain is shown. 

IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY you 
are perceptive and introspective. You 
have ability to express yourself in unique 
manner November could be one of your 
most significant months in 1972 You have 
individual style and few persons can 
forget you 



of these 

last week 

one-year 



The corporation has asked the 
PBS network to reschedule its fall 
and winter programming, based on 
the one-year, $45 million Nixon bill. 
Last spring, the corporation's 
directors, suspecting just such a 
possibility as the Nixon veto, ap- 
proved three budget possibilities 
lor fiscal 1973, including, besides 
the potential $65 million and $45 
million authorizations, a return to 
this year's $35 million budget level. 

The corporation is presently 
operating on a continuing 
authorization of the $35 million bill. 

According to George Page, 
assistant to PBS President Hart- 
lord Gunn. the available network 
programming money is expected 
to drop about $2 million from the 
$30 million available this year. 

All scheduling changes. Page 
pointed out. must be approved by a 
budget panel composed of 12 public 
TV and radio station managers at 
the corporation level. 



The tentatively-scheduled 
network cutbacks for the next 
season, starting in September, 
include: 

Cancellation of a new 

children's series, which was in the 
planning stage. In addition, 'two 
or three'' children's specials have 
been deleted from the winter 
schedule and five segments of 
"Zoom." a popular WGBH-TV 
show aimed at 7- to 12-year-olds, 
have been eliminated. 

A sharp cutback in public 

affairs programming, a prime 
target of the Nixon Administration. 
Thus "Black Journal'' will lose two 
of its 39 segments this coming 
season; "The Advocates." 13 of 39; 
and Buckley's "Firing Line." Two 
of 42. In addition, said Page, two of 
15 specials planned by the National 
Public Affairs Center for 
Television (NPACT) will be 
dropped 

— —"Less drama all the wav 



bill, touched on at least four major 
objections commonly held by 
Republicans. 

They included NPACT com- 
mentator Sander Vanocur; the 
stinting of education and local 
community service in public 
broadcasting; program taste and 



content <e.g.. a nude ballet); anc 
biased public affairs program 
ming. 

Mr. Nixon, in his veto message, 
added the issue of centralization of 
power in the corporation for public 
broadcasting and the PBS network 
as well as "localism." 



Crossword Puzzle 



ACROSS 



around." according to Page 

There are other consequences of 
the budget cutback. Page pointed 
out. Pending requests to join PBS 
from 12 new television stations, 
including two in Maine, several in 
Vermont and stations in An- 
nandale. Va.. Las Cruces. N.M. 
and Muncie. Ind.. will be tabled at 
this time. Fach such "in- 
terconnection" with the PBS long 
lines costs about $50,000 in AT&T 
equipment Page said. 

The Senate voted over- 
whelmingly. 82-1, in favor of the 
bill. 

Mr. Nixon's veto message and 
certain rhetorical questions of- 
fered by Press Secretary Ronald 
Ziegler at the time of the veto help 
trace the boundaries of Ad- 
ministration dissatisfaction. 

Sen. Howard Baker Jr. <R- 
Tenn). who led the unsuccessful 
floor fight against the broadcasting 



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Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 

Theatre 



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1»72 



TVHIGMLIGHTS 

Tuesday 

8.00 p.m. All-Star Pre-Game Show 

(4, 20, 22, 30) 

8:15 p.m. Baseball All-Star Game 
(4, 20, 22, 30) - Was it worth pre- 
empting Ponderosa? 

8:30 p.m. Evening at Pops (24, 57) 
Ferrante and Teicher 
Wednesday 

7:30 p.m. Circus (30) - Four acts 
from Copenhagen. 

8:00 p.m. Football (18) • Toronto 

Argonauts vs. Alouettes in Montreal. 
8 30 p.m. Movie: "The Cabinet of 

Dr. Caligari" (24, 57) - Classic film. 

First horroi movie ever made (1919) 

dealing with an excursion through 

the subnabulist psychotic Caligari. 

The special effects backdrop alone is 

well worth the movie. 

10:30 p.m. ABC News Inquiry (8) - 

Women in the primaries. 

MOVIES 
July 25: "All the King's Men" 7 p.m.; 
"The Caine Mutiny" 9 p.m. - SU 
Ballroom. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

UMass: Exhibit 
July 26 

Exhibit and Sale of Original 
Oriental Art from Marson, Ltd., 11 
a.m. -7 p.m., CC Concourse. 

A Reading, Poetry of the Latin 
World and the Caribbean, 8 p.m., CC 
163. 



July 27 

Concert, PRESERVATION HALL 
JAZZ BANDOF NEW ORLEANS at 8 
p.m., HaigisMall. If rain, 7 p.m. and 
10 p.m., SU Ballroom. 
July 28 

Tangle wood 

7.00 p.m. Weekend Prelude - to be 
announced. 

9:00 p.m. Eugene Ormandy - 
Brahms: Tragic Overture; Sibelius: 
Symphony No. 5; Bartok: Concerto 
for Orchestra. 
July 29 

Tanglewood 

10.30 a.m. Open Rehearsal. 
8:30 p.m. Eugene Ormandy - 
Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3; 
Hindemith: Mathis der Maler; 
Strauss: Ein Heldenleben. 
July 30 

Tanglewood 

2:30 p.m. James Levine - Mozart: 
Violin Concerto No. 4; Joseph 
Silverstein Mahler: Symphony No. 

6. 

THEATER 

"Love, Marriage, etc." by Feiffer, 

South College July 27-August 9. 

Curtain time 8:30. Call 545 2579. 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Beverly - North Shore Music Circus. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Two By Two with 
George Rose and Nancy Andrews. 
Cambridge - Harvard Summer 
School Repertory Theater, Lofb 
Drama Center. Tomorrow, Fri., A 



Highlights 



T.V 



The Magic Circus 



THE MAGIC CIRCUS, a musical 
entertainment conceived by Jay 
McAuliffe and Marty Calabrese 
will play in the Blue Wall for a 
limited engagement August 4 
through 9 at 8:30 each evening. 
Tickets will be available free of 
charge. 

THE MAGIC CIRCUS is an 
original musical that was 
developed when McAuliffe and 
Calabrese were working together in 
Paris this spring for The American 
Repertory Theatre. McAuliffe 
says. "The circus is an important 
tradition whose potential has never 
been explored. It represents life 
through its own unique metaphor 
of clowns, acrobats, animals and 
spectacle. The problem that had to 
be dealt with was how to ef- 
fectively use its uniqueness and 
say something." 

The result is an experimental 
cabaret theatre piece which 
challenges the traditional ap- 
proach to "musical comedy" by 
eliminating the attempt to contrive 
songs into the framework of a plot- 
oriented script, and chooses in 



stead to use music to express the 
inner feelings or "sub-text" of the 
"downs" we meet every day. 

The cast includes: clowns, 
acrobats, magicians, animal 
trainers, musicians performed by: 
Susan Bates, Linda Brown, Cheryl 
Cardran, Bob Chanin, Sandi 
Donatini, Jack Fuller, Bill 
Hastings, Joan Heyman, Pat 
Kearney, Chris Klosson, Tom 
Leek, Charlotte Lettis, Brian 
MacLeod, Ken Podmostka, and 
Randy Whitney. These characters 
explore the roles that people play 
in society in order to survive, such 
as: the politician, the unhappily 
marrieds. the prostitute, the rock 
star who never made it, the eternal 
hostess, the soldier, the student, 
the "homecoming queen's" 
roommate who never gets her own 
chance, the people who cope with 
the world through artificial devices 
and aerosol sprays, the Miss 
America mannequin, the fool with 
common sense.... 

Tickets are available at the 
Information Desk, Campus Center 
and the Herter Box Office. 



Moon for the Misbegotten; Wed., 
Sat., The Matchmaker; Thurs., 
Heartbreak House. 

Harvard Yard Players. Wed., Frl., 
Winnie the Pooh (a rock musical); 
Fri., Sat., The Star Spangled Girl. 

The Proposition. Wed. -Sat., an 
improvised revue with music. 
Chatham - Monomoy Theater,. Wed. 
Sat., Come Blow Your Horn. 
Cohasset • South Shore Music Circus. 
Today, Preservation Hall Jazz Band; 
tomorrow-Sat., Sergio Franchi and 
Norm Crosby. 

Dennis - Cape Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Mourning in a Funny Hat (new 
by Dody Goodman) with Shirley 
Booth. 

Easthampton - Williston Summer 
Theater. Wed. at 10:30 a.m.; Fri., 
Sat. at 2 p.m.; The Emperor's New 
Clothes; Wed., Thurs. at 7:30 p.m., 
Fri., Sat. at 8 p.m., Rhinoceros. 
Falmouth - Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Conflict of Interest with Barry 
Nelson. 

Highfield Theater. Tues. Sat., The 
New Moon. 

September 
Call Up 

The Selective Service System 
today announced that the draft 
lottery ceiling will remain at RSN 
75 in order to meet the September 
call of 4,800 men. Lottery number 
75 was announced earlier as the 
ceiling for August inductions. 

September induction orders will 
be mailed beginning August 1 to all 
available men with lottery num- 
bers 75 and below who are 
classified 1-A and 1-A-0. These men 
will receive at least 30 days notice 
of their induction date. Con- 
scientious objectors, classified 1-0 
with lottery numbers 75 and below, 
will be issued orders to report to 
alternate work in civilian jobs at 
the same time. These men serve 
two years. 

Acting Draft Director Byron V. 
Pepitone explained that sufficient 
numbers of men to meet the 
September call will be available in 
the manpower pool at lottery 
number 75 and below. These are 
men who will become fully 
available following the issuance of 
orders for August inductions. 
September's inductions will bring 
the total of men inducted into the 
Army in 1972 to 36,000. The Defense 
Department has requested 
Selective Service to deliver 50,000 
men for the entire year 



Fitchburg - High Tor Summer 
Theater. Tues.-Sat., Not By Bed 
Alone. 

Framingham - Chateau de Ville 
Dinner Theater. Today, My Fair 
Lady with Noel Harrison; Tues.-Sat., 
Carousel with John Raitt. 
Greenfield - Arena Civic Theater. 
Thurs. -Sat., Happy Birthday, Wanda 
June. 

Hyannis - Cape Cod Melody Tent. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Mitzi Gaynor. 
Lenox - Arts Center. Today, Wed., 
Sat., Andre Gregory's Company 
presents Beckett's Endgame in open 
rehearsals. The Poetry Series: 
Today at 5:30 in the Apple Orchard, 
Robert Creeley and Honor Moore. 
Medford - Tufts Summer Theater. 
Wed. Sat., We Have Always Lived in 
the Castle. 

North Eastham - The Fisherman's 
Players. Today, Evolution of a 
Sister; tomorrow, Tues., The Savior 
and The Resurrection of J. Thadeus 
Sloan by Richard D. Waters; Wed., 
Sarah and the Sax, and Spreading the 
News; Thurs., Sarah and the Sax and 
The Clown; Fri., Sat., Color Me 
Human by Richard D. Waters. 
Orleans - Arena Theater. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Celebration. 

Plymouth - Priscilla Beach Theater. 
The Sensuous Woman. 
Provincetown - Playhouse -on- 
theWharf. Today-Sat., A Long Day's 
Journey Into Night. 
Saugus - Chateau de Ville Dinner 
Theater. Today, Tues., -Sat., The 
Sound of Music. 
South Hadley - Mount Holyoke 



College Summer Theater. Tues.-Sat., 
See How They Run. 
South Yarmouth Playhouse. 

Tomorrow Sat., Any Wednesday. 
Stockbridge - Berkshire Theater 
Festival. Today at 5 p.m., Tues. -Fri. 
at 8:30 a.m., Sat. at 5 and 9 p.m., The 
Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in- 
the Moon Marigolds with June 
Havoc. 

Sturbridge Ring-A-Round 

Playhouse. Today, Twelfth Night; 
Tues.-Sat., The Fourposter. 
West Harwich - Junior Theater. 
Tues. Thurs., Comedy of Errors. 
West Springfield - Storrowton 
Musical Theater. Tomorrow-Sat., 
Fiddler on the Roof. 
Williamstown - Theater. Wed. -Sat., 
Once in a Lifetime with Ken Howard. 
Worcester - Foothills Theater 
Company, Atwood Hall at Clark 
University. Tues.-Sat., A Shot in the 
Dark. 

CONNECTICUT 

East Haddam - Goodspeed Opera 
House. Tomorrow-Sat., Sunny with 
Leland Palmer. 

Farmington - Triangle Playhouse. 
Thurs. -Sat., The Gazebo. 
Ivoryton - Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., 1776. 

New Fairfield - Candlewood Theater. 
Tomorrow-Sat., See How They Run 
with Mickey Rooney. 
Sharon - Playhouse. Tues.-Sat., Dark 
of the Moon. 

Southbury - Playhouse. Tues.-Sat., 
Night Must Fall. 

Storrs - Nutmeg Summer Playhouse. 
Tues.-Sat., Plaza Suite. 



Price Comm. Checks Corps. 



WASHINGTON (AP) — The 
Price Commission adopted new 
rules today designed to double- 
check price information received 
from large companies. 

The commission said that large 
companies with annual revenues of 
over $50 million will have to hire 
auditors who will make semi- 
annual reports to the agency 
verifying previous information 
submitted. 

The auditors will have to study 
company reports submitted to the 
Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission and, in turn, report to the 
Price Commission what they have 
found. 

If the information coincides with 
that submitted to the Price 
Commission, the auditors would 
simply report that nothing of 
importance came to their at- 
tention. 

In another rules change, the 
commission adopted a new 
procedure for large companies to 



file price increase requests. The 
new procedure may delay price 
increases sought by some com- 
panies. 

It applies to firms with annual 
sales of over $100 million. These 
companies have to clear their 
increases with the government in 
advance, and the commission 
usually acts within 30 days. 

Under the new procedure, a 
company which sends in an in- 
correct form will receive a "denial 
without prejudice" of their 
requested increases. The firm will 
have to resubmit its request and, 
when it does, it can be granted 
within 30 days. 

Instead of approving the price 
increases as it has done in the past, 
the commission said that when a 
price increase request is filed, it 
will send the company a notice 
saying that if it doesn't hear 
anything further, it may raise 
prices within 30 days. 



By GILBERT J. SALK 

Probably the most commonly 
used and recognized deferment is 
the 4-F medical/psychological 
deferment An understanding of 
what this deferment is and how to 
properly request it will make 
things considerably easier for 
those using this alternative. 

The 4-F is given to those deemed 
unfit for military service except in 
time of declared war or national 
cmergencj . It is used both as a 
temporary deferment for those 
with short term medical problems 
and as a semi-permanent 
classification for those with more 
serious difficulties. 

The 4-F covers a wide range of 
infirmities. It is important to 
remember that the military 
regularly places people in 
situations which make extreme 
demands on their physical and 
emotional capabilities. This is the 
key to the medical deferment. If 
you have a problem which MAY be 
aggravated by extreme physical 
exertion or climatic conditions, or 
which could, at times, render you 
unable to perform your duties, then 
in all likelihood you qualify for a 4- 
F. 
Let's consider some examples: 
You have braces on your teeth. 
This isn't really a handicap unless 
you get too close to a girl who also 
wears braces. In a combat 
situation, however, the braces 
could possibly pull loose. The 
danpHn? pieces of metal could 

),iv: isly become a distraction, 



III" WI»V* l...^. •»^av~. w. w ..- v — . „ 

Maybe You Should Get A 4-F Deferment 

►»_ :li.. - i i „_—,.. *k~ ■ ■■mi ,i..,.L,','t tirori* »,/\n nnH is rpliirtant tnhpln nrpvpnt vnu elsewhere. 



and quite possibly a hazard. 

You have a large scar as a result 
of an operation. You can through 
your daily routine without any 
problems. But what happens if you 
have to face the rigorous daily 
routine of boot camp? If the scar 
tissue is weak, there's a possibility 
it might separate. This would 
obviously incapacitate you, and 
may make the army liable to be 
sued. They don't particularly want 
to be placed in such a situation. 

You are allergic to insect bites. 
In most cases, you are able to 
avoid situations where you might 
be stung. And in any event, proper 
medication is probably not too far 
away. But in the jungles of 
Southeast Asia, for example, there 
seem to be more attracted to than 
repelled by most insect repellants. 
An insect bite could incapacitate or 
even kill you. Thus, if you have 
never had a serious reaction to any 
kind of insect bite or sting, and it 
required medical attention, you 
may be eligible for a 4-F. 

Other things which may exclude 
you are severe allergies, any at- 
tack or asthma since your 12th 
birthday, migraines, high blood 
pressure, trick knees, elbows 



army, the army doesn't want you 
You can protest this all you want, 
but the draft laws clearly state that 
they cannot draft you if you have 
any of the ailments on the Surgeon 
General's list of deferable con- 
ditions (the list is available in the 
Draft Office in the Student Union). 
If your draft board makes a 
mistake and tries to draft you, you 



and is reluctant to help prevent you elsewhere. 

from being forced into a situation Too many people fail to take 

where you might have to kill proper advantage of the deferment 

somebody, do not remind him that possibilities offered by the SSS. 

his Hippocratic Oath requires him There is a tremendous range of 

to act to save lives. This might physical disabilities which could 

annoy him and complicate thtj gain you an opportunity to not kill 

matter unnecessarily. Instead, tell people in Vietnam. 

him that the draft board requested The physical demands which 

that you obtain letters pertaining may be made on you by 



have the right to appeal. However, to your physical condition to help military far exceed those made on 

• tl u m iiatalu :— M»ai !„■ n;irnvil nr niton ctrormmic 



if you prepare carefully, it is likely 
that you will need to use the appeal 
process. 

If you feel that you have medical 
or emotional problems, either 
current or old, consult a draft 
counselor. He or she will be able to 
give you advice suited to your 
particular situation. The following 
will provide a general guide, 
however. The most important 
deferments, is proper documen- 
tation. You should have letters 
from every doctor who has ever 
treated you for the ailment or 
condition for which you are seeking 
the deferment. The letters should 
state in both medical and lay terms 
the nature of the problem, how 
often the doctor has seen you, what 
treatment has been prescribed, 
and the prognosis for recovery. If 



them reach a decision in you by normal, or even strenuous, 
classifying you. This is not an civilian life. Basic training puts 
untruth. In the order to report for a unusual stress on weak muscles, 
physical, you are told to bring such healed bone fractures, old 
letters with you. You might also operation scars, etc. Duty 
remind him that it costs the assignments can expose you to 
government a tremendous amount climatic conditions which might 
of money on men who will have to aggravate respiratory diseases or 
be discharged for medical reasons, skin ailments. Strict military diets 
They also will not want to pay you could expose you continually to 
any disability pensions which you foods which cause allergic reac- 
would be entitled to if you were tions. 



damaged in any way while you 
were in the service. 

Other documentation, such as X- 
rays, etc., should also be obtained 
if pertinent. You should keep 
copies of all documentation, of 
course 



The list is merely endless. The 
point to remember is that what 
might be simply a minor in- 
convenience -or not bother at all- 
could become a major disability to 
the military. They do not want to 
have to worry about giving you 



Finally, you will probably have special duty assignments to cater 
to report for a physical to your allergies, or about your 
examination. Bring two copies of recurrent headaches, or dizzy 



pressure trick knees, emows, anatneprognosisiorrecovery.il cxdiiunaiiuii. duuk iwu wpiw w '**!!■.' "•" ~~TT] .7 ■ 
shoulders' or other joints, very flat at all possible, the letter should your documentation with you (but spells keeping you out of the action 
r .. 1 i i l.1 „»„ .1. .. ....♦„ tu ^^.i„.-v v,„ii«f that ho euro that vnn still havp thp at a crucial time, or a Dossiblc 



feet, some back problems, etc 

The list is nearly endless. Suffice 
it to say that many things which 
are merely annoyances, or less, in 
civilian life can become amatter of 
literal life or death in many 
military situations. If your health 
is going to be a real hassle for the 



also state the doctor's belief that 
military training or duty either will 
or could possibly cause an 
aggravation or recurrence of the 
condition, and/or that the condition 



be sure that you still have the at a crucial time, or a possible 

original at home in case both of flareupof an old case of asthma, or 

these sets are misplaced.) When similar problems. Above all else 

you are asked to turn in any doc- they don't want to have to pay you 

tor's letters give them one set and disability for an old injury or 



condition, ana/or inai ine cuiiuiuuii iui s reacis give urcm uhc sci anu uimuuhj «%» — »— ...j— j — 

will or could possibly interfere with keep the other for safekeeping in disease which military training or 

your performance of duty. case the first is accidentally duty causes to return. 

If you doctor is a super-patriot mislaid in the circular file or 



Preservation Jazz Band Returns 



The world famous Preservation Hall Jazz Band will 
appear here in a concert at 8:00 o'clock on Thursday, 
July 27, at Haigis Mall. (S.U. Ballroom at 7 and 10 
p.m. if rain.) 

The band is on tour from its home in legendary New 
Orleans where the members of the group all took part 
in the birth of our most American art form. 

Each of the members of the Preservation Hall Jazz 
Bands has memories of the days when jazz, or jass as 
they spelled it at the turn of the century, was taking 
form and shape and becoming a separate kind of 
music They were in the bands that marched to and 
from the cemetery for funerals, they were in the 
wagons that drove up and down French Quarter 

streets and battled it out when two bands met at a 
corner. They were on the river boats, in the saloons 
and 'sporting houses' and dances. In fact, they were 
the people who added their names to Freddy Kep- 
pard, Buddy Bolden, Louis Armstrong, King Oliver 
and Jelly Roll Morton in the exciting history of an 
American art form that grew from many sources in 
the special culture that was New Orleans. 



These are the people who made the history. But 
their vitality and youthful drive is still apparent in the 
singing, happy music of New Orleans and a concert 
today is full of the same spirit that made jazz the 
uninhibited music of the period around the first world 
war. 

People from all over the world have made 
Preservation Hall at 26 St. Peter Street a priority on 
trips to New Orleans, it has become something like a 
pilgrimage. But the real pilgrims are the musicians 
who have been traveling the United States and the 
world to bring the true New Orleans jazz played by 



the people who have played it for 50 years in the 
Parishes around New Orleans. They know the music 
best, and they play it the way it was created. 



New Orleans music is happy music, it is simple in 
technical terms, and complex in performance. It is 
not the straw hats and display of the "Dixieland" 
bands, nor is it the "Nicksieland" of New York. It 
won't cease to exist when these wonderful people are 
no longer with us, but it will never be the same 
because New Orleans Jazz is an attitude, a freedom 
of the spirit, and a memory of parades and dances 
and a good life. It is made up of years when a 
musician had to have the stamina to play several 
hours after another job on the docks or in the fields 
because he loved to play his horn. 

The Preservation Hall Jazz Bands have been 
quietly taking their place among the leading 
American concert attractions for several years. Each 
year the tours get longer, the audiences get bigger 
and young and old Americans are finding a happy 
evening in a theatre or concert hall. The band 
members are not concerned with a message, they are 
bringing joy and sorrow in their stamps and blues. 
Feet aren't often still while the band is playing and 
the everlasting youth and vigor of the players leaps 
across the footlights into the hearts of everyone in the 
audience. The line behind the band members as they 
lead a march through the hall at the end of the con- 
cert is testimony to the happiness that fills the hall 
when the band is there. 



Preservation Hall in New Orleans is owned and 
operated by Sandra and Allan Jaffe. Pryor-Menz 
Attractions, Inc. of Council Bluffs, Iowa, has 
arranged the current concert tour with the UMass 
Summer Program. 




July 27, 1972 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 1, Issue 9 



"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Smith 

Exhibit 

To Open 

Monday 



Exhibit of paintings by Al Smith 
will open Monday, July 31, in the 
Campus Center Music Listening 
Room at the UMass. The exhibit 
will run from July 31 to August 18. 

An opening day reception with 
the artist will be at 7 p.m., and is 
open to the public. 

Exhibit hours will be from 10 
a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through 
Saturday, and from 1 to 8 p.m. on 
Sunday. 

Al Smith received his bachelor's 
degree and master's in fine arts 
from Boston University where he 
won art awards in his freshman, 
sophomore and senior years. He 
has participated in several 
traveling shows throughout New 
England and exhibited at the In- 
stitute of Contemporary Art in 



1968. Smith also exhibited at the 
Rose Museum at Brandeis in 1969 
in a show entitled "12 Black Artists 
from Boston" and in a 1971 three- 
man show at the Elma Louis 
School of Fine Arts. Smith has also 
done several murals in the area, 
including one at the UMass Afro- 
American Studies Building, the 
New Africa House. 

For further information, contact 
the Student Activities Office in the 
Campus Center, 545 2351. 



Folk Fest Tuesday 
To Feature Kottke 



The UMass Summer Program 
'72 will present a folk concert on 
Tuesday, August 1 at 6:30 p.m. on 
Metawampe Lawn between the 
Student Union and Campus Center. 

Featured in the Concert is guitar 
wizard Leo Kottke and Bill Staines 
and Mike Cataldo as opening 



appeared at UMass in recent 
summers. Cataldo will make use of 
piano and an accompanying 
bassist. 

Staines, now 25, has been 
traveling throughout the United 
States, playing in coffee houses, 
quiet clubs and festivals in Texas, 



p^foman^^ ^"""^S?., Tht 

£ears ago in Muskogee, Oklahoma. Canada In Massachusetts the 
uo hpoTon his career with two Boston Phoenix has called him 
Sh^ob^urr^ «en-do« "simply the city's best per- 
albums on Oblivion and Takoma tormer 

labels before signing up with Incase of rain, the event wiU be 
Capitol. With Capitol he has since Jeldin the Student Union 
released two albums m > which he Ba M ^ m nformation on *«* and 
sings as well as plays Kottke is a ^^ summer eyents flt ^ 
protege of John Fahey who has Universit is availab i e by con- 
produced one of his albums. tacting t ' he st , lden t Activities 
Staines and Cataldo are off ice f n the Campus Center at 545- 
Massachusetts men. Staines has ^^ 

30,000 Maine Fish Killed, 
Pesticide Misuse Suspected 

AUGUSTA, Maine — Fish & Game Commissioner Maynard F. Marsh 
reported Wednesday that half the brook trout population at the DeBlois 
Hatchery in Washington County was wiped out Monday night. 

Marsh said that more than 30,000 fish were dead or disabled by Tuesday 
morning, with most of the remaining fish showing some ill effects. 

While declining to pinpoint the cause of the kill, Marsh said Blueberry 
fields in the immediate area of the hatchery's spring-fed water supply 
were sprayed on Monday. 

A team of investigators from Marsh's department, and the State Board 
of Pesticides Control, launched an investigation Tuesday. The board's 
supervisor - Donald F. Main - said samples of water and fish are being 
analyzed for insecticide residues. 

Mairs said action to be taken by the two state agencies will depend, in 
part, upon the results of the tests. He added that "an intensive in- 
vestigation" of the incident continues. 

Last week, Main* office reported three fish kills from the apparent 
misuse of pesticides, and he urged extreme caution on the part of farmers 
and growers. 




De De Pierce of Preservation Hall Jazz Band. 

Tm Qualified,' 
Eagleton Says 



LOS ANGELES — Democratic 
vice-presidential nominee Sen. 
Thomas F. Eagleton said Wed- 
nesday he made a mistake in not 
disclosing his past medical history 
sooner but still views it as nothing 
more serious than "a broken leg or 
a broken arm". 

The Missouri senator told a news 
conference here that Democratic 




Senator Eagleton 




Senator McGovern 

presidential nominee Sen. George 
McGovern's offer of the No 2 spot 
on the party ticket had come on a 
hectic day and that he believes he 
would have told McGovern if he 
had had more time to think. 

Eagleton revealed Tuesday that 
he had voluntarily submitted to 
hospital treatment in 1980, 1984 and 
1986 for "nervous exhaustion and 
fatigue" caused by overwork. He 
said he received electric shock 



treatment and pyschiatric care 
twice. 

"Quite frankly, I didn't think 
that these experiences were of that 
great moment," Eagleton said in 
answer to newsmen's questions of 
why he hadn't informed McGovern 
before he picked him as his run- 
ning mate at the Democratic 
National Convention. "I now 
realize that it is. I've read the 
morning headlines." 

Eagleton reiterated that he feels 
completely qualified to run for vice 
president and to occupy the White 
House. He said that he views his 
fatigue and depression caused trio 
of hospital stays as relatively 
minor. 

"In my own mind, I do view it as 
a broken leg or a broken arm," he 
asserted. "I realize many in the 
public do not." 

Asked if there was any chance he 
might withdraw as the Democratic 
vice-presidential nominee, 
Eagleton replied, "Well, there's no 
discussion underway as to my 
departure from the ticket." 

"I have said to reporters what I 
said to Sen. McGovern-that if at 
some future date it appears that 
my presence on the ticket might be 
an embarrassment to him or in any 
way injure the chances of him 
achieving the White House, I 
would, if that were his judgment, 
step aside," Eagleton said. 

"Very quickly and very promp- 
tly and very kindly, I might add, he 
said that that was not in his mind," 
Eagleton continued. "He was 
satisfied with what I told him about 
my past medical history." 

Meanwhile, McGovern remained 
secluded at his cabin retreat at 
Custer, S.D. Some 30 telegrams 
sent to McGovern were critical of 
Eagleton by a 2-1 margin. Some 
urged he be dropped from the 
ticket. 

McGovern rejected Tuesday an 
offer by his running mate to quit, 
saying he wants to "wait and see" 
the reaction. Eagleton first made 
the announcement of his medical 
history at McGovern's Black Hills 
retreat. The reaction followed the 
Missouri senator on his brief visit 
to Los Angeles en route to a union 
conference in Hawaii. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1972 



Page Two — University of Massa chusetts — The Crier 
/ 



The Crier is a semi-weekly pub ition of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offii « «re located in the Campus Center, 
Student Activities Area, Univ>- fy of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is ei.'i ^ly responsible for the contents. No 
copy is censored by the administratioi. ^fore Publication. Represented for 
national advertising by National Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

PERFORMING ARTS EDITOR Elleni Koch . 

PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 

I OCCASIONAL EDITORIAL CARTOONIST 



I 



Shelly Karp 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



Art Buchwald 



THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1*72 



Pepping Up Republicans 



The Republican convention 
planners are in a swivet. They 
have three nights of prime time on 
Aug. 21, 22 and 23 to fill, and not 
much to fill it with. At the moment 
there are no rules fights, no 
platform battles and no stop-Nixon 
movements. The GOP could have 
one of the best organized, well run, 
rancorless conventions in modern 
political history, but who the hell 
wants to watch it on TV? 

A close Republican friend, 
Hiram Staunchfield, who is head of 




ELECTION YEAR 



Campus Carousel 



Bicycles, Hair Clips 



"The Committee To Re-Elect The 
President Without Boring The 
People To Death," told me that his 
group was hard at work trying to 
make an exciting political con- 
vention out of a sow's ear. 

"It's going to be very tough this 
year to keep up the excitement," 
he said. "On the first night we plan 
to attack McGovern and Eagleton. 
The second night will be devoted to 
attacking the media, and on the 
third night we'll put on Nixon, Pat, 
Tricia and Julie. But I'm not sure 
that is enough. The American 
people will forgive anything but a 
dull television show." 

"What about the demonstrators 
outside the convention hall?" I 
asked. 

"That's our ace in the hole. If the 
people outside will demonstrate, 
we might be able to hold 
everyone's interest. One of the 
reasons we keep warning the 
demonstrators not to ruin our 
convention is that we feel it's the 
only way to get them to come to 
Miami." 

"Suppose no demonstrators and 
agitators show up for the 
Republican Convention? Won't 
that put you people in a bind?" 

"There will be demonstrators 
there," Staunchfield assured me, 
"if we have to bring them in our- 
selves. We've asked all our 
delegates who are driving to 
Miami to pick up any hitchiker who 
looks as if he's coming down to 
cause trouble. We're even talking 
about chartering buses from 
Cambridge, Berkeley and 
Georgetown to make it easier for 




the kids to come. We'll promise 
them room, board and a chance to 
be on prime time television. It's an 
offer they can't possibly refuse." 

"I hope for your sake they show 
up," I said to Staunchfield. "But 
kids are funny these days. If they 
know you need them to make your 
convention, they might stay away. 
Don't you have any other plans in 
case the demonstrations don't take 
place?" 

"Nothing that the networks 
would be interested in," Staun- 
chfield said. 

"Well, if all is lost, you still have 
Billy Graham," I said. 

"And if that fails," Staunchfield 
said, "Bob Hope has offered to tape 
his Christmas Show in front of the 
troops guarding the Republican 
Convention Hall." 



K\ TONY GRANITE 

LOST. STRAYED OR STOLEN 
RIKKS are providing a continuing 
problem to campus security people 
and their owners alike. 

At Louisiana State, for example, 
"stray" bikes were collected 
during semester break from racks 
where they had been abandoned. 
The Daily Reveille reported the 
number as 100, awaiting claims of 
owners. 

A vicious cycle? 

'* * * * 

MONEY IS THE ROOT OF ALL 
ESTABLISHMENT EVILS, as 

witness the problems of The 
Northern Star, student newspaper 
of Northern Illinois U. 

Their $60,000 budget for 1972-73 
was frozen recently by Student 
Association President Marvin 
Leavitt because the paper had 
spent $25,000 remaining in the 1971- 
72 budget to buy computerized 
equipment. 

Editor Chuck Ruch explained: 
"The ...equipment will help make 
the Star autonomous. By buying 
the equipment now with the profit 
we made on what advertisers had 
spent in our paper in previous 



years, we have saved the SA from 
having to allocate additional fees 
at a later date." 

The president of the University 
approved the Star purchase. 

An SA spokesman opined that 
"The Star got the equipment not 
necessarily because it needed the 
equipment, but to use all the 
money allocated." 

Bicker, bicker, bicker. 
*•♦• 

LONG HAIR CLIPS BARBERS at 

Indiana University, according to a 
feature piece in the Indiana Daily 
Student. 

Pointing out that ten years ago, 
eight barbers served in the campus 
barber shop. Staff Writer Kathie 
Washburn says customers had to 
wait in line, then. For the two 
barbers now on duty, "there's 
plenty of time to sit around." 

But they have hopes of a new 
short hair trend. In the 25 years the 
barbers have been shearing heads, 
"There never has been a long hair 
trend that has caused business to 
taper off like this." 

Heads up, man! 

• * * * 
WRITING IMPROVEMENT 



SERVICES at Northern Iowa U. is 
a kind of "Room to Move" that is 
familiar to UMass students. It is a 
writing drop-in center for students 
with problems in writing papers, 
essays and spelling. 

The Service is designed to tutor 
students on any writing problem or 
any writing assignments. Directed 
by a graduate student in English, it 
also administers the writing 
referral system, whereby students 
deemed deficient in writing by 
their instructions on the basis of 
assignments submitted in class, 
receive assistance. 

We read about it in The Northern 
lowan. 




"My! What a surprise!' 



KROWKCOLc Ot ESNOPSEr Ni 



LORETTA CRIER LETTERS TO 

ED. 205 

LLEWXAm m r 

?YEHT ERA TAHw DENOIT- 

NEM EREHW ON EREW DNIM 

CITSATNAF A MORF NOITAERC 

CITSATNAF A FO NOITAERC 



ER A FO NOITAERC-ER SIHT FO 
ELTIT LAUTCA DNA, ETAD 
NOITACILBUP, REHSILBUP, 
TSOC EHT TAHT DEREGNA 
TUB, SSEGRUb YNOHTNa FO 
DNIM EHT MORF EDAM KOOB 
EHT MORF EDAM EIVOM EHT 



MORF EDAM KOOB EHT FO 

NRAEL OT 

DETICXE SAW i 

:SROTIDe EHT Ot 

2791 YLUj 6 

THGIE EGAp 

EGNARo KROWKCOLc a 

REIRc EHt :Er 



Airline Passengers Just Don't Fear Hijacks 



While incidents of skyjacking continue to 
increase throughout the world, airline 
passengers are still not concerned enough to 
agree on a set of safety measures designed 
to reduce them, researchers at Ohio State 
University report. 

The study, prepared by Ohio State 
graduate students Charles E. Boltwood, 
Michael R. Cooper, Victoria E. Fein, and 
Paul V. Washburn, reveals that while 
passengers are willing to accept some 
safety measures, what these should be vary 
considerably among various sub-groups 
who fly. 

Passengers were asked to rank seven 
possible security procedures according to 
their convenience, favorability. and ef- 
voness. The seven included: 

All luggage to be transported on 
irlines should be opened and thoroughly 
. ipected prior to loading. 
2i All airline passengers should be 
before boarding. 



( 3 ) Anyone convicted of hijacking should 
face a mandatory life imprisonment sen- 
tence. 

(4) All airline personnel should be 
trained in close-quarter combat. 

(5) The laws should be altered to enable 
all airport security guards to frisk any 
passengers who they feel are suspicious 
looking. 

(H) There should be a five-percent in- 
crease in airline fares so as to finance such 
measures as locking and bullet-proofing the 
pilot's cabin. 

171 All airline stewardesses should be 
replaced with armed guards 

The researchers reported that the two 
most favorable items were ones that would 
not affect the passenger directly: Life 
imprisonment for skyjackers and a change 
in law to extend the authority of airport 
guards to frisk suspicious-looking 
passengers. Neither item directly consumed 
a passenger's time or presented an explicit 



threat of personal danger. 

As might be expected, passengers who 
were going on international or long domestic 
flights were more likely to show greater 
overall concern for security than those 
going on local flights. However, to the 
surprise of the researchers, passengers who 
flew at least once a month or more did not 
exhibit a greater overall concern for 
security. The five percent increase in airline 
fares in order to increase security was 
favored significantly more by those who 
flew less than once per month or very 
rarely. 

A further breakdown of the data revealed 
that older passengers (over 30) would favor 
changing airlines to one with more security 
and also would be willing to accept stricter 
security procedures. 

Younger passengers (under 30), on the 
other hand, indicated they would not change 
airlines for any reason they also said they 
are against frisHnp all suspi"ious-looking 



passengers, increasing airline fares, im- 
prisoning convicted hijackers for life, and 
combat training for airline personnel. 

The researchers felt these attitudes may 
be part of a general attitude prevalent 
among contemporary youth, i.e., against 
stereotypic discrimination (frisking all 
suspicious-looking people), against high 
costs (increasing airline fares), against 
extreme punishment (imprisoning 
hijackers for life), and against the im- 
plementation of violence (combat training). 

The researchers concluded that airline 
companies "simply cannot assume the 
typical passenger has an overall concern for 
security." 

One additional note: Informal male 
feedback from the survey indicated they 
saw the replacement of stewardesses with 
armed guards as a "Highly inconvenient 
procedure " 




TANGLEWOOD, LENOX, -Philadelphia Orchestra 
Music Director Eugene Ormandy conducts two 
concerts by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, July 28, 
and 29, as part of the fifth weekend of Berkshire 
Festival Concerts at Tanglewood. James Levine, 
Principal Conductor-elect of the Metropolitan Opera, 
also conducts the Boston Symphony Sunday af- 
ternoon, July 30. 

The fifth weekend opens with the Weekend Prelude 
at 7 : 00 p.m. Friday evening July 28 in the Music Shed. 
The Boston Symphony String Trio, Joseph Silverstein 
Violin, Burton Fine Viola, Jules Eskin cello, and 
Gilbert Kalish piano, present a chamber of music 
recital. Music to be performed includes Beethoven's 
String Trio in G, Op. 9, No. 1 and Brahms' Piano 
quartet in c minor, Op. 60. Weekend Prelude concerts 
are free to ticket-holders of the 9:00 p.m. Boston 
Symphony concert. 

Eugene Ormandy conducts the Boston Symphony 
at 9:00 p.m. in the Shed. The concert opens with Brah- 
ms' Tragic overture, followed by a performance of 
Sibelius' Symphony no. 5. Following intermission, the 
concert concludes with a performance of Bartok's 
Concerto for Orchestra. 

Saturday morning, July 29, James Levine leads the 



Orchestra's fifth Open Rehearsal of the season. 
Music to be rehearsed will include music of the 
following Sunday afternoon concert. Open Rehear- 
sals, held each Saturday morning during the 
Berkshire Festival at 10:30 a.m. offer a relaxed look 
at the conductors, soloists and Boston Symphony 
rehearsing music for the Berkshire Festival con- 
certs. Tickets are $2.50 each, on sale at the Festival 
Ticket Office two hours before the beginning of the 
rehearsal. 

Saturday evening, July 29, at 8:30 p.m., Eugene 
Ormandy again conducts the Boston Symphony. 
Music to be performed includes Beethoven's Leonore 
overture, no. 3, Hindemith's symphony Mathis der 
Maler, and, following intermission, a performance of 
Strauss' Ein Heldenleben (A Hero's life) with Boston 
Symphony Concertmaster Joseph Silverstein as 
violin soloist. 

Sunday afternoon, July 30 at 2:30 p.m. in the Shed, 
James Levine conducts the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra with Joseph Silverstein again the violin 
soloist. The concert opens with Mozart's Fourth violin 
concerto with Mr. Silverstein the violin soloist, and 
following intermission, Mr. Levine conducts the first 
Berkshire Festival performance of Mahler's Sym- 
phony no. 6. 



Angela Lansbury at Storrowton 



WEST SPRINGFIELD -Angela 
Lansbury will recreate her Tony 
Award-winning role as "Mame" 
for one week only at Storrowton 
Theatre beginning Monday, July 
31. 

Joining Miss Lansbury on the 
round Storrowton stage will be 
many of the members of the 
original Broadway cast, who 
prompted Life Magazine to herald 
the show as "Broadway's Best 
Musical." 

Miss Lansbury was the star who 
brought the Jerome Lawrence, 
Robert E. Lee, and Jerry Herman 
musical, based upon the Patrick 
Dennis gook "Auntie Mame," to 
Broadway in 1966. 

Jane Connell will be featured as 
Agnes Gooch, the myopic 
secretary; Anne Francine will 
recreate her role as Vera Charles; 
and Willard Waterman will be seen 
as Dwight Babcock. Charles 
Braswell will be featured as 
Beauregard Jackson Pickett 
Burnside and Sab Shimono will be 
seen as Ito. 

The production, directed by John 
Bowab, features in addition to the 
title song, such memorable hits as 
"If He Walked Into My Life," "It's 



Turtles For Peace 

ATHENS, Greece — Greece will 
export 21 tons of turtles to 
European countries from August to 
September, the Economy Ministry 
said. It said it did not know 
whether the turtles were ordered 
for soup, meat or the shells. 

N.Y. Post Against 
Eagleton 

NEW YORK-The New York Post 
called on Sen. Thomas F. Eagleton 
in an editorial today to step down 
as the Democratic candidate for 
vice president. 

The Post has supported 
Democratic and liberal candidates 
in the past. 



Today," "Bosom Buddies," "Open 
A New Window," and "My Best 
Girl." 

Miss Lansbury is a double Tony 
Award Winner. She received her 
first Tony with "Mame," and her 
second came when she starred as 
Countess Aurelia in the musical 
"Dear World." 



Tickets for this great Broadway 
musical and all the other 
Storrowton Theatre attractions are 
available at the Storrowton box 
office located at the site of the 
orange and green tent on the 
Exposition grounds or by calling 
732-1101 in the Greater Springfield 
area. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Eagleton 

He said he feels no need for a 
psychiatric examination now and 
wouldn't submit to one unless 
McGovern, President Nixon and 
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew did, 
too. 

He also refused to permit the 
release of his hospital records but 
left open the possibility he would 
allow his former doctors to discuss 
treatment they gave him. 

He said he receives no 
medication now except for "an 
occasional, very sporadic 
tranquilizer. I don't even know the 
name of it." 

Eagleton had said Tuesday he 
would have no further comment on 
his medical history in the cam- 
paign. But Wednesday he said he 
had reconsidered and will try to 
educate the public about the kind of 
problems he encountered in the 
past. 

He said, however, that the 
hospital records were private "and 
it is my intention mat they so 
remain." 

Although professional ethics 
prevent physicians from publicly 
discussing matters regarding 
patients, Eagleton said, he will talk 
to his doctors within the next few 
days and "discuss with them what 
should be said." 

He said he would telephone the 

'SPORTSLINE' 

On SPORTSLINE this Sunday 
night Marty Kelly will host a 
discussion with New England 
Patriot wide receiver Randy 
Vatahah, Huby Bryant and top 
draft choice Tom Reynolds. 
SPORTSLINE is on Sunday night 
at 10 P.M. over WMI!A, 91.1 F M. 



doctors after he returns Thursday 
from Hawaii where he was invited 
to address a meeting of the AFL- 
CIO Retail Clerks Union. 

Eagleton said his staff had 
discussed his medical history 
"generally" with McGovern's staff 
earlier but that the presidential 
nominee "didn't know the com- 
plete details until yesterday". 

He said McGovern had been told 
before that "Tom Eagleton has on 
occasion suffered from exhaustion 
and fatigue which manifested itself 
in depression". 

Eagleton insisted that since 1966 
"I've experienced good, sound, 
solid health". The 42-year-old 
Eagleton added, "as a younger 
man, I must say, I drove myself too 
far". 

Since 1966, he said, he has set a 
slower pace for himself and makes 
a point of relaxing on Sundays with 
his family. 

Even during his bouts with 
nervous exhaustion and 
depression, his ability to make 
rational decisions was unimpaired, 
he stated. 

He flatly denied that alcohol had 
any connection with the hospital 
stays and branded as untrue 
rumors that he has had a drinking 
problem. 



DOUBLE FEATURE FILM SERIES 



Marlon Brando 
in 

On The 
Waterfront 



Tk$ Guns 
of Man mi 



7 p.m. ' ^y^ Starring 

Gregory Peck, David Niven, Anthony Quinn 

Sponsored by Summer Program Council 

Student Union Bait, oom 
August 2, Wednesday 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 



leerfitld iriw e-ln 
Theatre 

Routes* if 

South Deerf leld, Massachusetts 

Tol.US-e74t 

NOW— ENDS TUES. 



dr.phibes 
Irises again! 



I VJ NCENT PRICL 
J* 

| HORROR WILL HOLD YOU 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Three 

Japanese 
Women Sexier 



TOKYO-There was a time when 
Japanese women were so sensitive 
about the shape of their legs that 
any man who valued a girl's 
friendship would never mention 
them. No more. 

Girls now flaunt their legs and 
sometimes more-in mini-skirts and 
hot pants, the leg watchers are 
delighted. 

The shape has changed from the 
days critics considered the legs of 
Japanese girls too short, too heavy 
and, some added unchivalrously, 
to hairy. 

Prof. Yoshiyasu Nakao of the 
National College of Fine Arts in 
Tokyo has spent years studying 
Japanese legs. He says a high 
protein diet and Western living 
habits popular since Wor w War II 

In Qie past, says' Nakao, the 
Japanese lived on a high-starch 
diet and women spent hours 
squatting on straw-matted floors. 
Today they sit more in chairs, eat 
Western foods, and-like Western 





I MKRICAN INTERNATIONAL NlMM "Jf 
* 1972 Amrictn international Pictures. Inc 

Dr. Phlbes Show First 
Wed., Thur., Sun., Mon., Tues. 



women-are more active in sports 
which help tone their muscles. 

"All this has given us girls with 
better figures," says Nakao, who is 
50. 

Japanese girls today are roughly 
one inch taller than their mothers. 
The extra height, Nakao says, 
comes from longer legs and little 
change in torsos. 

"The torso of a Japanese girls is 
bottom-heavy but the longer legs 
have made this less prominent," 
he observes. 

Several Japanese girls have won 
recognition in international beauty 
contests, but some countrymen 
consider them exceptions-that 
their legs still are no match for 
those Western or other Asian girls. 
But they think time will correct 
this. 

Conscious of their shaplier legs, 
girls now cling to hot pants and 
miniskirts with a passion, braving 
goose pimples in winter. Police say 
sex molesters have become more 
active with the shorter fashions. 



British Strike 
Fizzles 



LONDON-Britain's con- 
troversial Industrial Relations 
Court today ordered the release of 
five jailed stevedores, thus 
heading off a national protest 
strike that had been set for Mon- 
day. 



ficial picketing in a dock dispute 
between unionists over who-does- 
what. 

Wildcat strikes swept the 
country in the wake of the arrest of 
the longshoremen. 



The nation's ports shut down, its 
The Development capped four main newspapers did not appear, 
days of mounting industrial tension industry slowed, transportation 
that brought the country's seething services were disrupted and food 
labor movement into confrontation i supplies were dislocated. 
with Prime Minister Edward ■P""^"»^^» B ^""» BBBBB ^"^" BB " 
Heath's Conservative government. 1 A night of 

1 SUPER FLICKS 



But while averting Britain's first 
general strike since 1926, the 
judgement of the court did nothing 
to resolve or remove the un- 
derlying causes of Britain's in- 
dustrial unrest. 



Imprisonment of the five 
stevedores last Friday on grounds 
of contempt followed their defiance 
of the court's order to quit unof- 



LAUREL& HARDY 

.BETTY BOOP 

.ABBOTT & COSTELLO 

.PROPAGANDA FILM 

NEWSR EELS AND 

MUSICALS OF THE '40'S 

.FELIX THE CAT AND 

OTHER CARTOON GREATS 

.CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

.LOTS MORE FUN FILMS 

FRIDAY — JULY 28 — 8:15 



AMHERST FOLKLORE CENTRE 




Thursday, July 27, 1972-8:00 P.M. 
HAIGIS MALL 
University of Massachusetts 




7 AK>p.r 
wHh LD.'» ! 



THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1972 



THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Five 



Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 

UMass Press - - Part III 



High Quality Limitations 



By LISA CASTILLO 

A recent article on university 
presses was appropriately entitled 
"Scholarly Publishing Lives! (sort 
of". This two-part title which 
appeared in Publishers Weekly 
expresses both a victorious pride of 
life and a painful reminder of the 
many limitations of a university 
press. 

The UMass press is but a "twig 
on the branch on the vine" of book 
publishing. In 1969 alone, a 
recorded 498,000 books came into 
the world (over half of what it took 
the UMass library to accummulate 
in 109 years). Not only is there a 
soaring increase in the amount of 
books being written, but literally 
millions of articles and volumes of 
unpublished work which only a 
handful of people will ever read. 

The situation can be somewhat 
disconcerting, especially for the 
author. According to author and 
poet, Robert Francis of Amherst, 
published by the UMass Press, it 
can be "very disillusioning to go 
into a second-hand bookstore, 
particularly a cheap one and see 
tons of books that nobody now 
wants. The thought is bound to 
come to you; am I going to add one 
more book to this mountain? Well, 
the hope is that any book you write 
will have some permanent value." 

Francis considers it a pleasure to 
be associated with the UMass 



Press. "The fact that they are 
interested in my work, in my 
future work, that whatever I write 
they'll be interested in, has given 
me a lot of encouragement." 
Having done business with a big 
commercial publishing house, 
Francis comments that with them, 
"I don't have that assurance. I 
never had a personal relation with 
them", as commercial publishing 
houses are too big to operate on a 
personal basis. 

Henry Irving Tragle had a 
similar experience of personal 
concern. A Virginian, sincerely 
interested in history, Tragle was 
"disgusted and fascinated" with 
William Styron's "historical" 
account of the slave revolt in 
Styron's book, The Confessions of 
Nat Turner. Tragle launched into 
the task of unearthing and 
examining tremendous amounts of 
data which according to Styron's 
findings, was little enough to be 
read all in one day. 

After sixteen trips to the 
Southampton area, many con- 
versations with informed in- 
dividuals and untold hours of 
pouring over primary source 
material and preparing the 
evidence, Tragle invested three 
intense years to this investigation. 

Convinced that he would be 
"served well" by the UMass Press, 



he left the manuscript, The 
Southampton Slave Revolt of 1831: 
A Compilation of Source Material, 

in their hands. Once again the 
endless cycle of publishing books 
was about to begin another 
revolution. Working in close 
cahoots with the author and ex- 
cited about Tragle's work, the 
press was ready to take on Mr. 
Styron, an attitude uncommon to 
larger publishing establishments. 

At the completion of the book, 
Tragle was, "very satisfied with 
the book as it was made". Richard 
Hendle's design was its usual; 
fresh innovative. The book 
received favorable reviews and 
releases. According to a New York 
Times Review of Books, "It should 
be said at once that he has 
produced the most important 
single work ever published on the 
Turner rebellion." 



As an evidence of the presses 
commitment to Gragle's book, top 
billing was given to the work in 
their sales catalogue along with an 
unusually large amount of 
resources put forth to promote the 
work. 

To satisfy his curiosity and in 
character with his wont towards 
meticulous investigation, Tragle 
undertook another research 
project; this time with a goal of 



calculating the potential mileage 
of his work. 

After all is tolled, the effects of 
red tape, economics and those 
approximate 500,000 other books on 
the market are no longer statistics 
in a Wall Street Journal or a 
library reference book, but real 
entities that have a real effect on 
the real world. 

University presses are very 
concerned with the sales and 
promotion of their books. At the 
1970 session of the American 
Association of University Presses, 
it was concluded that "the 
bookstore does not occupy a major 
place in the world of university 
press publishing. A representative 
of the Harvard University Press 
said, "A publisher will never know 
whether an advertisement in the 
meeting program is important 
until an academic walks into the 
publishers booth with various titles 
checked off." 



and effort from making individual 
exhibits. 

It was determined that in- 
dividual sales and the results of 
book reviews were the most 
fruitful for university presses. 

It is to the end of getting 
scholarly work into the hands of 
interested readers that university 
presses operate. Despite the 
limitations of the UMass Press and 
the ever-growing world market, 
Francis says, "I feel very for- 
tunate to be published by the 
UMass Press principally for two 
reasons: One, the high quality of 
their work-and that goes for every 
department -and second, because 
we are in the same town and we 
consult face to face." 

Fisher 
Retains 



Said another delegate of the 
conference, "expenses are 
growing at a rate faster than 
sales." University presses are 
coming up with some efficient new 
sales tactics. For example, three 
southern universities have banded 
together in an exhibition thrust 
called "Tri-press". They represent 
each other in concert book 
exhibits. Thus all are saved time 



Lead 



REYKJAVIK-The seventh-title 
game between world chess 
champion Boris Spassky and 
American challenger Bobby 
Fischer ended in a draw Wed- 
nesday after less than an hour's 
play. Fischer retained the match 
lead 4-3. 



Drugs Use May Be Learned 

From Parents 



An extensive study of teenage 
drug use has produced evidence 
that drug taking is a form of 
learned behavior handed down 
from parent to child. 

Parents who regularly use mood- 
changing drugs, including alcohol 
and tobacco, may unintentionally 
pass on to offspring an attitude 
favoring drug experimentation, a 
team of Canadian psychologists 
has found. 

In a two year study of drug use 
among 8,865 high school students in 
Toronto, the psychologists 
collected student responses in- 
dicating a positive link between 
parental drug use and the 
frequency and amount of drugs 
used by their children. 

The research project was un- 
dertaken by the Alcoholism and 
Drug Addiction Research Foun- 
dation, Toronto, Canada, to help 
behavioral scientists gain a better 
understanding of the underlying 
causes of drug abuse in order to 
combat it more effectively. 

Data were gathered from 
questionnaires distributed to a 
cross-section of city and suburban 
students in school in 1970 revealing 
that for each five separate drugs 
used by parents, their children 
were also more likely to be users. 
Furthermore, the information 
indicated that youthful drug users 
who learn to turn to drugs by 
parental use most often try a 
variety of psycho-active and 
frequently illegal drugs. 



The research findings were 
presented in an article by Dr. 
Reginald G. Smart and Dianne 
Fejer in the Journal of Abnormal 
Psychology published by the 
American Psychological 
Association. 

The authors state that the study, 
as well as other recent research 
tracing the relationship of parental 
and child drug use, was gradually 
eroding the long-held belief that 
turning on with drugs arises from a 
"generation gap" or youthful 
defiance. 

Smart and Fejer expressed 
worry that many parents may be 
blind to the possibility that their 
own drug-taking patterns may 
influence their children. Depen- 
dence on alcohol or tobacco may 
not be considered as a contributing 
factor in shaping children's at- 
titudes toward drugs by many 
parents, but psychologists are 
turning up more evidence to affirm 
the hazards of their use. 

The percentage of students who 
reported using tobacco, 
marijuana, barbiturates, heroin, 
speed, LSD, and other mind- 
affecting drugs was lowest if the 
parents used neither tobacco or 
alcohol. Mothers who smoked and 
drank frequently were most likely 
to have their children turn to illicit 
and stronger drugs, the study 
indicated. 

Students who reported their 
parents to be regular users of 
tranquilizers (the survey was 



confidential) were twice as likely 
to smoke marijuana, three times 
as likely to use hallucinatory 
drugs, and times as likely to follow 
the example of drug use set in their | 
households. 

Dr. Smart and other, 
psychologists doing drug research 
conclude that until the underlying 
causes of drug abuse can be 
spotted for treatment, adults as 
well as children need to be 
educated about drugs. 

Be a Harrington 
Volunteer? 

Congressman Michael J. 
Harrington announced recently 
that he is interested in any students 
who might want to work full-time 
in Washington for the rest of the 
summer, or for the Fall or Spring 
semester. 

These interns would be working 
in Harrington's Washington office 
answering constituent letters, 
drafting legislation writing 
statements and releases, and at- 
tending regular hearings and 
sessions of Congress. 

They are volutary positions, 
however. For any further in- 
formation, contact either 
Congressman Harrington or Miss 
Christine Sullivan, 435 Cannon 
House Office Building, 

Washington, DC. 20515 or call 202- 
225-8020. 



Free Booklet 
Available 



FREE "Off Campus Ac- 
tivities" 

Pamphlets now available at 
the reception desk of the 
Student Activities Office. 



Letters 



I 



Yes, do send in your comments 
on campus life, international af 
fairs, national emergencies, etc 
All we demand is that all letters to- 
the-editor be typed on a sixty-spa 
line, one side of each page, double 
spaced. 



FOLK CONCERT 

Leo Lotthe 

Bill Stains 
WliUe Cataldo 

Tuesday at the 
Metawampe Lawn 

Sponsored by Summer Program Council 



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Campus Flowers Stand Out 



Through weeks of saturating and sky-darkening 
rains, bright spots have stood out on the UMass 
campus. 

Twelve beds of geraniums, petunias, and marigolds 
were planted this spring in cooperation with the 
University's first female laborer, and first 
floriculturist. 

Miss Debbie Newhouse, a June graduate of the 
UMass Stockbridge School of Agriculture, says ap- 
plying for the job as UMass floriculturist had nothing 
to do with women's rights. "I didn't do it for women's 



lib or anything. I just wanted a job," she says. 

Her job has been to plant and maintain the hun- 
dreds of annual flowers in beds near eight university 
buildings. When cold weather sets in, Debbie, a 19- 
year-old from Andover, will work in campus 
greenhouses cultivating flowers for next spring and 
summer. Most of the flowers she's planted this year 
were greenhouse-grown on campus, according to Mr. 
Kenton Billings, superintendent of grounds. 

Trees and shrubs have also been planted as part of 
the campus beautification project of the physical 
plant department. 



U.Y.A. Plans Training Program 
For New Phase III Students 



A training conference beginning 
Aug. 1 will usher in the second year 
of the UMass volunteer student 
social action program University 
Year for Action. 

The conference will run through 
Aug. 20 and will be devoted 
primarily to orientation and 
training for the 65 Phase HI 
students entering the program this 
year. Included will be a review and 
evaluation of the past year's 



program. 

University Year for Action 
enables UMass students to devote 
themselves to a full year of° 
volunteer social action work, and 
to receive up to 36 academic credit 
hours. It is a cooperative program 
sponsored and supported by Ac- 
tion, the new federal agency which 
combines VISTA, the Peace Corps 
and other volunteer agencies. 

Some 80 students were in Phase I 
and II of the program last year, 
working in 31 social and com- 



Old West Marvels 
In C.C. Auditorium 



Miss Debbie Newhouse, first female laborer at the University of 
Massachusetts-Amherst, arranges geraniums in a heart-shaped 
flower bed near the UMass School of Education building. Debbie, a 
June graduate of the UMass Stockbridge School of Agriculture, is 
also the first campus floriculturist. Looking on are other members of 
the flower-planting crew: Albert DiCarlo of Northampton, kneeling; 
and Damon Cook of Worcester, a UMass undergraduate studying 
plant and soil sciences. 



RADIOLOGIC 
TECHNOLOGISTS 

Part T ime openings available in 
modern progressive department 
of teaching hospital, for 
registered or eligible 

technologists. 

7:30a.m. -11:30a.m. 
12 Noon 4:00p.m. 

5 day week including alternating 

Saturdays. 

8 a.m. 4 p.m. Saturday and/or 

Sunday 

Apply in 
Personnel Department 
SPRINGFIELD HOSPITAL 

HOSPITAL 

MEDICAL CENTER 

75? Chestnut Street 

Springfield 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



UMASS SUMMER THEATRE 

OPENING TONIGHT 

An Evening of Farces and Song 

TO HAPPY MARRIAGE 
and FAITHFUL WIVES 

STUDIOTHEATRE SOUTH COLLEGE 
JULY 27-29 & Aug. 3-5 8:30 P.M. 

Reservations call 545-2579 

or tickets at Bartleft Box Office 

$.50 UMass Students s/summer ID 
$1.00 General Public 




An Exhibition 

Paintings by 
Al Smith 

Opening July 31-7:00 p.m. 

Campus Center 
Music Listening Room 

Sponsored by 
Summer Program Council 



The Child 
ShownToday 

The "Child", a Swedish child- ' 
birth film, will be shown Thursday, 
July 27, at 1 p.m. in the Campus 
Center, Room 162. The film is being 
sponsored by the Health Services 
and is open to the public without 
charge. 



Saloons, gunfights, weddings, 
tornadoes, births, and violent 
deaths are only a few of the in- 
cidents in the story theatre 
production of "Marvels of the Old 
West!" to be performed free of 
charge at 8:00 p.m. in the Campus 
Center Auditorium on Sunday, July 
30, and Sunday, August 6. 

A production of Summer 
Theatre, the show is compiled of 
folklore and fiction, memoirs and 
records of the old American west. 
It was compiled by Robert and 
Bonnie Bishoff, and directed by 
Bonnie Bishoff. The assistant 
director is Cathy Williams and the 
cast includes Jeff Scotland, Eric 
Stocker, Ned Daly, Mary Torras, 
Bill Vandergrift, Lix Thompson, 
Bob Andrews, Eileen Daly, Katy 
Corea, Al Rimbach, and Kimberli 



Wagner. 

Story theatre is a somewhat 
experimental venture which at- 
tempts to create a theatrical ex- 
perience from non-dramatic 
material. The show is a fast-paced, 
almost cinematic romp including 
songs, dances, and an old- 
fashioned Keystone Cops Chase! 
Bring the kids! It's free and air- 
conditioned! Seating is imited and 
tickets are available at the 
Campus Center Information Booth. 



munity agencies. They assisted at 
Belchertown and other state 
hospitals, tutored at Hampshire 
County Jail, offered community 
legal assistance in Holyoke and 
Springfield, worked at community 
and neighborhood centers in 
Springfield and Worcester, 
assisted at the Westfield Detention 
Center, and did a variety of other 
jobs. 

The Phase III students will work 
during the coming academic year 
in 20 social and health agencies 
from Leominister to North Adams. 
Some will be in hospitals, some in 
schools, some in jails, others in 
community centers and others in 
urban planning offices. 

At the training conference, the 
first four days will be spent at the 
University, with briefings given by 
University Year for Action staff, 
Washington representatives of the 
Action program, UMass faculty 
and agency staff. From Aug. 5 
through 18 the student volunteers 
will be trained by the 20 agencies. 
They will return to campus for 
final training sessions Aug. 19 and 
20. On-campus sessions will be held 
at the Campus Center and students 
will be housed in Cashin House. 



CHAMPION TERMPAPERS 
636 Beacon Street (#405) 
Boston, Mass. 02215 
Research Material for Term- 
papers, Reports, Theses, etc. 
Lowest Prices, Same Day Service. 
For information, write or call (417) 
536-9700. 





THE MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE 
SUMMER THEATRE 

proudly presents 
the hilarious British farce 



SEE HOW THEY RUN 



Tues. - Sat., July 25 - 29 at 8:30 p.m. 
Tickets $2.50 and $3.50 
students $ 1 off any ticket 

■OX OFFICE open 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Daily Exctpt Sunday 
Phone (413) 538-2406 



COMING: 



luv August 1-5 



Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BRANDYWINE *s 
beautiful new one and two bedroom model apartments. 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few 
minutes we'll show you all the reasons in the world why 
BRANDYWINE is a better place to live. We invite you 
to compare features and compare prices. The few 
minutes you spend with our two beautiful models could 
be the most important minutes you'll spend all year. 




Conveniences which make BRANDYWINE so 
eminently 'livable" include: 

Spacious, well laid out units 

All brand name, house sized appliances 

An abundance of closet space 

Individually controlled, central gas heat, air- 
conditioning and cooking included in rent 

Extra soundproofing and security features 

Large, partially enclosed, private patios and 
balconies 

Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 

Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager responsible 
for all apartment services and maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam Furniture 
Leasing Company, Hartford, Connecticut 

One Bedroom Units from $200 
Two Bedroom Units from $225 




BRANDYWINE at Amherst 



50 MEADOW STREET 

AMHERST 

549-0600 



THURSDAY, JULY 27. 1972 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page Seven 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crltr 



THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1972 




A bicycle race for men and women will be held on Tuesday, August 1st at 7:00 
p.m. The races will begin at the stadium road. All participants may sign-up at the 
Intramurals Office-Boyden #215 or at the site of the race just prior to starting time. 
Two separate races will be run, one for men (1.7 miles) and one for women (1.0 
miles) . The races are open to summer students, faculty, and staff. 

HEW Announces Library Grants 



Basic, supplemental, and 
special-purpose grants announced 
today by HEW's Office of 
Education will assist 522 of the 
Nation's higher- education in- 
stitutions in the acquisition of 
library materials. 

Totaling approximately $11 
million, the grants were awarded 
under Title II-A of the Higher 
Education Act of 1965 for the im- 
provement of college and 
university libraries located in every 
State, the District of Columbia, 
Puerto Rico, the Trust Territory of 
the Pacific Islands, and the Virgin 
Islands. 

More than $9.3 million of the total 
is in basic and supplemental funds 
that went to institutions having 
serious deficiencies in their library 
collections. Unlike the sup- 
plemental grants, however, the 
basic grants require institutional 
matching funds. The recipients are 
junior and community colleges, 
new and developing institutions, 
postsecondary vocational schools, 
and colleges and universities with 
significant enrollments of 
economically disadvantaged 
students. 

Included in the awards an- 
nounced today is a total of $1.6 
million for three categories of 
special-purpose grants: $650,000 to 
institutions in urban areas with a 
high concentration of economically 
disadvantaged students; $180,000 
for those having extensive 



collections that meet the special 
needs of other institutions in 
socially and economically 
deprived communities, and 
$820,000 for combinations of in- 
stitutions needing special 
assistance in establishing or 
strengthening joint-use facilities. 

Grant funds awarded under Title 
II-A of the Higher Education Act 
are used by institutions of higher 
education only for the acquisition 
of library materials such as books, 
periodicals, documents, magnetic 
tapes, phonograph records, 
catalog records, and other printed 
and audiovisual materials suitable 



War Sues Eric Burton, Others 



War, the rock group has filed suit counting and other relief 
against War Productions, Inc., 
Jerry Goldstein, Far Out 
Productions, Inc., Steve Gold, Eric 
Burton, Liberty /United Artists, 
Inc. and others to set aside con- 
tracts of employment, production, 
songwriting and recording. The 
suit was filed in the Superior Court 
of Los Angeles County and also 
asks for money damages, an ac 



War is taking the position that 
its' contracts with the above 
corporations and persons are 
terminated, and the group is free to 
deal with others. 



The PLACE THAT MADE 
AMHERST FAMOUS 
DRAKE RESTAURANT 

Village Inn 

RATHSKELLAR 
85 AMITY 253 2548 



2 

< 

i 

< 



LU 

a. 
o 



5-College 

Info 
545-2566 



You get results with our Classifieds 



Crier Classifieds 



INSERTION ORDER 



Women's Mile Run 
Tonight At Track 

^^By TOM DERDERIAN 

Charlotte Lettis, co-director of the Sugarloaf track meets, announced 
that a special novice women's mile run will be held Thursday at 7:00 p.m. 
at the UMass track. The run is open to all women who have not run faster 
than six minutes for the mile. Women who have never raced are en- 
couraged to try this race. Trophies will be awarded to the first three to 
finish. 

Other events will include a 100 yard dash, 220 yards, 440 yards, 880 
yards, one mile, and two mile runs, and a mile walk. Starting time is 6:30 
p.m. and will continue throughout the summer. 

Some of last week's winners were : Glen Stone of Northampton, who ran 
4:40 and 9:56 in the mile and two mile runs, Seth Rockwell in the mile 
walk at 10:08, Tom Currie in the 440 at 0:53, and Kathy Wilson in the 
"little kids" 440. Bob Slate won the 100 yard dash. 

VegetableOil Propels 
Texas Invented Auto 



for library resources. 

Since the inception of the College 
Library Resources Program in 
Fiscal Year 1966, more than $111.4 
million through 11,411 grants has 
been made available to institutions 
of higher education. These awards 
will have resulted in the 
acquisition of approximately 12.5 
million library volumes. 

Massachusetts will receive 
seven basic grants totaling $35,000, 
seven supplemental grants totaling 
$88,276 and two special purpose 
grants totaling $62,000. The grand 
total of $185,276 will be split bet- 
ween eight institutions. 



FLOWER MOUND, 
Tex— Richard Clem claims that if 
the automobile industry would 
adopt his new invention, the 
American motorist would change 
the oil in his car only every 150,000 
miles and in between not buy any 
gas. 

That might come as a shock to 
Detroit and the petroleum in- 
dustry, but Clem, a heavy 
equipment operator for the city of 
Dallas and a spare time inventor, 
said he has discovered what french 
fries and hash browns have known 
for years— that vegetable oil is a 



50° each insertion 



Client 



DATES TO RUN 



Heodline 



ADVERTISING COPY 















1 




































































































































































































































i 

























hot product. 

He said his motor— much of 
which he won't divulge— uses eight 
gallons of vegetable oil for fuel. 

"Engineers have told me this 
can't work," Clem said, laughing. 
"I only know it does. It will do 
someone some good and will help 
keep the air clean." 

His motor is mounted in a bright 
red car but he said if it is made 
large enough, "this type of engine 
could power ships, aircraft, even 
provide enough power to produce 
enough electricity for large cities. 



CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED 



FOR SALE 



Thunderbird, (Ford) '67, 
Landau 4 dr. at/ps/pb, powr 
wndws. New exhaust many 
other features, excel, cond. 
$1250. Call 532-9309 (Holyoke). 

22" Black & White TV $45., 21" 
Color TV $150. TELEVISION 
CENTER, 55 North Pleasant St. 
Amherst, 2nd Floor, #253-5100. 

8/15 

KAWASAKI 350 CC 68 only 8800 
miles, very fast, perfect running 
condition. Call Rick 549-0384 
$400 or best offer. 

7/27 

FOR SALE CHEAP — 1965 Olds 
442 Body Rough Engine Good 
Runs Strong $200 549 6079. 

8/1 

1971 Ford Torino Squire Station 
Wagon V-8, power brakes, 
power steering, gray gold — 
3,000 miles. Best Offer. Call 
253 5641. 

8/15 

1964 Chevrolet Impala Con- 
vertible, good condition, contact 
Larry at 549-6676 or leave 
message at Crier office. 



FOR RENT 



EFF. AND2 1/2-rm.apts. furn., 
all utils., parking, pool, 9-mo. 
lease avail, from Sept. 1. Reas. 
rent Amherst Motel opp. 
Zayre's. 

8/15 

ROOM in private home in Athol 
for quiet-type grad student — 
male. Tel (617) -249-4087 
evenings. 

7/27 

Female wanted Sept. 1st to 
share room in apartment across 
street from Puffton Village. 
Approximately 65/mo., utilities 
included. Call Donna 549-0130 — 
keep trying. 

7/27 



NOTICES 



GAYS, wishing to meet others, 
come to 911 CCtonite(Thurs.) at 
7:30 or call Student Homophile 
League 5 0154. 

8/20 



Please insert one character, space, or punctuation mark per box. 



1969 MGB low mileage; 6 radial 
tires; AM radio; overdrive; 
reasonable offers only; call 
after 8:30 p.m. nightly or 
anytime on weekends; 253-7464. 

8/1 

1970 Kawasaki Bighorn 350cc, 
great bike for street or trail. 
Very good condition, must sell 
immediately. Call 549-6820. 

8/3 

Portable Reming Typewriter 
with RUSSIAN keys. $50. Call 
John Basile 1 734 1655 between 5 
6 p.m. 

8/1 



FNTFPTAIMMI^J 

A NIGHT OF -SUPER 
FLICKS— ABBOTT & 

COSTELLO, BETTY BOOP, 
LAUREL & HARDY, OLD 
NEWS REELS, PROPAGANDA 
FILMS, CHAPLIN, 8. MORE! 
FRIDAY, JULY 28, AMHERST 
FOLKLORE CENTER, 8:15. 

7/27 

hfipwaw tfh 

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS — 
Participate in experiment at 
UMass. Earn $4 for 2 hours 
work. Call Rebecca Warren 
between 4 & 7 p.m. at 256 6456. 

8/8 



You are most welcomed to come 
every Tuesday at 7 p.m. for an 
informal gathering of The 
Christian Science College 
Organization. Hear how Truth 
and Love unfold good for all. 
Campus Center 809. 

8/15 

Introductory lecture on Tran- 
scendental Meditation. Offered 
by Sims (UMass) on Thurs., 
July 27th at 8 p.m. in Rm. 805-809 
Campus Center. 

7/27 



Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $185/M incl utilities. Call 
Resident Mgr 665 4239, if no 
answer 1-786-0500. 

8/15 



PERSONAL 



FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
.List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207-T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

Tennis lessons by experienced 
instructor. Easy way to learn. 
Good fundamental for beginners 
and intermediates. Sl/lesson 
665 3205. 

JACK — It won't be a long one — 
Happy Birthday. THE SEN- 
SUOUS ONES. 

AVOID an automotive RIP- 
OFF. No charge for estimates 
on repairs. All work guaranteed, 
at Spencer's Mobil 161 N. 
Pleasant St. (next to P.O.) 253- 
9050. 



Index Survives As Some Yearbooks Fold 



While many college yearbooks 
are folding or threatening to fold, 
the UMass "Index" is 400 pages 
year, due to a 
to recruiting 



novel 
staff 



strong this 

approach 

members. 

The 1970 "Directory of the 
College Student Press in America" 
listed 1,545 college yearbooks, of 
which an estimated five percent 
have either folded this year or will 



next year, according to "Direc- 
tory" editor Dario Politella, 
UMass professor of English. Dr. 
Politella attributes the yearbook 
foldings to problems of finance or 
student apathy toward working on 
the books. 

But at UMass, "Index" editor 
Walter Sobzak managed this year 
to devote more than 50 percent of 
the 400-page book to text, much of 



"Super Flicks" 
at Folklore Centre 



Have you ever had a tour of New 
York City in the early 40's? Do you 
remember Betty Boop, Farmer 
Alfalfa, Felix the Cat? As a kid did 
you ever used to watch Abbott and 
Costello. or Woody Woodpecker? 
Well, these and other nostalgic 
goodies are to be shown in a very 
special night of "Super Flicks," 
this Friday evening at the Amherst 
Folklore Centre. 

Also included in the program will 
be two Charlie Chaplin classics, 
and two Government propaganda 
films from WW II : one a Hollywood 



production starring Susan 
Hayward, the other featuring the 
Vice-President in a dramatic plea 
to fight imperialism. Musical 
sketches from the Swing Era, a 
trip through Darkest Africa, a 
newsreel and Laurel and Hardy 
also will be highlighted. 

This varied show promises to 
please most everyone. Scheduled 
for this Friday evening, July 28, 
the entertainment starts at 8:15. 
The Folklore Centre is located at 16 
Spring Street in Amherst, just 
behind the Lord Jeff. 



which is from essays on subjects of 
campus-wide interest. He 
arranged for a magazine writing 
class, taught by Dr. Politella, to 
submit the essays. 
"The result," he says, "is a 

baker's dozen pieces, including one 
from Prof. Politella. The teacher, 
who wrote "Campus Humor Is 
Where You Find It," is the author 
of the 1971 book, "The Illustrated 
Anatomy of Campus Humor." 



Articles by students include 
reports on "Crime On The Cam- 
pus," by Linda Roth; parking 
problems, "The Great Car 
Crunch." by Robert Soule; and off- 
campus watering places, by Ray 
Blais. 



Freshman Jerald Lazar con- 
tributed a 2,000-word review of 
"Coed Living: They Tried It and 
Liked It." Other articles deal with 
sex on the campus, by Barbara 
Lemoine, the resignation of UMass 
Chancellor Oswald Tippo, by J. 
Lazar; the first year of the 18-year- 



old vote in Amherst, by Carl 
Greenberg; the UMass Athletic 
Council debate, by Anne Gurnett; 
and the new federally sponsored 
University Year for Action 
program, by Anne Stadnicki. 

The UMass "Index" is one of the 
largest college yearbooks in the 



United States, circulation-wise; 
and in 1971 was the third largest in 
relation to budget and circulation. 
It is printed for each UMass un- 
dergraduate, not just seniors. 
Undergraduate enrollment at 
UMass last spring semester was 
16,000. 



Crossword Puzzle 



Inside Astrology 



By MADELEINE MONNET 
STELLAR PROFILE: ROSE KEN- 
NEDY 

As one of the most remarkable and 
admired women taking part in our 
national tableau. Rose Kennedy exem 
plifies the power of the land that rocks the 
cradle. The guiding feminine force behind 
the Kennedy family, she has carried 
herself with quiet dignity through 
triumphs and tragedies. There are few 
women, executive or otherwise, who have 
cast so long a shadow over our modern 
day scene. . 

At age 82 on July 22, Rose still radiates 
beauty, strength and charm. Born on 
what we call the cusp, she is a blend of 
compassionate, home loving Cancer and 
the regal, aggressive sign of Leo. This 
combination allows her the talent of being 
a queen in her home and at court. 

The best and worst of heavenly patterns 
are in Rose's chart. A Grand Trine, 
considered to be the most spiritual and 
lucky signature to be found in a nativity, 
includes big "benef ic" Jupiter ; the Moon, 
her personality and femininity, and 
mysterious Pluto, said to hold sway over 
the multitudes 

On the reverse side, destiny decreed 
that this daughter pay a dear price for all 
blessings. Five of her planets were m a 
"T Square" at birth, releasing force so 
powerful as to prove at times highly 
destructive. 

Here we find the key to how the very 
masses of people (Pluto) to whom she has 
given so much through the children 
(Venus) of her womb could strike back 
(Mars Neptune) and drive the sword of 
sorrow into her mother's heart (Saturn). 
There is another factor to be con 
sidered. This particular field of planetary 
energy has been known to give a hunger 
for power equally as strong as is shown in 
her husband's chart These parents may 
have told themselves they only wished to 
"serve,'' but the heavens describe an 
overt desire to RULE The desire for 
power often contains within its own seed 
destructive forces. 

The seeds of disaster were in the charts 
of both parents and reflect in the 
nativities of the children. Could astrology 
have helped to prevent some of the 
heartbreakinq events that have pursued 
the Kennedy family? We are constantly 
faced with the question Are you a 
fatalist? In the cases of John and Bobbie, 
both asttoiogers and psychics did try to 
forewarn, but were ignored. 

Ted's dangers were also clearly traced 
in the heavens, indications were 
"classic" examples. After that, very 
psychic, Ted is listening to his small 
voice. 

Can man sidestep his destiny? In my 
opinion many can and should. Some do 
seem born to serve as destinies own 
handmaidens in working out the patterns 
of the world. Bobbie and John both 
seemed to feel themselves compelled 
almost to the point of foolhardiness to 
follow a preordained path Both sensed 
the tragedy that awaited. 



STAR TRENDS: There'll be very little 
compromising with the facts In this 
cycle; you can encounter some clear 
eyed seekers of wisdom and truth. A 
mandate for the "freedom" of the press 
and all communications mediums is 
foremost in the considerations of many. 
STELLAR SUCCESS OUIDE: 

ARIES: (Mar 21 Apr 4) Friends give 
you that extra boost that makes the 
difference between super and just so so 
(April 5 19) If you've been thinking 
"romance" has gone out of your ,ife, look 
around, it's not too late to take tngnt. 

TAURUS: (Apr 20 • May 5) Test all 
ideas and commitments carefully before 
launching, you're mistake prone. (May 6 
20) Gentip finesse eases you past rough 



waters. You can't always have life just 
your own way. 

GEMINI. (May 21 Jun 6) Remember 
all good things take time, don't cancel out 
your impossible dream, keep plugging. 
(Jun 7 21) These stellar rays bring 
valuable insights into personal 
relationships, someone may disappoint 
but another proves to be "sterling. 

CANCER : (Jun 22 Jul 7) Steer a steady 
course and ride the waves of change with 
confidence. (Jul 8 22) Take life easy. Put 
on your shades and seek some of life s 
innocent pleasures. 

LEO: (Jul 23 Aug 7) An excellent year 
for stabilizing your emotional and 
financial life. You will enjoy exceptional 
awareness and keen judgment in all 
affairs Lay the oroundwork for a 
superstructure that will support the years 
ahead (Aug 8 22) A beau'iful time for 



swinging high, wide and handsome with 
someone special. 

VIRGO: (Aug 23 Sept 7) If you can 
avoid becoming restless for the next few 
months, you have it made. Remember, 
all good things take time. (Sept 8-22) 
Don't count on help from friends just now, 
keep your business private and tackle 
problems yourself. . 

LIBRA: (Sept 23 - Oct 7) Work quietly 
on the sidelines but be assured your ef- 
forts are not going unnoticed. (Oct 8 22) 
You've got drive io abundance, as well as 
the needed charm to put over your talent. 
SCORPIO: (Oct 23 Nov 7) Tangling 
with those who have the power to hold you 
back is ill advised. Mark time. (Nov 8-21) 
It will require total dedication to con 
structively employ the powerhouse of 
energy hitting your corner now. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov 22 Dec 7) Relax 
and start enjoying your winnings take a 
holiday. (Dec 8 21) Sidestep the social 



whirl and give total attention to polishing 
worthwhile concepts. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec 22 - Jan 5) Your 
problem could be too big to tackle alone; 
look for expert assistance and mark time. 
(Jan 6 19) Your out of the spotlight for 
awhile, take advantage of the lull to 
reorganize and perfect plans. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan 20 - Feb 3) Seek 
peace and quiet and tune in on your inner 
self for in depth answers. (Feb 4-18) 
You've got extra charm now; don't 
overplay a perfect hand and muff your 
chance to shine. 

PISCES: (Feb 19 - Mar 7) Plan a party 
or a special outing for next week when 
you have an extra quota of what it takes 
to win. (Mar 8-20) Check and double 
check that budget and abide by the hard 
cold facts if you would stay out of the red. 
(Copyright, 1972, by United Feature 
Syndicate, Inc.) 



6 
11 
12 

14 

15 

17 
18 

20 
23 
24 

26 
28 

29 

31 
33 
35 
36 
39 
42 

43 

45 

46 
48 
50 
51 
53 
55 
56 
59 
61 

62 



ACROSS 

Coloring 
substance 
European 
Conductor 
Fruit of the 
dwarf mallow 
Babylonian 
deity 

Periods of 
tinrij 

Lounge about 
Southern 
blackbird 
Lubricator 
Uncle (dial.) 
Ice hockey 
rubber disk 
Kind of beer 
Hypothetical 
' force 
Retail 

establishment 
Saloons 
Catches 
Fop 
Igneous rocks 

King of birds 

For example 

(abbr.) 

King of 

beasts (pi.) 

Metal 

fastener 

Quarrel 

Blemishes 

Conducted 

Woody plant 

Kind of cloth 

Earth goddess 

Hurry 

Destroyer 

Russian 

stockade 

English author 



8 
9 

10 
11 
13 

16 

19 

21 

22 

25 

27 

30 



32 
34 
36 



Sick 

Plumlike 

fruit 

Food fish 

Jumps 

Winter 

vehicles 

Narrow, flat 

board 

Sacred 

images 

Mild 

expletive 

Song anddance 

show 

African 

village 

Part of 

fortification 

Prince of 

apostate 

angels 

Royal 

Cease 

Bed on 

shipboard 



Answer to Yesterday's Puzzle 



nDU EOHHra ORE 

Bf5B QDBITfi niRg 

EBB EI3E311E WEtTl 

HlltX EQBDR „ 

pdeirh gpctiki 

BEE fiEEi^r? nHffi 

mnfr i=beeii HL.D 



37 



Greek market 47 

places 49 

38 Winter 52 

precipitation 54 
Faithful 

subjects 57 

Church official 58 

Retail 60 
establishment 



40 

41 
44 



Direction 
Spirit 

Greek letter 
Girl's 
nickname 
Epistle (abbr.) 
Compass point 
Symbol for 
nickel 



DOWN r 

1 Kind of bean 

2 Cooled lava 

3 Cyprinoid fish 

4 Roman tyrant 

5 Spoor 

6 Spanish (abbr.) 

7 Pronoun 





Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1V72 



T.V. 



Highlights Theatre 



TV HIGHLIGHTS 
Thursday 

8:00 p.m. Jean Shepard's America 
(24) ■ "... A bunch of boys were 
whooping it up at the AAalmute 
Saloon." 

8:00 p.m. Beauty Pageant (40) - The 
Miss Massachusetts World Beauty 
Pageant. Shown from the July 8 
Springfield Contest. There were no 
winners. 

9:00 p.m. Movie: "The Comedians" 
(3, 7, 10) - Excellent 1967 movie about 
Dovalier's Haiti. 
Friday 

7:30 p.m. Baseball (4, 18, 22) - Red 
Sox vs. Yankees 

8:30 p.m. Chronolog (20, 30) - Very 
good special on heroin traffic in 
Southeast Asia. 

8:30p.m. Space Between Words (24) 
Documentary on Segregated 
Schools. 

9:00 p.m. Elizabeth R (3) 
"Horrible Conspiracies" 

9:30 p.m. College All star Football 
(5, 8, 40) 

9:30 p.m. NBC News Special (20, 30) 

Reconstruction of a Murder Spree. 

9:30 p.m. Devout Young (24) - "The 
Jesus People" 

10:00 p.m. Johnny Cash at San 
Quentin (4) - appropriate. 
11:30 p.m. Movie: "Flower Drum 
Song" (10) - Very good musical. 

MOVIES 

Academy — 

"Frenzy" 7:00-9:15 

Calvin — 



"Whafs Up Doc?" 1:30-7:00- 

9:00 

"Whot'i Up Doc?" 7:00-9:00 
Camavs Ciiwnia 1 — 
"The Graduate" 7 4 9 

"Portnoy's Complaint" 7 4 9 

hM»l- 

"Frenzy" 7 4 9 
Jerry lewis Cinema 1 — 

"Fiddler on the Roof" 1:30- 

5:45-9:00 

Jerry Lewis Cinema 2 — 

"Ben" 3:30-9:15 "Lover's 4 
Other Strangers" 1 :45-7: 1 5 

Showcase — 

"Portnoy's Complaint" 2:00- 

7:30-9:40 

Showcase — 

"The Other" 2:00-7:40-9:50 

Showcase — 

"Now You See Him, Now You 
Don't" 2:00-3:50-5:35-7:20 

9:00 

Showcase — 

"Conquest of the Planets of 

the Apes" 2:00-7:30-9:20 
Showcase — 

"The Godfather" 2:00-8:00 
Haaley Orive-ln — 

"Cold Turkey" 8:45 "Hospital" 

10:30 

Rod Rock - 

"Frenzy" 4 "Play Misty For Me" 
Dotrfieid- 

"Dr. Phibes Rises Again" 4 

"Night of the Blood Monster" 
majestic - 

"The Nurses" 4 "Erika's Hot 

Summer" 



SPECIAL EVENTS 
July 27 

Concert, PRESERVATION HALL 
JAZZ BANDOF NEWORLEANSat 8 
p.m., Haigis Mall. If rain, 7 p.m. and 
10 p.m., SU Ballroom. 
July 28 

Tangle wood 

7:00 p.m. Weekend Prelude - to be 
announced. 

9:00 p.m. Eugene Ormandy - 
Brahms: Tragic Overture; Sibelius: 
Symphony No. 5; Bartok: Concerto 
for Orchestra. 
July 29 

Tanglewood „ 

10:30 a.m. Open Rehearsal. 

8:30 p.m. Eugene Ormandy - 
Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3; 
Hindemith: Mathis der Maler; 
Strauss: Ein Heldenleben. 
July 30 

Tanglewood 

2:30p.m. James Levine - Mozart: 
Violin Concerto No. 4; Joseph 
Silverstein - Mahler: Symphony No. 
6. 

THEATER 

"Love, Marriage, etc." by Feiffer, 
South College July 27-August 9. 
Curtain time 8:30. Call 545-2579. 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Beverly - North Shore Music Circus. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Two By Two with 
George Rose and Nancy Andrews. 
Cambridge - Harvard Summer 
School Repertory Theater, Loeb 
Drama Center. Tomorrow, Fri., A 
Heartbreak House. 



Eagleton's Illness Acceptable 



WASHINGTON — Political 
associates and opponents of 
Senator Thomas F. Eagleton ac 
cepted without question the 
Democratic Vice-Presidential 
nominee's explanation of a nervous 
disorder from which he suffered in 
the 1968s. 

Members of Congress and 
Missouri politicans said that Mr. 
Eagleton's history of treatment for 
what the Senator described as 
nervous exhaustion was well 
known in political circles in his 
home state and among some 
associates on Capitol Hill but that 
it had never been used against Mr. 
Eagleton in a campaign. 

The officials, who invariably 
asked that their comments not be 
attributed to them by name, said 
that two stories about Mr. 
Eagleton had been spreading 
across Capitol Hill since Senator 
George McGovern chose the 
Missourian as his Democratic 
running mate. 

The first story was that Mr. 
Eagleton had been hospitalized for 
a nervous condition and the second 
was that he had a drinking 
problem. 

Electroshock therapy, though 
once used for a variety of 
psychiatric ailments, is used today 
mainly in the treatment of selected 
cases of depression, in which the 
success rate is considered good. 

Since the exact nature of Senator 
Thomas F. Eagleton's illness has 
not been disclosed, medical ex- 
perts said that it was impossible to 
say how the treatment had been 
administered to him or how ef- 
fective it was. 

Although psychiatrists vary in 
their opinions of when it is ap- 
propriate to use shock therapy, it is 
generally held that a patient need 
not have been severely debilitated 
by his depression to warrant its 
use. 

Ordinarily, the treatment is 
given in conjunction with 
psychiatric counseling or after 
counseling alone has failed to help 
the patient sufficiently. 

Normally, the procedure is to 
touch electrodes to the temples of 
the patient and administer a pulse 
of moderately strong electricity for 
a fraction of a second. The pulse 
causes the patient to convulse 
momentarily. Ordinarily, the 
patient is anesthetized and given 
muscle relaxant drugs to prevent 
the convulsions from being strong 
enough to break bones. 

Ordinarily, a number of treat- 
ments are given several days 
apart, the frequency and number 
depending on the specific diagnosis 



and the success of previous 
treatments. 

Electroshock therapy, also 
known as electroconvulsive 
therapy, was introduced in 1938 as 
a general treatment for mental 
illness. It was hailed almost as a 
panacea and came to be widely 
used by physicians, many of whom 
were later said to be insufficiently 
trained in its use. 

At one time, nearly every mental 
hospital was giving the treatments 
almost routinely. Then critics 
began publicizing spurious success 
claims. Gradually, the critics 
gained the upper hand in the 
psychiatric profession, and 
electroshock almost disappeared, 
its success unproved for all 
ailments except severe depression. 
No White House Comment 
The White House declined 



comment. "The President has 
made everyone aware that he 
doesn't want any comment on 
personal matters," his deputy 
press secretary, Gerald L. Warren, 
said in response to inquiries. 

Senator Abraham A. Ribicoff of 
Connecticut, who had been among 
those mentioned as potential 
running mates on Mr. McGovern's 
ticket, said that he had "never seen 
anything to warrant a question" 
about Mr. Eagleton's health. 

The Senate Democratic leader, 
Mike Mansfield of Montana, said 
that he would have been routinely 
advised by the Capitol physician if 
any Senator had a serious medical 
problem but that to the best of his 
knowledge Mr. Eagleton had been 
in "excellent physical and mental 
health" during his four years in the 
Senate. 



FTC Stops Another 
School 



The Federal Trade Commission 
has provisionally accepted a 
consent order prohibiting Key 
Learning Systems, Inc., 301 
Broadway, Riviera Beach, Fla., 
from using deceptive means to sell 
correspondence courses and 
collect accounts, and from 
violating the Truth in Lending Act. 

The subsidiaries are Key 
Training Service, Inc. and 
Automobile-Household-Education 
Credit and Finance Corp. Also 
named in the agreed -to order are 
three corporate officials, George 
Lewson, S. Wyman Rolph and 
Theodosia W. LaBarbera. 

The complaint charges that the 
firms have made false claims for 
their correspondence courses 
purporting to train persons for civil 
service examinations and em- 
ployment. Specific allegations are 
that they have misrepresented: 

• They and their salesmen are 
connected with the U.S. Civil 
Service Commission or some other 
agency or branch of the U.S. 
Government. 

• They are selecting and 
training persons for specific civil 
service positions, and their 
salesmen are qualified to deter- 
mine prospects' qualifications for 
such positions. 

•They have specialized in- 
formation on the availability of 
civil service positions in various 
areas. 

•Purchasers are provided with 
specific courses for all civil service 
positions 



• Completion of the courses 
makes persons eligible for ap- 
pointment to, or assures them of, 
or guarantees civil service 
positions. 

• Enrollment contracts of 
purchasers who make an initial 
downpayment will not become 
binding until the total down- 
payment required has been 
received by the firm. 

The complaint also alleges the 
firms' debt collection materials 
misrepresent that delinquent 
accounts have been assigned to an 
independent collection agency and 
that if payment is not made im- 
mediate legal action will be in- 
stituted, the debtor's credit rating 
will be adversely affected, and a 
judgment will be taken without any 
opportunity for him to assert any 
defenses. 

A further allegation is that the 
concerns, in their enrollment 
contracts, do not make cost and 
computation disclosures required 
by the Truth in Lending Act when a 
penalty is assessed for late 
payment. 

The agreement is for settlement 
purposes only and does not con- 
stitute an admission by the 
respondents that they have 
violated the law. When issued by 
the Commission on a final basis, a 
consent order carriers the force of 
law with respect to future actions. 
A violation of such an order may 
result in a civil penalty up to $5,000 
per violation being imposed upon a 
respondent. 



Moon for the Misbegotten; Wed., 
Sat., The Matchmaker; Thurs., 
Harvard Yard Players. Wed., Fri., 
Winnie the Pooh (a rock musical) ; 
Fri., Sat., The Star-Spangled Girl. 
The Proposition. Wed. -Sat., an 
improvised revue with music. 
Chatham - Monomoy Theater,. Wed.- 
Sat., Come Blow Your Horn. 
Cohasset - South Shore Music Circus. 
Today, Preservation Hall Jazz Band; 
tomorrow-Sat., Sergio Franchi and 
Norm Crosby. 

Dennis - Cape Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Mourning in a Funny Hat (new 
by Dody Goodman) with Shirley 
Booth. 

Easthampton - Williston Summer 
Thealer. Wed. at 10:30 a.m.; Fri., 
Sat. at 2 p.m.; The Emperor's New 
Clothss; Wed., Thurs. at 7:30 p.m., 
Fri., Sat. at 8 p.m., Rhinoceros. 
Falmouth - Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Conflict of Interest with Barry 
Nelson. 

Highfield Theater. Tues.-Sat., The 
New Moon. 

Fitchbung - High Tor Summer 
Theater. Tues.-Sat., Not By Bed 
Alone. 

Framingham - Chateau de Ville 
Dinner Theater. Today, My Fair 
Lady with Noel Harrison; Tues.-Sat., 
Carousel with John Raitt. 
Greenfield - Arena Civic Theater. 
Thurs.-Sat., Happy Birthday, Wanda 
June. 

Hyannis - Cape Cod Melody Tent. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Mitzi Gaynor. 
Lenox - Arts Center. Today, Wed., 
Sat., Andre Gregory's Company 
presents Beckett's Endgame in open 
rehearsals. The Poetry Series: 
Today at 5:30 in the Apple Orchard, 
Robert Creeley and Honor Moore. 
Medford - Tufts Summer Theater. 
Wed. -Sat., We Have Always Lived in 
the Castle. 

North Eastham - The Fisherman's 
Players. Today, Evolution of a 
Sister; tomorrow, Tues., The Savior 
and The Resurrection of J. Thadeus 
Sloan by Richard D. Waters; Wed., 
Sarah and the Sax, and Spreading the 
News; Thurs., Sarah and the Sax and 
The Clown; Fri., Sat., Color Me 
Human by Richard D. Waters. 



Orleans - Arena Theater. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Celebration. 

Plymouth - Priscilla Beach Theater. 
The Sensuous Woman. 
Provincetown Playhouse on 

theWharf. Today-Sat., A Long Day's 
Journey Into Night. 
Saugus - Chateau de Ville Dinner 
Theater. Today, Tues., -Sat., The 
Sound of Music. 

South Hadley - Mount Holyoke 
College Summer Theater. Tues.-Sat., 
See How They Run. 
South Yarmouth Playhouse. 

Tomorrow-Sat., Any Wednesday. 
Stockbridge - Berkshire Theater 
Festival. Today at 5 p.m., Tues.-Fri. 
at 8:30 a.m., Sat. at 5 and 9 p.m., The 
Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in- 
fhe-Moon Marigolds with June 
Havoc. 

Sturbridge - Ring-A-Round 
Playhouse. Today, Twelfth Night; 
Tues.-Sat., The Fourposter. 
West Harwich - Junior Theater. 
Tues. -Thurs., Comedy of Errors. 
West Springfield - Storrowton 
Musical Theater. Tomorrow-Sat., 
Fiddler on the Roof. 
Williamstown - Theater. Wed. -Sat., 
Once in a Lifetime with Ken Howard. 
Worcester - Foothills Theater 
Company, Atwood Hall at Clark 
University. Tues.-Sat., A Shot in the 
Dark. 

CONNECTICUT 

East Haddam • Goodspeed Opera 
House. Tomorrow-Sat., Sunny with 
Leland Palmer. 

Farmington - Triangle Playhouse. 
Thurs.-Sat., The Gazebo. 
Ivoryton - Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., 1776. 

New Fairfield - Candlewood Theater. 
Tomorrow-Sat., See How They Run 
with Mickey Rooney. 
Sharon • Playhouse. Tues.-Sat., Dark 
of the Moon. 

Southbury - Playhouse. Tues.-Sat., 
Night Must Fall. 

Storrs - Nutmeg Summer Playhouse. 
Tues.-Sat., Plaza Suite. 
Stratford - The American 
Shakespeare Festival Theater. 
Today, Thurs., mats., Tues., Sat. 
eves., Major Barbara; Wed. mat., 
Fri. eve., Julius Caesar; Sat. mat., 



All From A 
Box of Cereal 



Four manufacturers of ready-to- 
eat (RTE) cereals have denied 
Federal Trade Commission 
charges of illegally monopolizing 
the industry. 

The firms answering the com- 
plaint issued April 26, 1972, are: 
Kellogg Co., 235 Porter St., Battle 
Creek, Mich.; General Mills, Inc., 
9200 Wayzata Blvd., Minneapolis, 
Minn.; General Foods Corp., 250 
North St., White Plains, N.Y.; The 
Quaker Oats Co., Merchandise 
Mart Plaza, Chicago, 111. 

The following are among con- 
tentions advance in the answers : 

General Mills-'Competition in 
the breakfast food industry among 
cereal products and other break- 
fast food items has been vigorous, 
effective and substantial. It has not 
been lessened or impaired by any 
restrictive acts or practices or 
barriers to entry. The number of 
manufacturers has increased 
rather than decreased in recent 
years, and the American public 
has continued without interruption 
to enjoy the benefits of free and 
open competition. Current industry 
organization is the result of freely 
operating competitive forces. It is 
not the result or the cause of any 
artificial restraints on competition 
or barriers to entry." 

General Foods "General Foods 
has throughout the period covered 
by the complaint actively com- 
peted with the other respondents 
and otner competitors, thereby 
obtaining a position in the market 
where its products are well and 
favorably known, and are pur- 
chased by the consuming public. 
The compalint's charge that 
General Foods measure of success 
in the lawful pursuit of its business. 



in light of the fact that other 
companies have had equal or 
greater success, makes all of them 
in the aggregate violators of the 
Federal Trade Commission Act, is 
impermissible under the 
established principle of law 
favoring a free competitive 
economy, and violates the 
provisions of the United States 
Constitution guaranteeing its 
citizens due process of law and 
protection against ex post facto 
laws." 

Quaker Oats Company-"Each 
respondent is in substantial 
competition with each and all of 
the other respondents and with 
other cereal producers in the 
manufacture and sale of RTE 
cereals in interstate commerce, 
and avers that Quaker's RTE 
cereals are also in substantial 
competition with other food 
products, but denies that com- 
petition between each respondent 
and others has been hindered, 
lessened and eliminated as alleged 
in the complaint or in any other 
manner." 



No Gator-Aid 

Overriding Federal pleas, the 
Louisiana Wild Life and Fisheries 
Commission voted a 13-day ex- 
perimental hunting season on 
alligators, a species long con- 
sidered endangered. Wild Life 
Director Clark Hoffpauer, said the 
season will help keep nature's 
proper balance. They're neck deep 
in 'gators in Cameron Parish and if 
the 'gators keep destroying the 
landowners' furbearing animals, 
the landowners are going to kill 
them anyway. 




August 1, 1972 



University of Massachusetts ^^ ^ 



"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



10 



Pats Get Windsor, Punter 



By ED BRYANT 

New England Patriots' General 
Manager Upton Bell accomplished 
both of his major trading ob- 
jectives yesterday in separate 
deals with San Francisco and 
Detroit. Bell obtained tight end 
Bob Windsor, a six-year veteran, 
and John Benien (BEE -nine), a 
rookie punter from Oklahoma 
State. 

Windsor, a starter for the 49'ers 
until last season, was obtained for 
the Patriots' first choice in the 1974 
draft. Bell is extremely pleased 
with the deal, which gives him 
Windsor's services immediately, 
and more than a year in which to 
re-obtain a first round pick for 
1974. Bell said, "with 49 catches in 
1969 and 31 the following year, 
Windsor has already shown that he 
can catch the ball in this league." 



By obtaining Windsor, the 
Patriots have given themselves a 
proven tight end, who can not only 
block, but can also catch the long 
pass. Although he didn't play much 
last season, Windsor caught a pass 
for a crucial touchdown in the 
49'ers playoff victory over 
Washington. His 49 catches in 1969 
ranked him among the top 
receivers in pro football that year. 

Benien, a first round pick in the 
supplemental draft, was pur- 
chased from Detroit for an un- 
disclosed 1973 draft pick. He 
ranked second in the NCAA in 
punting his junior year, first his 
senior year. For his final two years 
as a collegian, he averaged 45.5 per 
kick, which figure would place him 
among the cream of NFL punters. 
Equally important, Benien has an 
exceptional ability to kick the ball 



so that it remains in the air for a 
long time. As a junior his punts 
stayed up for an unbelievable five 
seconds, although he slipped to 4.3 
as a senior. For the Patriots, who 
were terrible last season in 
defending against punt returns, he 
is truly a gift from a benign god. 




Leo Kottke 



Eagleton Withdraws 



After seven days of weighing 
public opinion. Senator Thomas 
Eagleton formally withdrew as the 
Democratic Vice-Presidential 
candidate last night. The decision 
was announced by Senajtor George 
McGovern after a two-hour 
meeting with Eagleton in 
Washington. McGovern stated that 
the decision for Eagleton to with- 
draw was made jointly. The main 
reason given was that Eagleton's 
health problems would divide the 
country and take attention away 
from the main issues of the 
campaign. McGovern stated that 
he personally felt that Eagleton 
was in excellent health. 

Speculation is running high that 
Lawrence O'Brian will be selected 
to replace Eagleton on the ticket. A 
major announcement is expected 
to this effect from McGovern at 9 
a.m. today. 

Eagleton's disclosure last 
Tuesday that he had been 
hospitalized in 1960, 1964 and 1966 
for nervous exhaustion and fatigue 



kicked off the week of 1ffttrtia» i . 
over the Missouri senator's 
suitability to serve as vice 
president. He said at a news 
conference in South Dakota he had 
been under the care of a 
psychiatrist and underwent 
electric shock treatment in 1960 
and 1966 for depression. 

The disclosure stirred public 
controversy about voters' 
willingness to accept Eagleton's 
assessment that he has totally 
overcome his medical problems. 
'I've learned to pace myself now," 
he said. 

Another issue raised in public 
debate was Eagleton's failure to 
inform McGovern of his medical 
history before the South Dakota 
senator asked him to be his run- 
ning mate at the Democratic 
National Convention July 13. 

On Sunday, Mrs. Jean West- 
wood, chairman of the Democratic 
National Committee, called for the 
vice presidential candidate 
voluntarily to withdraw from the 
running. 



Five players were placed on 
waivers yesterday, all rookies. Cut 
were John McMillen from San Jose 
State, and Scott Lougheed from 
Purdue, both punters; offensive 
tackle Bruce Mitchell from 
Kansas; linebacker Joel Klimek 
from Pittsburgh; and Doug 
Campbell, a running back from 
Ithaca. 



The cuts left two punters in 
camp, Joe Spicko and Mitch 
Robertson. With the trade for 
Benien later in the day, their 
chances of sticking with this club 
were considerably decreased. 

Early in the afternoon, Bell said 
that the acquisition of a tight end 
and a punter "would make this 
club damn competitive." Those 
acquisitions have been made. 



In other developments, the 
Patriots began work on their 
special teams, and Bob Gladieux 
has begun to work at fullback. 
Gladieux, who is well-known for 
having the kind of attitude coaches 
love, is being given a shot at a 
starting berth, the vacancy caused 
by the departure of Jim Nance. 



The special teams, a frequently 
overlooked aspect of the game, are 
crucial. No team can be a winner if 
their opponents always get the ball 
in advantageous field position. 
This was the Pats' worst flaw a 
year ago, one that must be 
corrected if they are to win con- 
sistently. 



Kottke Tonite 

The UMass Summer Program '72 will present a folk concert tonight at 
6:30 p.m. on Metawampe Lawn between the Student Union and Campus 
Center. 

Featured in the Concert is guitar wizard Leo Kottke and Bill Staines 
and Mike Cataldo as opening performances. 

Kottke has a tremendous range, from J.S. Bach solo to sounds similar 
to the Jefferson Airplanes' "Embryonic Journey". He plays both the 6- 
and 12-string acoustic guitars. Kottke is a protege of John Fahey who has 
produced one of his albums. 

Staines and Cataldo are Massachusetts men. Staines has appeared at 
UMass in recent summers. Cataldo will make use of piano and an ac- 
companying bassist. 

Staines, has been traveling throughout the United States, playing in 
coffee houses, quiet clubs and festivals in Texas, Virginia, Pennsylvania 
and Canada. In Massachusetts, the Boston Phoenix has called him 
"simply the city's best performer". 

In case of rain, the event will be held in the Student Union Ballroom. 

More information on these and other summer events at the University 
is available by contacting the Student Activities Office in the Campus 
Center at 545-2351. 

Republicans Favor 

Nixon for Re-election 



CAMBRIDGE. Mass. — A 
national survey by a progressive 
Republican organization says 
President Nixon is favored for re- 
election in 35 states, but notes he 
"has always run well in the 
summer and done considerable 
worse in November." 

The survey was conducted by the 
Ripon Society which is based in 
Cambridge. The report also in- 
dicates the Republicans have a 
chance of winning a majority of the 
Senate seats, but not much hope for 
change in the House. 

The group expects the GOP to 
pick up seats in New Mexico, 
Rhode Island, Oklahoma and 
North Carolina. The party may 
capture some in Georgia and 
Alabama. 

The Republicans would 
still be on the short side of the stick 
252-183. 



But. the report says the party 
can expect to lose in Idaho, Maine 
and South Dakota. The gain of 
three senators would give the 
Democrats a 52-48 edge. 

The survey indicates the 
Republicans can also expect to 
gain three more seats in the 
Senate. 



The report said the Presidents 
chances in the November election 
are subject to the Charisma of the 
McGovern Crusade into the 
Promised Land, anticipated 
Democratic voter-registration 
drive, the progress of the war and 
the economy, voter reaction to the 
President's stand on school busing 
and the proven ability of Nixon 
campaign organizations to reduce 
commanding leads." 



Fine Arts Center to Open in Fall of 73 



By BRUCE J. DORA 

Barring strikes and labor 
disputes, Freshman entering the 
University in Fall of 1973 will be 
the first class to have four years 
use of the new Fine Arts Center, 
according to Edmund Ryan, chief 
projects engineer. 

The seemingly shapeless con- 
crete and steel monstrosity at the 
south end of the Campus Pond is 
what will become a 206,000 square 
foot Fine Arts Center, Ryan said. 
This building, designed in 1963, will 
cost the Commonwealth $14,550,000 
and the Federal government an 
additional $750,000. 

The center will actually be seven 
buildings contained in one- 
including rehearsal halls, recital 
halls, concert hall, studio theatre, 
art gallery, theatre and a lobby 
meeting area. Ryan commented. 

Other construction projects in 
store for future students are Phase 
II of the Graduate Research Center 
which is the building of physic and 
math tower, an addition to the 



Health Service building and 60,000 
square feet of modular classroom 
buildings, said Jack Littlefield, 
Director of Planning. The modular 
buildings will be divided among 
three locations-Chancellor's Hill, 
La Crosse Field near Boyden, and 
the School of Education, he said. 

The "Big Ditch" near Hamlin 
House is not Mr. Nixon's latest at 
expanding cultural relations to 
China as rumor may have it-but 
steam lines from the new power 
plant at Tillson Farm, said Ryan. 
This is not an electric power plant 
but a heating plant to replace the 
present one in the heart of the 
campus. 

This phase of construction from 
East Pleasant St. to North 
Pleasant St. should be completed 
by Labor Day and will bury a 20- 
inch steam supply line and a 10- 
inch condensation return line, 
"The May, June and July water 
(rain) has set us behind. But, we 
are still shooting for Labor Day," 
he said. 




Fine Arts Center encroaches upon pond. (Photo by Steve Schmidt) 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier ______^^ 

The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in the Campus 
Center, Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for 
the contents. No copy is censored by the administration before 
Publication. Represented for national advertising by National 
Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1972 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1t72 



University of Massachusetts — The Crier • Page Three 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



James E. Gold 
Jack Koch 
Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 
Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

PERFORMING ARTS EDITOR Elleni Koch 

PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 

OCCASIONAL EDITORIAL CARTOONIST 



Shelly Karp 



The Threshold of a relationship. 



Media Problems 

Close Scrutiny Can Destroy 



Campus Carousel 

Becoming The Best 

Bv TONY GRANITE 

THE BEST OF ALL ACADEMIC 
WORLDS has been promised by 
the new prexy of the Louisiana 
State University System, ac- 
cording to a page one report in the 
LSU Slimmer Reveille. 

"I intend that LSU shall become 
a model of financial efficiency and 
educational effectiveness," Dr. 
Martin D. Woodin says. "The 
undergraduate curricula should be 
more career-oriented -md an effort 



made to accommodate those 
students who choose to pursue 
education in non-traditional 
ways." 
Promises. Promises. 

HEADLINE OF THE WEEK 

appeared in the same issue of the 
LSU Summer Reveille: "Professor 
Given Grant for Earthworm 
Study." 

Which promises the beginning of 
;i new era in Academe. 



LOS ANGELES — Senator 
Thomas F. Eagleton faced a news 
conference here last week and 
said: "Quite frankly, I did not 
think the experience I have had in 
these instances (of depression) 
was of that great moment. I now 
realize it is. I've read the headlines 
in the morning papers. . ." 

In recent months George 
McGovern, too, has had to read the 
headlines in the morning papers — 
sometimes to his grief. Suddenly, 
every word he says, every gesture 
he makes, every incident in his 
past has become subject to the 
closest kind of journalistic 
scrutiny. 

The process is hardly a new 
phenomenon. It overtakes every 
politician emerging from the 
shadows of obscurity into the stark 
glare of national prominence. It 
brings the candidate into focus and 
allows the voters to examine the 
details of his personality and 
program. 

But the massive, unrelenting 
scrutiny of the media can also 
magnify and even distort those 
details. Most newsmen, par- 
ticularly those of the electronic 
media, are under substantial 



home-office pressure to produce 
dramatic copy. When news is slow, 
they grab for what is available. 
From a single word, even the in- 
flection of a voice, they can and do 
manufacture the major stories of 

the day. 

Consider the Tuesday press 
conference at Senator McGovern's 
vacation retreat in South Dakota. 
For days, hundreds of journalists 
had been encamped there, 
feverishly seeking fresh copy — 
coming up with little more exciting 
than the name of the horse the 
Senator had been riding. 
Moreover, it was the middle of a 
sweltering, mid-summer week, 
and the rest of the world's 
newsmakers seemed to have 
retreated to their porches with 
pitchers of martinis. 

When Senator Eagleton 
disclosed that he had been 
hospitalized three times for 
treatment of depression, he 
touched off a shock wave of 
bulletins, broadcasts and broad- 
sides. All of the engines of the 
media, idling in a slow-news 
summer slump, were suddenly 
revved up. And they stayed that 
way day after day, banner 
headline after banner headline, al 



Art Buchwald 



Gaining Democrats For McGovern 



In a direct challenge to the 
"Democrats for Nixon," a new 
political organization has been 
incorporated in Washington this 
week with the unlikely name of 
"Democrats for McGovern." 

The chairman, Partridge 
Wankleman, opened the storefront 
headquarters last Thursday on 
Pennsylvania Avenue, just three 
blocks from the White House. We 
went to a cocktail party 
celebrating the festivities ar.d had 
a few moments with Wankleman. 

"This is a grassroots 
movement," he explained. "There 
are many Democrats who are fed 
up with Nixon, and we want to 
welcome them into our party." 

"That's a good idea," I said, 
"but according to the polls, there 
aren't too many Democrats who 
have indicated they would vote for 
McGovern." 

"The polls could be wrong," 
Wankleman said. "There are some 
Democrats who want to vote for 
McGovern, but at this stage 
they're not willing to speak up. We 
hope, that by starting this 
organization, we can make it 
possible for them to work for our 
candidate. We're not asking them 



to stop being Democrats. 

"All we're asking is that they 
search their consciences and vote 
for the best man, even if the best 
man is George McGovern." 

"That's pretty hard for a 
Democrat to do," I said. 

"We're optimistic. As a matter 
of fact, we've already signed up 
three Democratic senators and 
four Democratic governors, and 
that's only the beginning. Our 
people are now working on 
Democratic congressmen. I 
wouldn't be surprised if at least 
half of them didn't come out for the 
McGovern ticket." 

"That's a good start," I ad- 
mitted. "I suppose you won't go 
after people like Mayor Daley or 
George Meany." 

"We will, eventually. But at the 
moment, we'd rather attract 
Democrats who are on the fence 
and could go one way or another. 
We want those who will work for 
McGovern even if it's against their 
philosophy." 

Wankleman said the 

"Democrats for McGovern" were 
printing buttons, bumper stickers 
and posters. They were also 
seeking testimonials from well 




people associated with the 
!ratic Party in the past. 

Bney seemed to be the big hitch. 

"We can find Democrats for 
McGovern, but we can't seem to 
find many who will support him 
financially." 

"How do you find them?" I 
asked. 

"We're working from 
Democratic Party lists. We send 
out mailing to the Democrats, 
asking if they would be interested 
in supporting our candidate. It's 
amazing how many we've heard 
from Last week, out of 1 million 



letters we received 1678 af- 
firmative replies." 

"That should give the 
Republicans something to think 
about," I said. 

"I believe one of the reasons for 
the success of the organization," 
Wankleman said "is we promise 
them that even if they support 
McGovern, they can still vote the 
straight Democratic ticket for 
other races. This has reassured 
many Democrats who might 
otherwise think they were turn- 
coats." 

"Where did you get your idea for 
the "Democrats for McGovern"? 

"Strangely enough, from the 
Republicans. When they started 
Democrats for Nixon, it occurred 
to us that some Democrats 
deserved another choice. So we 
organized the Democrats for 
McGovern, to give them a place to 
go. 

"Will you have storefronts like 
this all over America?" I asked. 

"We hope to. This is the race to 
the finish, and if we can prove that 
even Democrats will vote for 
McGdvern, then perhaps the in- 
dependents might go along with 
us." 



through the week. Senator 
McGovern's staff had obviously 
failed to anticipate the reaction. 
Said one on Thursday: "We 
thought it would blow over in a 
couple of days." 

When he started campaigning in 
New Hampshire last winter, 
Senator McGovern had con- 
siderably different problems. The 
entire press corps covering his 
campaign rode comfortably in a 
compact car, with some room left 
over. 

One day, Senator Edmund S. 
Muskie put forth an economic 
program that landed on Page 1. 
The same day, Senator McGovern 
announced a similar program; it 
received three short paragraphs. 

But "front-runner" Muskie 
faltered in the face of constant 
press exposure. He came to be 
haunted by two rather minor but 
much-publicized slips: His 
statement in Los Angeles that he 
would not accept a black running 
mate and his public weeping in 
New Hampshire after the local 
press had published an article 
critical of his wife. 

George Romney had a similar 
experience in 1968. While cam- 
paigning for the Republican 
Presidential nomination, he said 
he had been "brainwashed" by the 
military in Vietnam, and that one 
word, flashed on front pages and 
television sets around the country, 
triggered his collapse. 

After New Hampshire, Senator 
McGovern enjoyed a honeymoon 
with the press. He came across as 
a man whose positions were clear- 
cut and unambiguous. By 
California, however, the press was 
looking at him with a harder eye. 
His welfare proposals, for instance 
had been ignored for months. But 
when he had to explain them on a 
nationally televised debate the 
Senator was forced to acknowledge 
he did not know exactly how much 
they would cost. 

It got worse after the primary. 
When Senator McGovern said he 
would "beg" Hanoi to release 
American prisoners, the word 
achieved instant notoriety. When 
he exploded with anger after he 
lost the challenge to his California 
delegates in the credentials 
committee, everybody knew about 
it. When he told a meeting of 
P.O.W. wives that he might have 
troops in Thailand, he ignited 
another balst of publicity. And thus 
he learned —as Senator Eagleton 
learned last week— the perils of 
being "big news." 

—STEVEN V. ROBERTS 
(Reprinted from the New York 
Times) 



Depression: Common, Insidious, Mysterious 



Depression. It is one of the most common, 
most insidious of all human ills— and like so 
many forms of mental illness, one of the 
least understood. Last week Senator 
Thomas F. Eagleton, for his own special 
reasons, indicated that he would seek to 
"educate" the public about depression. 
Policital considerations aside, the need for 
such instruction is widely recognized in the 
medical fraternity. 

As Senator Eagleton's dramatic 
revelations made clear, depression can 
strike not only the aged or lonely, but those 
of us who apparently have the most to live 
for. A smiling, active appearance may 
conceal a soul tortured by doubt and feelings 
of un worthiness. 

We have all had some personal experience 
with depression for it is basically an inap- 
propriate prolongation or appearance of 
plain grief. But grief, unlike depression, is 
related to a clearly identifiable event in a 
person's life— the illness of a child; the 
death of a friend or loved one — and 
gradually fades with time. 

Depression often has no such dramatic 
onset or cause. It may reveal itself 
gradually. Or it may follow the completion 
of an arduous task ( a political campaign, for 
example) or a long-sought goal. Its physical 
symptoms: a poor appetite, a sleeping 
problem, digestive troubles, fatigue, loss of 
sexual interest. The victim's basic 
judgment may not be impaired, but the 
apathy and lack of energy may lessen his 
ability to function normally. Such diverse 
physical symptoms explain why general 
practitioners, internists and gynecologists 



prooably examine and treat as many 
depressed patients as all the psychiatrists in 
the nation. In a recent series of patients with 
long-standing headache, for example, Dr. 
Seymour Diamond of Chicago found over 90 
per cent to be suffering from depression. 
Other studies of chest symptoms in college 
students, chronic gynecologic complaints in 
women with normal physical and laboratory 
tests, and similar illnesses have shown a 
high incidence of underlying depression. 

Once diagnosed, depression is treated in a 
variety of ways, depending on the severity 
of the illness, the age and background of the 
patient and the personal experiences of the 
treating physician. Psychotherapy is in- 
dicated in most cases, but patients often 
resist the idea of seeing a psychiatrist and 
those who go are not always helped. 

Two other kinds of treatment have been 
developed, both of which are often used in 
conjunction with psychotherapy: 

Anti-depressant pills. There are two 
major classes. Both apparently work by 
altering the brain metabolism, possibly 
allowing the body to accumulate more 
adrenalin-related compounds and thereby 
raising the patient's energy quotient. Unlike 
amphetamine compounds, they do not 
produce a "high" or increased energy in 
persons who are not depressed. However, 
they may be accompanied by bothersome 
side effects, and there is a lag of anywhere 
between three days and three weeks before 
they become effective, 
following observations that mentally 

Shock treatments. Electroconvulsive 
therapy (ECT) was developed following the 



observation that mentally ill patients who 
also had epilepsy showed improvement 
after an epileptic seizure. 

Today ECT is limited primarily to the 
treatment of depression. No one yet has the 
least understanding of how it works, but the 
improvement in depressed patients after a 
series of ECT is often dramatic. Unlike drug 
therapy, ECT has little lag period and 
benefit may be apparent after the first day's 
treatment. Because there is an initial 
feeling of amnesia immediately after each 
treatment, some patients are afraid of ECT. 
Some psychiatrists feel that a large number 
of shocks can produce permanent memory 
gaps, though this is seldom seen in the 
patient who has one or two series of treat- 
ments. 

It is fair to say that most physicians and 
psychiatrists today look upon ECT as a last- 
ditch method of treatment, one to be em- 
ployed after drugs and psychotheraphy 
have failed. However, many psychiatrists, 
particularly older ones who trained just as 
ECT was coming into general use, feel that 
it has been unjustly stigmatized, that its 
results are dramatic and its side-effects 
minimal. 

Special circumstances also dictate a 
preference for one form of treatment or 
another. The Mayo Clinic, where Senator 
Eagleton was treated, does not draw its 
patients from permanent residents of 
Rochester, Minn. In psychiatry, medicine 
and surgery, it not only attracts patients 
with rare and difficult diseases, but others 
with more mundane problems who for one 
reason or another do not wish to be treated 



in their home towns, but want to return 
there as soon as possible. Long-term 
psychoanalysis is impossible and the 
regulation of drug therapy difficult under 
such conditions. 

Senator Eagleton's expressed interest in 
"educating" the public about depression 
reflects a widespread feeling that, though 
Americans have become more sophisticated 
in recent years about mental illness, some 
stigma remains. 

When one-time publisher Ralph Ginzburg 
attempted in 1964 to characterize Barry 
Goldwater as psychiatrically unfit for the 
Presidency, Mr. Ginzburg lost $75,000 in a 
libel judgment for his efforts. Rumors of 
Richard Nixon's supposed psychiatric care 
were nurtured by Democrats in 1968. 

And political uses of psychiatry aside, 
many American still have a deep-seated 
fear of mental illness. In some circles, the 
campaign to understand mental illness is 
seen, like fluoridation, as some kind of 
Communist plot. 

Attempts to educate the public about 
mental illness are praiseworthy, but they 
have been known to be counter-productive. 
In a classic Canadian study, an intensive 
attempt to educate a medium-sized town 
about mental illness produced more 
negative attitudes at the end of the year than 
had existed before the study began. 

-DR. MICHAEL HALBERSTAM 
Dr. Halberstam is a practicing cardiologist 
in Washington, D. C, and the at l .hor of the 
recently published "The Pills in Your Life." 
(Reprinted from the New York Times) 



Patriots Polish Offensive 



By ED BRYANT 

Improved offensive polish, 
together with a shining per- 
formance by first draft pick Tom 
Reynolds, is the big story of the 
New England Patriots' second 
intrasquad scrimmage game, 
played Saturday at Alumni 
Stadium. The offense gained a total 
of 288 yards in 59 plays, scoring 
four touchdowns. 

Reynolds, a rookie from San 
Diego State College, an incubator 
for professional football, caught 
four passes for 76 yards and a 
touchdown, leading the receivers. 
He made one truly amazing catch 
for a touchdown, twisting in the air 
to take Brian Dowling's pass from 
20 yards out. Randy Vataha, whose 
job as the other starting wide 



receiver is secure, caught three 
passes for 32 yards. Vataha did not 
score a touchdown, dropping a low 
Jim Plunkett toss is his only 
scoring attempt. Reggie Rucker 
and Hubie Bryant, the other 
leading candidates at the wide 
receiver spot, each caught two 
passes, Rucker taking one for a 
touchdown, an eight-yard effort 
from Jim Plunkett. Plunkett had a 
nearly perfect day, completing 
eight of eleven passes for 84 yards. 
The other contenders at quar- 
terback each had a fairly good day. 
Steve Goepel, a rookie from 
Colgate, who started the last 
scrimmage by failing to complete 
his first twelve passes, was 3 for 6, 
with one touchdown and one in- 
terception. Brian Dowling, trying 



for the fourth time to make the 
NFL, began well, completing 6 of 
his first 7 passes for 93 yards. His 
last five tosses were incomplete, 
marring his day's statistics. 

Dowling, an outstanding 
collegiate player at Yale, where he 
never played in a losing game, has 
the football intelligence necessary 
to an NFL quarterback. His 
problem has been his arm, which is 
erratic, not of the kind the gods 
would choose when cloning 
quarterbacks. Playing quar- 
terback is not merely throwing a 
football, however, and Brian 
Dowling has a strong chance to 
make this Patriots' team. 

Coach John Mazur in his post- 
scrimmage press conference 
Draised several players. Rick 



Cash, obtained from Los Angeles in 
the Fred Dryer maneuvering, 
played a good game at defensive 
tackle. Also praised were 
linebacker Jim Flanigan, cor- 
nerback Honor Jackson, and 
running backs Carl Garrett, Bob 
Gladieux, and Jack Maitland. 

This year's Patriots will 
probably feature more passing. 
The departure of Jim Nance is in 
no small way attributable to the 
development of Jim Plunkett as an 
outstanding quarterback. A year 
ago Plunkett arrived late in camp, 
having played in the College All- 
Star Game. The wide receiver 
corps consisted largely of players 
who have since been released, with 
names like Bake Turner, Eric 
Stolberg. Bavle Knief, and Bill 



Rademacher. The improved talent 
at this crucial position made it 
possible to alter the thrust of the 
offense, making Nance, a big 
fullback who once carried the ball 
25 times a game, expendable. If 
General Manager Upton Bell can 
find a tight end with enough speed 
to go deep, this team should score a 
lot of points in 1972. 

The defense, a part of the game 
as critical as the offense, did not 
look as good Saturday. Obviously 
any yardage gained by the offense 
are gained against the defense. 
The defense did not do as good a 
job this week at stopping the of- 
fense. The test of the defense will 
come this weekend, when they face 
the Oakland Raiders, a perennial 
power in the league. 



Godfather - Part II "BeingEarnest"atGreenfield 

- .. m i ^-, i K*icJiir*»c hovo rir\t Kaon rlicnlncorl ^^^^ 



HOLLYWOOD — "The God 
fatner" will ride again-to many 
more millions at the world's film 
box offices. 

Paramount Pictures announced 
the other day that "The Godfather, 
Part II, will be filmed early next 
year with Al Pacino as star and 
Francis Ford Coppola as producer 
and director. The premiere date 
already is set: March 27, 1973. 

A sequel to the Mafia saga ap- 
peared inevitable. "The God- 
father" has proved a phenomenon 
of movie history, increasing the 
fortunes of Paramount and its 
parent company, Gulf and 
Western. 

"Charles Bludhorn, head of Gulf 
and Western, has said that 'The 
Godfather' will earn between $125 
million in rentals," said Robert 
Evans, Paramount production 
chief. 

" 'Gone With the Wind' now holds 
the record with $114 million, 
followed by The Sound of Music' 
with $112 million. But 'Gone With 
the Wind' took 30 years to make 
that much, and Sound of Music' 
seven years. The Godfather' will 
break their records in one years." 
Evans reported that "The 
Godfather" had drawn $101 million 
in theater grosses during its first 18 
weeks in release. 

When "The Godfather'"s hit 
status seemed apparent, the 
Paramount production minds 
began thinking about a sequel. 
Mario Puzo, author of the original 
novel, was commissioned to write 
a continuation of the history of the 
Corleone family, fictional leaders 
of a faction of the Mafia. 



Figures have not been disclosed, 
but Puzo earned far more than his 
returns from the film sale of "The 
Godfather". 

"Mario got about $75,000 for the 
book," Evans recalled, "plus a 
small percentage of the profits. At 
the beginning, we had a one-year 
option on the book for $i 0,000; we 
bought it before it was written. 

"After the book was finished, we 
were offered a million dollars for 
our option. That was one profit 
we're glad we didn't make." 

"The Godfather, Part II" will 
carry the Corleone fortunes from 
the end of the first film, 1956, until 
1972. 

"The new film will have the 
same look, the same integrity of 
the original," Evans said. "It will 
not be an exploitation picture. 
Coppola believes the new story will 
be even better than the first one." 

Evans happily looked forward to 
teaming the two films after each 
had played singly-'that should 
carry Paramount through the 
1970s." 

And what then-'Grandson of 
Godfather"? 



GREENFIELD, Mass. — "The 
Importance of Being Earnest", a 
trivial comedy for serious people 
by Oscar Wilde, opens Thursday at 
Arena Civic Theatre at the 
Roundhouse, Franklin County 
Fairgrounds in Greenfield. 

Probably the most famous of all 
the modern artificial comedies, the 
play revolves gayly and wittily 
around a "manufactured" 
mistaken identity. The ACT 
production is directed by William 
Christern, who has played the 
leading role of John Worthing 
many times both in stock and on 
tour. 

The sets are designed and 
executed by Les Moyse, in the 



Victorian manner. The cast is 
composed of Edward Howes of 
Amherst in the role of John Wor- 
thing. John Hines as Algernon. 
Ellen Snyder of Northampton as 
Lady Bracknell; Leslie Pfeil as 
Gwendoline; Sue Foudy as Cecily; 
Richard Thayer as Rev. Chasuble; 
Gene Fahey as Lane; Brent Brown 
as Merriman and Ann Christern as 
Miss Prism. 
Costuming is by Doe Labbee, 



Florence Lusco and Cheryl Gibbs 
and properties by Anne Marie 
Sarkis. Lucy Boswell is stage 
manager and lighting is by Linda 
Lashier, Jackie Murphy and Judy 
Mroz. 

Performances at 8:30 p.m. are 
Thursday through Saturday of this 
week. All seats are reserved. Box 
office hours are 3-8 p.m. daily 
except Sunday. Call 413-773-7991 for 
reservations. 



Free Booklet 
Available 



FREE "Off Campus Ac- 
tivities" 

Pamphlets now available at 
the reception desk of the 
Student Activities Office. 




WASHINGTON 

The Senate considers whether to 
scrap a $5.2-billion antiaircraft 
missile program called the SAM-D. 

New material, vote not expected 
before evening. 

The government asks the 
Supreme Court to order resump- 
tion of the Pentagon Papers trial, 
saying a delay could block it 
forever. 

New material, may stand. 



The PLACE THAT MADE 
AMHERST FAMOUS 
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"But I only came in for an oil change! " 

No Automotive Rip Off's 
SPENCER'S M@bil STATION 

161 NO. PLEASANT ST., AMHERST (Next to P.O.) 
FREE ESTIMATES 
Open 24 hours — Road Service — 256-8426 




Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1972 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1972 



University of Massachusetts — The Crier — Page Five 






**. 





"And your dog is overshod." shouts linger Riherii (above right). Bruce Smith (above) 
and Deborah Hall (far above) are two of the other players in the play "To Happy Marriage 



and Faithful Wives' 



CRIER PHOTOS 
By CARL NASH 



CHAMPION TERMPAPERS 
636 Beacon Street (#605) 
Boston, Mass. 02215 
Research Material for Term- 
ipapers. Reports, Theses, etc. 
(Lowest Prices, Same Day Service. 
JFor information, write or call (617) 
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ii/; g 



FOLK CONCERT 

Leo Lotthe 

Bill Stains 
Mike Cataldo 

Tuesday at the 
Metawampe Lawn 

Sponsored by Summer Program Council 



Bv NANCY NASH 

"To Happy Marriage and Faith- 
ful Wives" is a fine collection of 
comedy skits ranging from five to 
thirty-five minutes in length. These 
skits cover a wide expanse of time 
and place: however, they show 
that the business of courtship and 
marriage has changed very little. 

The play starts with all the 
players coming out and singing 

Love Poems*' by Dorothy Parker. 
This definitely sets the mood for 
what is to follow. 

The first skit takes place in 1889. 
as Bruce Smith. Roger Tiberii and 
Deborah Hall take the stage. 
Tiberri plays an ailing landowner 
in Russia who has come to ask for 
the hand of his neighbor's aging 
daughter. 

Smith, the neighbor who is 
delighted by the offer, sends for his 
daughter, played by Hall. She 
comes out to meet her neighbor, 
not knowing she is about to be 
proposed to. The visit starts out 
well, but quickly deteriorates into 
a fight over the ownership of 
certain lands. 

Before their dispute is settled 
another arises over which family 
has the better hunting dog. In the 
midst of all the arguing, Tiberri 
falls into a fit caused by his 



palpitating heart. 

Smith and Hall, who fear that he 
has died and will never be able to 
make his proposal, strain to revive 
him. As Roger slowly revives 
Debbie cries. "I accept, I accept" 
while her father corroberates this. 

The rest of the play goes on with 
similar skits ranging from 1529 to 
the future. All of these skits are 
characterized by superb acting 
and hilarious lines. The other 
players include Bonnie Bishoff. 
.Janet Toner. Bill Vandergrift. 
Kimberli Wanger and John 
Warhol. 

The unique part of this play was 
that the actors frequently asked 
the audience to hold an apron or 
straighten a necktie. This par 
ticipation gave the audience a 
feeling of being directly involved in 
the play. 

These skits are very much 
worthwhile. 



Letters 



Yes, do send in your comments 
on campus life, international af 
fairs, national emergencies, etc. 
All we demand is that all letters to 
the-editor be typed on a sixty-space 
line, one side of each page, double 
spaced. 



RADIOLOGIC 
TECHNOLOGISTS 

Part T ime openings available in 
modern progressive department 
of teaching hospital, for 
registered or eligible 

technologists. 

7:30a.m. -11:30a.m. 
12 Noon 4:00 p.m. 

5 day week including alternating 

Saturdays. 

8 a.m. 4 p.m. Saturday and/or 

Sunday 

Apply in 

Personnel Department 

SPRINGFIELD HOSPITAL 

HOSPITAL 

MEDICAL CENTER 

759 Chestnut Street 

Springfield 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



DOUBLE FEATURE FILM SERIES 




The 6ms 

of Han rone 

Starring 
Gregory Peck, David Niven, Anthony Quinn 

Sponsored by Summer Program Council 

Student Union Ballroom 
August 2, Wednesday 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 




U.Y.A. Training Begins 



Phase III training for new members of the 
University Year for Action program gets underway 
this morning in the Campus Center, according to Gib 
Fullerton, spokesman for the local office. 

The 05 new members arrived last night and will be 
staying in Cashin Dormitory. They will be receiving 
orientation and training by the local office of UYA 
and training by the specific local agencies for which 
they will work, said Fullerton in a Crier interview. 

This morning's orientation will be conducted by the 
local Amherst office of UYA, said Fullterton, but 
during the week personnel from the Washington 
agency will also participate. "Panel discussions with 
new and old members will also take place", Fullerton 
indicated. 

New members will be trained by their specific local 
agencies from August 4 through 18, explained 
Fullerton. These agencies include Springfield 



Hospitals Project, Belchertown State School, Nor- 
thern Berkshire Community Action, Woodstock 
Preparatory School, Holyoke Community and 
Regional Legal Assistance, and Hampshire Franklin 
Correctional Services. 

Fullerton said some of these agencies will train on 
location while others will use University or other 
facilities. 

On August 19 and 20, wrap-up and evaluation of the 
training program will take place. 

Highlighting this will be "a gathering to recognize 
the program's anniversary and an evaluation of the 
first year," Fullerton said. This will include many 
speakers, some from Washington. 

The rest of the month will be used for the relocation 
of the Phase III members to the community they will 
be serving, Fullerton concluded. 



Woods, Garbage, Brown Today 



Pipelines near completion on Eastman Lane. Details on page one. 
(Crier Photo bv Steve Schmidt) 



Glass Menagerie 
Closes Theatre 

. I TMass Summer Theatre will engagedman home to 



TUESDAY. 5:00 p.m., 

163 Campus Center, Films 

MR. BROWN COMES DOWN 
THE HILL. ..a RAM production (by 
MRA) of 1-1/2 hours duration, set 
in the Britain of today... a black 
man (the gentile?), a harlot 
(society's confirmed sinner), and a 
bishop (the scribe and the 
pharisee?) search for God ...What 
would happen if Christ came to 
earth today, instead of 2,000 years 



ago 9 ... This is a shock treatment of 
today's problems in modern day 
society.... 

"WASTED WOODS" and 
"GARBAGE" 

The Coalition for Environmental 
Quality will be showing two films 
tonight at 6:30 p.m. in Room 163 of 
the Campus Center. The first will 
be "Wasted Woods", a Sierra Club 
film which documents the 
destructive practices of American 



logging industries. The second will 
be "Garbage" which shows gar- 
bage from the time it is thrown 
away until the time it is disposed of 
for "good". 

The two films run 15 and 11 
minutes respectively, so the 
stowings should last no more than 
30 to 40 minutes. Afterward, 
discussions on the issues raised by 
the films may occur if enough 
people wish. 



The UMass Summer Theatre will 
i lose its season with a production 
of Tennessee Williams' award- 
winning play, The Glass 
Menagerie. Performances are 
August 9-13, one week only, at 8:30 
p.m.. in air-conditioned Bartlett 
Auditorium. 

Winners of the Drama Critics 
Circle Award in 1945. The Glass 
Menagerie is a sensitive character 
drama. It tells of the ineffective 
struggles of a small St. Louis 
family -a mother who clings to 
thememory of better days, her shy. 
crippled daughter, and a son who is 
finally driven to leave home after 
unintentionally bringing an 



his sister. 

The production is directed by 
Harry Mahnken of the UMass 
faculty. Scenery is by Paul Won- 
sek. costumes by Katherine Reed, 
and lighting design and technical 
direction by John Woods. 

This is the final week for the 
production of To Happy Marriages 
and Faithful Wives in the air- 
conditioned Studio Theatre in 
South College. Performances are 
August 3, 4 and 5 at 8:30 p.m. 
Tickets for this production and for 
The Glass Menagerie may be 
obtained at the Bartlett Box Office 
or by calling 545-2579 Monday 
through Friday between 10 and 5. 



Waterfront /Guns Fire Wednesday 



At 7 p.m. Wednesday at the 
Student Union Ballroom the 
Summer Program Council will 
show "On the Waterfront', the 
winner of eight Academy Awards. 
It is the true story of a fearless 
Jesuit priest who sets out to smash 
the terror rule of a mob which has 
won the control of a big city's 
waterfront area. It stars Marlon 
Brando. Lee J. Cobb, and Eva 
Marie Saint. 

At 9 p.m. "The Guns of 
Navarone" will be shown. Huge. 



strategically placed German guns 
prevent allied ships from using a 
vital Agean Sea channel. They are 
embedded high upon and deep 
within the island cliffs and are 
invulnerable to attack by land, sea, 
or air. Eight Allied Commandos 
volunteer for the suicidal mission 
to sabotage the impruegrable 
guns. Stars Gregory Peck, An- 
thony Quinn, Brenda Rau, David 
Niven. Irene Papas, Richard 
Harris and James Daren 




Preservation Hall Jazz Bnad entertains 2000-3000 people at Haigis Mall last Thursday evening. (Crier 
Photo by Larry Gold) 



Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BRAND YWINE's 
beautiful new one and two bedroom model apartments. 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few 
minutes we'll show you all the reasons in the world why 
BRANDYWINE is a better place to Uve. We invite you 
to compare features and compare prices. The few 
minutes you spend with our two beautiful models could 
be the most important minutes you'll spend all year. 




Conveniences which make BRANDYWINE so 
eminently 'livable" include: 

Spacious, well laid out units 

All brand name, house sited appliances 

An abundance of closet space 

Individually controlled, central gas heat, air- 
conditioning and cooking included in rent 

Extra soundproofing and security features 

Large, partially enclosed, private patios and 
balconies 

Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 

Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager responsible 
for all apartment services and maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam Furniture 
Leasing Company, Hartford, Connecticut 

One Bedroom Units from $200 
Two Bedroom Units from $225 



i©to*^a/atf |N 




BRANDYWINE at Amherst 



50 MEADOW STREET 

AMHERST 

549-0600 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



Summer Intramurals 



TUESDAY, AUOUST 1, 1972 



TUESDAY, AUOUST I, W2 



University of Massachusetts — The Crier • Page Seven 




A bicycle race for men and women will be held tonight at 7 beginning at the 
stadium road. All participants may sign-up at the Intramurals Office-Boyden #215 
or at the site of the race just prior to starting time. Two separate races will be run, 
one for men (1.7 miles) and one for women (1.0 miles). The races are open to 
summer students, faculty, and staff. 



League Standings 



MENS SOFTBALL STANDINGS AS OF JULY 26, 1972 

WESTERN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE 

PSD 5-0 Gunners 4-0 

Quiver 3-1 Rickies 3-2 

English 2-3 Ringers 3-2 

Education 2-3 Vets 2-2 

Hustlers 0-5 YoYo's 0-6 

CENTRAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Dry Heaves 4-1 Behaviormen 4-1 

Civil Engineering 3-1 Brett 3-2 

MAE 3-3 No Names 2-2 

Piglets 2-2 Rileys 2-3 

Organized Whodunits 0-5 Pipefitters 1-4 



The Voice 

5-2566 



ENTERTAINMENT 

The 11 members of "The 
Waltons" make it the largest 
permanent cast in a TV series. 

From Hollywood, new, by Jerry 
Buck, moved in advance July 30. 



VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS AS 
OF JULY 27 
CO-RECREATIONAL 

Bodies 3-1 

Chuggers 2-1 

Giants 2-1 

Gemocides 1-2 

Upward 0-3 
MEN'S 
LEAGUE A 

PSD 6-0 

Polymers 3-3 

Upward Bound 3-3 

Cyborgs 0-6 

LEAGUE B 

APK 5-1 

Pipefitters 4-2 

Bretts Best 2-4 

Bretts Bums 0-6 



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Swim Meet Results 

JULY 26, 1972 
First'place winners: Men: 



Dave Conroy ' 
Dave Conroy 
Dave Conroy 
Al Spekin 
Bill McCafferty 
stroke 



50 yd. freestyle 

100 yd. freestyle 

50 yd. backstroke 

50 yd. butterfly 

50 yd. Breast- 



Freestyle Relay Team 

Mike Sorenson 

Bob Millette 

Ken McCarter 

Scott Davidson 
Mike Sorenson Diving 

First Place winners: Women: 
Gerry Klimovitch 50 yd. freestyle 
Gerry Klimovitch 100 yd. freestyle 
Pat O'Connel 50 yd. breast 




CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED 



FOR SALE 



Thunderbird, (Ford) '67, 
Landau 4-dr. at/ps/pb, powr 
wndws. New exhaust many 
other features, excel, cond. 
$1250. Call 532-9309 (Holyoke). 

1964 Chevrolet Impala Con- 
vertible, good condition, contact 
Larry at 549-6676 or leave 
message at Crier office. 

' ' i ■■ « ■ ■ ^» 

1969 MGB low mileage, 6 radial 
tires; AAA radio; overdrive; 
reasonable offers only; call 
after 8:30 p.m. nightly or 
anytime orfweekends; 253-7464. 



FOR RENT 



EFF. AND2 1/2-rm. apts. furn., 
all utils., parking, pool, 9 mo. 
lease avail, from Sept. 1. Reas. 
rent Amherst AAotel opp. 
Zayre's. 

8/15 

Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $ 185/ AA incl utilities. Call 
Resident AAgr 665-4239, if no 
answer 1 786-0500. 
8/15 



NOTICES 



42 



FOR SALE CHEAP — 1965 Olds 
442 Body Rough- Engine Good- 
Runs Strong $200 549 6079. 

8/1 

1971 Ford Torino Squire Station 
Wagon V 8, power brakes, 
power steering, gray gold — 
3,000 miles. Best Offer. Call 
253 5641. 

8/15 



22" Black 8. White TV $45., 21" 
Color TV $150. TELEVISION 
C ENTER, 55 North Pleasant St. 
Amherst, 2nd Floor, #253 5100. 

8/15 

1970 Kawasaki Bighorn 350cc, 
great bike for street or trail. 
Very good condition, must sell 
immediately. Call 549 6820. 

8/3 

— ^— — — — I— H^ III II 

Portable Reminq Typewriter 
with RUSSIAN keys. $50. Call 
John Basile 1 734 1655 between 5 
6 p.m. 

8/1 

Kowa Six 2-1/4 x 2 1/4 85 mm 
with hand grip $195.00. Excel, 
cond. "Poor Man's 

Hasselblad". Call 665 3602 after 

5:00. 

8/1,8/8 

Mimaya/Sekor 500 DTL W/$50 
in accessories — $125. Also 2 
guitar AAAP speakers — $30 pr. 
256 6633. 

8/15 



BeanWttn^TWf^fe by 
request. It's about the 60's. It's 
an emotional experience. Plus 
"The Hat Box AAystery" and 
cartoons. Thurs. Aug. 3, 7:15 & 
9:15, Amherst Folklore Centre. 

'3 



GAYS, wishing to meet others, 
come to 911 CCtonite (Thurs.) at 
7:30 or call Student Homophile 
League 5 0154. 

8/20 

You are most welcomed to come 
every Tuesday at 7 p.m. for an 
informal gathering of The 
Christian Science College 
Organization. Hear how Truth 
and Love unfold good for all. 
Campus Center 809. 

8/15 



PERSONAL 



FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207 T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

8/15 

^Tenmslessons by experienced 
instructor. Easy way to learn. 
Good fundamental for beginners 
and intermediates. $l/lesson. 
665 3205. 

8/1 
"■■■mi i M ii m ■ «m— ■ i >«.n«(/,:fjiar 
Male seeks 2 Bi F's, 25 plus for 
enduring menage a trois 
oriented to esthetics and 
eroticism, actively creative. 
Stable yet able to partake of the 
delights. P.O. Box 123, Amherst. 

8/15 
Hndcjut^whatliappeneclat 
Explo 72. Televised Tuesday 
Thursday, August 1 3, Channel 
40, 7 p.m. Channels 7 8.8, B p.m. 
or 9 p.m. Don't miss it. 

8/1 

•■i^BaBMMBMBMMaMB 

Driver Needed — to Miami 
Beach in the middle of August. 
Call 549 1532 after 5 p.m. 

8/10 



HFIPWflliTFP 



HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS — 
Participate in experiment at 
UMass. Earn $4 for 2 hours 
work. Call Rebecca Warren 
between 4 & 7 p.m. at 256 6456. 

8/8 



Childrens' Lobby Seeks Site 



Local Show Starts Friday 



The Valley Children's Lobby has 
put its support behind the efforts of 
regional mental health groups to 
purchase the vacated Nor- 
thampton School for Girls facility 
for a children's service center. 

Faced with a September 1 
deadline, officials of the Hamp- 
shire Association of Mental Health 
and of the Hampshire-Franklin 
Area of Mental Health and 
Retardation are being "stymied by 
the feet-dragging of Governor 
Sargent's administration." 

Through the efforts of State 
Representative John Olver the 
authorization to purchase the 
facility was signed in October, 
1971, but the Governor's office has 
consistently held up doing the 
paperwork necessary to gain title 
to the property. On Tuesday, July 
25, members of Lobby made 
telephone calls to Lieutenant 
Governor Donald Dwight in Boston 
urging him to speed up the 
necessary title search and building 
appraisals so that the project can 
begin. 

Mary Brewer, president of the 
Hampshire Association of Mental 
Health, explained to the Lobby at a 



Astro-Cast 

Aquarians are progressive, concerned 
with subiects such as mind dynamics, 
astrology, ESP and space exploration. 
Aquarius women are difficult to pin 
down; Aquarius men insist on freedom. 
Two Aquarians can get together and 
revise systems, organizations. They are 
willing to tear down in order to rebuild. 
Aquarians sign contracts with Leo, take 
long journeys with Libra, hold 
stimulating discussions with Aries and 

can fall in love with Gemini. 

*•* 

ARIES (March 21 April 19): Accent is 
on money, valuables, prized possessions. 
Family member wants to talk about 
saving and spending. Outline budget. Be 
flexible, but keep ultimate goal in sight. 
Cance r individual figures prominently. 
TAURUS (April 20 May 20): More fun 
is on agenda. You are relieved of ten- 
sions. You have more independence, 
greater freedom of thought and action. 
Deal with Sagittarian. Exchange ideas 
with Cancer. Make new start in new 
direction. 

GEMINI (May 21 June 20): Look 
behind scenes. Dig beneath surface in- 
dications. Check details. Be thorough. 
You find out where proverbial bodies are 
buried. You are trusted'wlth confidence. 
Be discreet. Clandestine meeting may be 
on agenda. 

CANCER (June 21 July 22): You 
cultivate friends, exciting experiences. 
Personal magnetism is evident. Gemini 
and Virgo individuals figure prominently. 
Be ready for exchanges of ideas. Par- 
ticipate in dialogue with one you respect. 
(July 23 Aug 22): One who is stubborn 
tests your patience. Display sense of 
humor. Be flexible in the face of ob 
stacles. Accept added duty. Assume 
responsibility. Professional superior will 
be favorably impressed. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23 Sept 22) : Keep budget 
tight. You may be dealing with associate 
who does not mind spending, just so it's 
your money. Know this and protect 
yourself. Pisces could play prominent 
role. Journey seems on agenda. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23 Oct 22): Assume 
responsibility. Deal firmly with those who 
challenge your abilities. Don't mince 
words. Heed suggestion from older in- 
dividual. Utilize time-make it your ally. 
You need not take back seat. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 Nov 21): Get rid Of 
unnecessary burden. Along with it, toss 
out guilt feelings. Be yourself. Don't cater 
to whims of foolish person. Mate or 
partner makes noise. Be sympathetic, 
reasonable and firm. Then you gain. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 Dec. 21): 
Stress greater independence. Obtain hint 
trom Scorpio message. Set your own 
pace. Remeber diet resolutions. Avoid 
extremes. Deal with Leo. Highlighf 
original concepts. Submit manuscripts, 
format. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 Jan. 19). Home 
affairsdemandattention. Family member 
wants to tell you something. Be a good 
listener. Don't cast first stone. Affair of 
heart is featured. Creativity and 
romantic interests high on agenda. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 Feb II): Deal 
with practical matters. Check fine points; 
read between lines. Be aware of property 
values, potential. Do some personal in- 
vestigating even if this involves travel. 
Sagittarian could figure prominently. 

PISCES (Feb. 18 March 20): Short trip 
could be featured. Avoid scattering 
forces. Finish one thing at a time. Out 
moded concepts art subject to review. Be 
willing to make changes. One who 
advocates otherwise may be misin 
formed. 

-IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY you 
are dramatic, often insistent, certainly 
unique and creative. You I. ake others 
aware when you walk Into a room. Your 
emotions often dominate. This year you 
begin a new cycle and your individuality 
will be emphasized in September. 

(To find out more about yourself and 
astrology, order Sydney Omarr's 50 page 
booklet, "The Truth About Astrology .' 
Send birthdate and 75 cents to ° ma '' r 
Booklet, Mass. Daily Collegian, Box 3240. 
Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 
10017. 

Copyright 1972, Gen. Fea. Corp. 



meeting on July 20 that the 
Governor's office had finally or- 
dered a title search begun. Inex- 
plicably, she said, he chose an out- 
of-town lawyer to do the title 
search, Attorney Abraham Bussell 
of Holyoke. Her efforts to contact 
Bussell were met by a statement 
from his office that he had gone on 
a "long vacation." 

George Dunnington, business 
manager of Williston Academy 
which owns the Northampton 
facility, explained that the 
Academy simply cannot postpone 
their September 1 deadline. He has 
alternative buyers already, and 
though the trustees support the 
children's service center, Dun- 
nington says "the upkeep on the 
place is costing us over $100,000 a 
year." 

The twenty-one acre site in- 
volves twelve buildings, most of 
them houses which would other- 
wise be sold separately as large 
individual homes. All are in ex- 
cellent condition and no renovation 
would be necessary. Brewer ex- 
plained that the alternative is to 
construct a new building on the 
grounds of the Northampton State 
Mental Hospital. Long experience 
has proven, however, that in- 
stitutional care does not help either 
retarded or emotionally disturbed 
children. "We want no more in- 
stitutions," she says. The at- 
tractive grounds and home-like 
atmosphere of the School for Girls 
would be perfect for their needs. 

The proposal for a regional 
children's service center seeks to 
remedy the lack of services for 
mentally retarded and emotionally 
disturbed children in western 
Massachusetts. The Belchertown 
State School for the mentally 
retarded is commonly 



acknowledged to be cruelly 
inadequate. Some children are now 
sent outside the state to receive 
help. The Northampton center 
would offer a diagnostic and 
treatment program for nursery 
school age children as well as a 
nursery school for retarded, 
disturbed, and handicapped 
children. 

In treating or diagnosing older 
children the service center would 
work in close conjunction with the 
regular school systems. At the 
moment special education students 
are required to be in regular 
classrooms, but they often cannot 
get the special attention they need. 
By working with regular school 
systems the project would have a 
more comprehensive area of 
responsibility for children's needs 
than has been true in the past. This 
extension of responsibility is 
strongly supported by the recently 
created state Office for Human 
Services. 

The Valley Children's Lobby has 
over 150 Connecticut Valley 
members, most of them specialists 
in various areas of children's 
services. The Lobby functions as a 
pressure group on the state and 
local level in order to get needed 
legislation for the benefit of 
children and to enforce action on 
existing legislation. More in- 
formation may be obtained from 
Valley Children's Lobby, call 
Beverly Goulet in Florence, Mass., 
586-2130. 



The Amherst Community 
television station is broadcasting 
from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on 
Fridays on cablevision channel 8. 
The studio is located in Amherst 
Regional Junior High School. 

ACTV's "What's Up?" show is 
designed to inform the local 
residents of what is going on in the 
Valley. The staff is composed of 
Jay Appell, general manager; 
Michael Owen, assistant director; 
Brian McCullough, public 
relations; Fred Smead, technical 



director; and Alan George, studio 
director. Also: Jim Campbell, 
news director; Diane Robinson, 
Scott Anderson and Tim Carlisle, 
general staff. 

Publicity chairmen for local 
groups who would like to spread 
the word about their activities 
should get in touch with ACTV, 51 
Blue Hills Rd., Amherst. Send a 
post card telling "What's Up?" 
Broadcasting on the station will 
begin Aug. 4. 



Crossword Puzzle Answer to «-«♦ '»"«'« p»"* 



ACROSS 



w* 



•v. 



BEATLES 
CONCERT FILM 

It's about the sixties. 

It's an emotional experience. 

Plus 
THE HAT BOX MYSTERY 



1 


Flap 


4 


Possessive 




pronoun 


8 


Nuisance 


12 


Ventilate 


13 


Region 


14 


Genus of 




olives 


15 


Artificial 




language 


16 


Surrounding 


18 


Anon 


20 


Organs of 




hearing 


21 


Exclamation 


22 


Conjunction 


23 


Verve 


27 World War II 




agency (init.) 


29 


Emmet 


30 


Midwestern 




Indian 


31 


A state (abbr.) 


32 


Prefix: three 


33 


Aeriform 




fluid 


34 


Pronoun 


35 


Hawaiian 




greeting 


37 


Torrid 


38 


Race of lettuce 


39 


Mine vein 


40 


Ship channel 


41 


Conjunction 


42 


Arabian seaport 


44 


Liquid measure 




(Pi) 


47 


One who makes 




false claim 


51 


Fish limb 


52 


Be borne 


53 


City in 




Nevada 


54 


Period of time 


55 


River in 




Germany 


56 


"Lohengrin" 




heroine 


57 


Corded cloth 



3 Soups 

4 Filament 

5 Sea eagle 

6 Late 

7 Dinner course 

8 Own 

9 Man's name 

10 Unit of 
Japanese 
currency 

11 Label 

17 Conjunction 
19 Babylonian 

deity 
22 Southern 

blackbird 

24 Note of scale 

25 Exchange 
premium 

26 Seines 

27 Spoken 

28 Storage bin 

29 Macaw 

30 Grain 

32 Playhouse 

33 Obtained 



ran tLQE I1EC1R 

nun GiiB^u scr 

hheeh nuanfrran 
nnr-iH ehed? 



& 



a 






EiicEn pnrmn 



36 



Hypothetical 
force 

37 German 
composer 

38 Deliberate 

40 Style of 
painting 

41 Spanish for 
"yes" 



43 Prefix: down 

44 Malay canoe 

45 Weary 

46 Break 
suddenly 

47 In favor of 

48 Free of 

49 Dutch town 

50 Abstract being 





Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1972 



Highlights - 



August 1 

FOLK CONCERT, Leo Kottke, Bill 
Staines, Mike Cataldo, and the Rock 
Quintet, all solo acts, 6:30 p.m., 
Metawampe Lawn (rain: SU 
Ballroom). 
August 2 

Double Feature Film En- 
tertainment: "On the Waterfront" at 
7 p.m. and "Guns of Navarone" at 9 
p.m., SU Ballroom. 

August 4 

TANGLEWOOD— Fromm Special 
Concert 

7 p.m. Weekend Prelude - Phyllis 
Curtin, Aaron Copland, Michael 
Tilson Thomas, Joseph Silverstein, 
Jules Eskin. 

9 p.m. Michael Tilson Thomas - 
Ruggles: Evocations for Orchestra; 
Copland: 8 Poems of Emily 
Dickinson: Phyllis Curtin; 
Wuorinen: Violin Concerto: Paul 
Zukofsky; Stravinsky:- Rite of 
Spring. 
August 5 

TANGLEWOOD 

10:30 a.m. Open Rehearsal 
8:30 p.m. Aldo Ceccato - Men- 
delssohn: Symphony No. 1; 
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3; 
John Browning - Dvorak: "New 
World" Symphony. 
August 6 
TANGLEWOOD 



2:30 Michael Tilson Thomas - 
Haydn: Oboe Concerto; Ralph 
Gomberg - Mahler: Symphony No. 5. 
THEATER 

"Love, Marriage, etc." by Feiffer, 
South College July 27 August 9. 
Curtain time 8:30. Call 545-2579. 

CONNECTICUT 

East Haddam Goodspeed Opera 

House. Tomorrow-Sat., Sunny with 

Leland Palmer. 

Farmington-Triangle Playhouse. 

Tomorrow-Sat., The Gazebo. 

Ivoryton-Playhouse. Tomorrow-Sat., 

The Last of the Red Hot Lovers with 

Sid Caesar. 

New Fairfield Candlewood Theater. 

Tomorrow-Sat., Do I Hear a Waltz? 

with Patrice Munsel. 

Sharon- Playhouse. Tues.-Sat., End of 

Summer. 

Southbury Playhouse. Tues.-Sat., 

Fiddler on the Roof. 

Storrs-Nutmeg Summer Playhouse. 

Tues.-Sat., Cabaret. 

St r atf or d -The American 

Shakespeare Festival. Today, 

Thurs., Sat. mats., Tues. eve., Julius 

Caesar; Wed., Fri. eves., Major 

Barbara; Thurs., Sat. eves., Wed. 

mat., Antony and Cleopatra. 

wallingford Oakdale Music Theater. 

Today, Sandler and Young with Pat 

Cooper; Tues-Sat., Jesus Christ 

Superstar. 



Westport-Country Playhouse. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Jacques Brel with 
Jean Pierre Aumont. 

RHODE ISLAND 
Little Compton Carriage House 
Theater. Today, Tues.-Sat., The Boys 
in the Band. 

Matunuck-Theater-by-the-Sea. 
Today, Tues.-Sat., The Sound of 
Music. 

Providence-Brown University 
Summer Theater in Faunce House 
Arena Theater. Today, Dial M for 
Murder; Wed. -Sat., The Star- 
Spangled Girl. 

Warwick-Musical Theater. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Jerry Vale and The 
Golddiggers. 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Beverly-North Shore Music Circus. 
Tomorrow-Sat., The King and I with 
Betsy Palmer. 

Cambridge-Harvard Summer School 
Repertory Theater, Loeb Center. 
Tomorrow, Wed., Sat., Heartbreak 
House; Thurs., A Moon for the 
Misbegotten; Tues., Fri., The Match- 
maker. 

The Proposition. Wed. -Sat., an 
improvised revue with music. 
Chatham -Monomoy Theater. Wed.- 
Sat., Tartuffe. 

Cohasset South Shore Music Circus. 
Today, Sergio Franchi and Norm 
Crosby; tomorrow-Sat., Fiddler on 
the Roof with Jan Peerce. 



Dennis Cape Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Remember Mai 
Dennis Cape Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Remember Me! 
Easthampton Williston Summer 
Theatre. Wed. at 10:30 a.m., Fri., 
Sat. at 2 p.m., The Emperor's New 
Clothes; Wed., Fri., The Prime of 
Miss Jean Brodie; Thurs., Sat., 
Rhinoceros. 

Falmouth-Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., The Gingerbread Lady with 
Tammy Grimes. 

Highfield Theater. Tues.-Sat., 
Utopia Limited. 

Fitchburg High Tor Summer 
Theater. Tues.-Sat., Milk and Honey. 
Framingham -Chateau de Ville 
Dinner Theater. Today, Tues.-Sat., 
Carousel with John Raitt. 
Hyannis Cape Cod Melody Tent. 
Today, The Mahavishnus Orchestra; 
Tues.-Sat., Hair. 

Lenox- Arts Center. Today, Andre 
Gregory's Company presents 
Beckett's Endgame in open 
rehearsals. Wed.-Sat., Dr. Selavy's 
Magic Theater (composed by Stanley 
Silverman, conceived and staged by 
Richard Foreman). The Poetry 
Series: Today at 5:30, Doris Dana. 
Medford-Tufts Summer Theater. 
Wed.-Sat., Love for Love. 
Nantucket Theater Workshop. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Riverwind. 



A New Brand of J 



Editor's Note: AH Guy Lupo did 
was run a stop sign. Instead of 
imposing a meaningless fine, a 
foresighted judge shows that 
respect for justice is possible at the 
same time as enforcement. 

It had been a warm spring night, 
the week before, a crickets- 
chirping, roll-your-window-down 
night, shortly before 12 o'clock, 
when Guy Lupo and Steve Westfall, 
fellow seniors at R.C. Thomas High 
School, left one party, in the new, 
split-level, freshly-landscaped part 
of the suburb of Webster, and 
headed for another, in an older 
part of town, tall-treed, with 
houses that have pillars. They slid 
into the front seat of Guy's forest- 
green Camaro, with a 307 engine 
and wide-tread tires and pulled 
away from the curb. Guy forgot to 
turn on his lights. And ran a stop 
sign. 
A policeman pulled them over. 
Ten days later Guy Lupo, 18, 
lanky and awkward in his young 
manhood, found himself duly 
charged and standing before Benn 
Forsyth, Webster town justice, 
seated at the V-shaped town board 
table he uses for his bench. As his 
name was called, Guy left his 
girlfriend, Irene Anciukaitis, in the 
seven rows of folding chairs and 
strode forward to enter his plea. 
Forsyth listened: to Guy declare 
he was guilty, and to his ex- 
planation, a bit gratuitious, since 
the judge hadn't asked, but in- 
spired, perhaps, by the stern look 
on his face, that yes, he'd had a few 
beers. But he wasn't drunk; he's 
simply been in a hurry, such a 
hurry the lights had slipped his 
mind, and he'd missed the stop 
sign completely. And now Forsyth, 
clean of face and awesome in his 
black robe, drew himself up in his 
chair, and Guy thought to himself, 
"I'm up the creek— $50 fine and a 
jail sentence;" and Forsyth 
allowed that Guy seemed to have 
been rather reckless, and two 
young men behind Irene An- 
ciukaitis said they figured Guy 
would lose his driver's license for 

sure. 

But Forsyth, 46, a conscience- 
driven man, paused and reflected 
upon one of his deepest concerns. 

"If you drive through our 
suburb.'' he would say, a few days 
later, 'you would see two cars and 
a boat in a lot of driveways, and a 
super-abundance of colored 
television sets, and lawnmowers 
vou ride, not push. In that type of 
economic environment, children 
become supernumeraries— almost 
like playthings or pets. They don't 
see themselves performing any 
useful function in society. And. in 
an effort to find a way to express 
the meaning of their being around. 



they start wrestling their weight 
around— to establish their im- 
portance." 

In this wrestling around, it 
seemed to Forsyth, these 
youngsters reflected an insulation 
from life peculiar to the suburbs, 
an insulation from the unpleasant 
things that tend to give people a 
sense of their own fallibility. "It's 
hard to get these teenagers to stop 
and think," he said. "They seem to 
be the people who think they'll live 
the longest. When I was a kid, 
death and mayhem were for 
somebody else, and that idea has 
persisted. To drive a car without 
headlights through a stop sign is an 
accident on its way to happen. But 
these kids seem absolutely con- 
vinced the Lord is riding on their 
shoulders. 

"Nor is the existing system of 
crime and punishment very ef- 
fective in handling this. In justice 
court, misdemeanors are 
punishable by fines up to $1,000 and 
jail terms up to a year; traffic 
offenses by fines up to $50 and jail 
terms up to 15 days. Most of the 
time, jail is too severe. It can make 
a quasi-martyr out of a kid. On the 
other hand, when a teenager pays a 
fine, his father is usually there with 
the billfold, and maybe the kid 
misses it and maybe he doesn't." 
So the judge, who had impaneled 
youth juries to pass sentences ("In 
many cases the kids know better 
what's best, and it's something fair 
about the system..."), replaced 



policemen with Boy Scouts as his 
court clerks ( "They're just as good 
or better, give the court a different 
image and relieve the policemen 
for active duty..."), assigned 
youngsters to Jaycees instead of 
probation officers ("The average 
probation officer is so damn 
busy...") and ordered defendants 
to wash school buses, ride with 
policemen, clean up the park ("It 
all depends upon what the offender 
really needs..."), looked through 
his tortoise-shell glasses at Guy 
Lupo and said: 

"I'll tell you what I'm going to 
do. I'd like you to work in a 
hospital. I'm going to give you the 
name of the resident director at 
Highland Hospital, and I'll write 
you a letter telling you where and 
when to call him." 

The evening before his sentence 
ended, Guy relaxes with honey- 
blonde Irene Anciukaitis and 
another friend in the soothing 
embrace of a gin and tonic and 
said, "You know, I did help out. I 
enjoyed helping the old people. 
They look at you and they let you 
know they trust you. That im- 
pressed me. 

"And I think this kind of thing 
would slow anybody down. It puts 
the shoe on the other foot. Man, if 
Irene'd come in wracked up, or 
somebody like my mother, I'd go 
after whoever did it and kill 'em. 
Makes you think. If I'd wrack 
somebody up, they'd want to come 
after me." 



A&P-False 

Advertising? 



North Eastham-The Fisherman's 
Players. Tomorrow, Tues., The 
Savior and The Resurrection of J. 
Thadeus Sloan; Wed., Thurs., The 
Clown and Sarah and the Sax; Fri., 
Sat., Color Me Human. 
Orleans Arena Theater. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Celebration. 
Provincetown- PI ay house-on - 
theWharf. Today, A Long Day's 
Journey into Night; Tues.-Sat., 
Anatol (new) with music by Nancy 
Ford and lyrics by Tom Jones. 
South Hadley-Mount Holyoke College 
Summer Theater. Tues.-Sat., Luv. 
Stockbridge- Berkshire Theater 
Festival. Tues.-Sat., Clark and 
Myrna with Vivian Vance and 
George S. Irving. 
Sturbridge Ring A Round 
Playhouse. Today, The Fourposter; 
Tues.-Sat., Tiger at the Gate. 
West Springfield- Storrowton Musical 
Theater. Tomorrow- Sat., Mama. 
Willlamstown-Theater. Tues.-Sat., 
Uncle Vanya with Marcia Tucci. 
Worcester Foothills Theater Com- 
pany, Atwood Hall at Clark 
University. Tues.-Sat., Lovers and 
Other Strangers. 

VERMONT 
Bradford- Repertory Theater. Tues., 
You Know I Can't Hear You When the 
Water's Running; Wed., Night Must 
Fall; Thurs., Fri., Sat., Oliver. 



Changes in Motor 
Vehicles Fees 



Chapter 684, Acts of 1972, 
provides for a change in fees under 
Legislation, Rules and Regulations 
Relating to Motor Vehicles 
(Chapter 90) beginning July 31, 
1972. 

ALL OF THE FOLLOWING ARE 
NOW $3.00 FEES: 

1. The substitution of the 
registration of a motor vehicle or 
trailer for that of a vehicle 
previously registered. 

2. Every additional copy of a 
certificate of registration. 

3. Every additional number plate 



furnished to replace such plates as 
have been lost or mutilated or are 
illegible. 

4. Every copy of any record, or 
any certificate, the fee for which is 
not otherwise provided. 
THE FOLLOWING ARE NOW 
$3.50. 

1. Every certified copy of any 
application or notice filed with the 
Registrar and every certified copy 
of a certificate of registration or 
license. (Duplicate licenses and 
duplicate registration certificates 
are "certified copies.") 



The proposed order contained in 
the complaint would require that 
all advertised products be in stock 
and readily available for sale at 
the advertised prices in each A&P 
store covered by the ad. This 
provision is subject to several 
defenses, including a showing by 
A&P that the unavailable items 
were ordered in adequate time for 
delivery and were delivered to its 
stores in quantities sufficient to 
meet reasonably anticipated 
demands. 

Other provisions of the proposed 
order would require that A&P 
terminate the employment of store 
managers who knowingly violate 
the order, and that it institute a 
program of continuing sur- 
veillance to determine their 
compliance. 

A&P has been given the op- 
portunity to advise the Com- 
mission whether it is interested in 
having the proceeding disposed of 
by the entry of a consent order. 



The Federal Trade Commission 
announced its intention to issue a 
complaint under its consent order 
procedure against The Great 
Atlantic and Pacific Tea Co., Inc., 
420 Lexington Ave., New York 
City. A&P operates more than 4,300 
retail food stores in 37 states, the 
District of Columbia and Canada. 
The proposed complaint alleges 
that A&P, in its advertising in 
various areas throughout the 
United States, has represented that 
during stated time periods the 
various items sr"wn in its ads 
would be readily available for sale 
and conspicuously and readily 
available for sale at or below the 
advertised prices in its stores 
covered by its ads. The complaint 
further alleges that during these 
stated time periods a substantial 
number of the advertised items 
were not readily available for sale 
at or below the advertised prices in 
a number of these A&P stores. 




•WELL. McGOVERN MAY NOT MIND THAT EAGLETON 
DIDN'T LEVEL WITH HIM. BUT I MIND' 

The $4. 7 Million Vacation 

ATI ANT A Ga. - Lamar B. Hill, former president of the First 
National Batik of Cartersville, pleaded innocent today on 177 counts of 
fraud in the alleged disappearance of $4.7 million in securities and cash 

from the bank. . , _ , , , ..,.„. _ n 

Hill 49, was arraigned before U.S. District Court Judge William C. 

OKeliey. He remains free under $500,000 bond. 
The arraignment took only a few minutes. Much of the evidence the 

government plans to use against Hill was disclosed in a bond hearing. He 

is alleged to have spent a large portion of the money in Caribbean and 

Nevada gambling casinos. 
The bank, meanwhile, has filed a $4.7 million damage suit against Hill. 




University of Massachusetts 
August 3, 1972 Volume I, Issue 11 

"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Senate Services Must Pay 
For Space-SUG Board 



By CRIER STAFF 

The Student Union-Campus 
Center Governing Board voted 
Tuesday night to charge the 
Student Senate for the space they 
will utilize for the Student Lecture 
Note Service and not to give free 
space for the Senate's proposed co- 
op. 

In other business, SUG board 
voted to spend up to $7,500 to 
renovate the lobby counter in the 
Student Union, accepted the ap- 
pointment of Noel Hawkins to the 
CC Director Search Committee, 
and designated offices on the 
eighth floor of the CC to themselves 
for use during a 24-hour conference 
this weekend. 

The matter of the Senate ser- 
vices brought up by Bob Chiller, 
Senate treasurer, so he could get a 
commitment from the Board in- 
dicating cooperation for the 
planned coop. Barry Cohen, SUG 
Board Chairperson, explained to 
the board that the executive 
committee (which made up 10 of 
the board's 12 members who 
showed up, the full board has 26 
members) voted against giving 



free space to the coop because of 
its revenue-producing interests. 

Chiller reasoned that the coop, 
which now is planned to carry 
certain food items, will be mostly a 
service from its presence and that 
any profit will be returned to the 
Student Activities Tax Fund and 
will reduce the Student tax. 

Board member Guy Ross ex- 
plained that services in the CC pay 
a space-utilization fee of$4.82 per 
square foot, and this money would 
lower the Campus Center Fee. This 
fee is currently $62.50 per year. 
Ross also pointed out this fee does 
not cover the entire operations cost 
of the building. 

Later, in a Crier interview, 
Chiller said that the coop plans 
have now been set back about six 
months. Also, he noted that the 
decisions have placed the 
operations of the lecture note 
service in doubt. 

"SUG Board is not accountable 
to the students," Chiller said. 
"Students have recourse when the 
Senate does something against 
their wishes but the SUG Board is a 
self-contained entity." 

If the students want a coop, and 



the Senate wants a coop, then the 
SUG Board should be held ac- 
countable to the students," he said. 
If the Senate cannot operate ser- 
vices in the Campus Center for the 
students without paying a fee, 
"Then why are we paying $62.50?" 
he declared. 

Plans for the lobby counter 
renovation call for an enlargement 
of the area by making the center 
paralell with the front of the 
building instead of at at the angle it 
is at now, according to sketches 
made by Terry Grinnan, Campus 
Center Manager. 

This is for adaptation for the 
anticipated increase in the use of 
the lobby when the new library 
tower opens he indicated. Also 
being considered, according to 
Grinnan, is the renovation of the 
Cape Cod Lounge. This might 
include cubicles for studying but 
allowing students to bring in food 
which could be cleaned up by 
Hatch personnel. 

Referring to the SUG Board's 
planned conference, Cohen said 
that it is intended to identify plans 
and goals for the coming year. 




Best, Economics Professor, 
Reappointed To 3 -Year Term 



Michael Best, associate 
professor of economics, has been 
reappointed for a three-year term 
by Dr. Robert L. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs. 
The decision culminates a two- 
year controversy over Best. 

In 1970 the Economics Depart- 
ment voted not to extend Best's 
contract officially because of non- 
publication and rumorly because 
of a differing philosophy within the 
department. Student clamoring 
caused a reconsideration of the 
vote and won Best a year's ex- 
tension. 

This year the Department of 
Economics once again decided to 
vote for non-reappointment for 

Voter Drive 
To Start 

By BRUCE J. DORA 

Skip Casper, Brown House 
Senator, is requesting summer 
students returning this Fall to 
work on a voter registration drive. 
Those wishing to help are asked to 
contact Skip by calling 665-4795 or 
by leaving a message in his Senate 
mailbox in the Student Activities 
area. 

To register one needs to be 18 
years old by election day, 
November 7, and prove Amherst 
residency for any amount of time. 
According to Casper, "We have 
sufficient influence in the town and 
we should make it known. We (18- 
20 year olds) have gained the right 
to vote and should assert that right. 
The University holds the record for 
one day of voter registration at 
600; in the entire city of Boston the 
number is 400--we're out to break 
that record." 

Registration deadline for the 
September 19 primary is August 
19. 



Portable Circus 
Coming Wednesday 

On Wednesday, August 9 at 9 p.m., the Summer Program Council will 
present The Portable Circus in the Campus Center Auditorium. 

In a style reminiscent of Firesign Theatre or the Ace Trucking Com- 
pany, Portable Circus mixes light comedy with biting satire, con- 
centrating on social and cultural issues. 

Founded in 1969 at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut as an un- 
dergraduate improvisational comedy group, the Circus is a group of five 
performers who through a series of lively comedy sketches examines the 
effects television, the universal medium, has on all of us. 

Contraceptive Use 
Increases Says Study 



Best. And once again student 
concern for a competent teacher 
and fellow colleagues of Best 
helped fight that action until 
Gluckstern's decision became 
necessary. Gluckstern stated, 
"that while both sides of the issue 
were equally weighed and there 
were good arguments for both 
sides of the controversy, Best's 
excellent ability as a teacher and 
his ablity to interact well with 
students were the deciding factors. 



Shortly after the decision had 
been reached, Dr. Simon Rot- 
tenberg, head of the Department of 
Economics, handed in his 
resignation. According to 
Gluckstern, Rottenberg's 
resignation has been accepted and 
he will be remaining at the 
University as a professor in the 
Economics Department. 

Best and Rottenberg are out of 
town and were unavailable for 
comment. 



Kissinger Reports Back 

WASHINGTON (AP) - Henry Kissinger is back from Paris in a 
renewed effort to break the Vietnam peace talks stalemate. 

A White House spokesman said President Nixon's assistant for 
national-security affairs returned Tuesday night from the secret talks 
with Hanoi Politburo member Le Due Tho and Xuan Thuy, head of North 
Vietnam's Paris delegation. 

Kissinger, who has made 14 previous trips to the French capital for 
private talks, relayed a terse report to Nixon before boarding an Air 
Force jet for the return flight to Washington. He will give the President a 
more detailed account today at the White House. 

White House officials and North Vietnamese spokesmen in Paris 
refused to discuss details of the talks. 

Kissinger flew to Paris on Monday - four days after Nixon told a news 
conference "we hope to do everything we can to bring this war to an end" 
in the three months before the election. 

Nixon also said then, "The chance for a negotiated settlement is better 
now than it has ever been." 

But he said end-the-war resolutions in Congress are encouraging Hanoi 
to stall on productive talks. And, without mentioning names, he implied 
that Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern's statements on 
Vietnam are undercutting efforts to negotiate a settlement. 

One aim of Kissinger's recent travels - he was in Paris two weeks ago 
for another round of secret talks - appears to be convincing the North 
Vietnamese they should talk seriously now rather than waiting the out- 
come of the November election. 

But before the new trip, associates indicated that Kissinger was not 
optimistic on the chance of progress. 

Tuesday's secret meeting was believed to have taken place in a house 
provided by the French government in the suburbs of Paris. The two- 
sentence announcement by White House press secretary Ronald L. 
Ziegler said only that Kissinger was in Paris meeting with the two North 
Vietnamese negotiators and was expected to return to Washington 
Tuesday night 



NEW YORK — The use of the 
most effective contraceptive-the 
pill, sterilization and the loop- 
increased from 37 per cent ot ail 
birth control practices in 1965 to 58 
per cent in 1970, a National Fer- 
tility Study found. 

The study, reported Wednesday, 
said this change was undoubtedly 
the main explanation for a decline 
in the rate of unwanted child- 
bearing over those years and a 
major factor in a drop in the 
nation's birth rate. 

Dr. Charles F. Westoff, Prin- 
ceton University sociologist and 
co-director of the study, said "one 
of the most dramatic findings" was 
that voluntary sterilization had 
become the most popular method 
of contraception among couples 
where the wife was 30 years of age 
or older. 

In 25 per cent of such couples 
practicing birth control, the study 

Rainy Films 
Planned 
For Tuesday 

The Summer Film Program will 
present two films on Tuesday, 
August 8 in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. The first film will be 
"A Walk in the Spring Rain" at 7 
p.m. with Anthony Quinn and 
Ingrid Bergman. "Baby the Rain 
Must Fall", the love story of a born 
loser, starring Steve McQueen and 
Lee Remick will be shown at 9 p.m. 
There is no admission charge. 



found, the wife elected to have a 
tubal ligation or the husband chose 
a vasectomy, with the operations 
about equally divided among the 
men and women. 

Among all married couples of 
reproductive age, the oral con- 
traceptive was "far and away" the 
leading contraceptive used by 34 
per cent of the couples, up from 24 
per cent five years earlier. 

Sterilization was elected by 16 
per cent, up from 12 per cent. And 
use of the loop, or IUD for in- 
trauterine devices, increased 
sevenfold from less than 1 per cent 
to nearly 5 per cent. 

Use of the more traditional 
methods -diaphragm, condom, 
rhythm, withdrawal and douche- 
all declined over the half-decade. 

"The modernization of con- 
traceptive practice by U.S. 
married couples has taken place," 
Planned Parenthood -World 
Population noted, "fairly 
uniformly among blacks and 
whites, and among couples of 
widely varying educational levels. 
Whereas earlier studies had shown 
a considerable gap in practice of 
the most effective contraception 
between women of lower and 
higher education, this gap was 
shown to be nearly closed." 

The 1970 National Fertility Study 
was based on interviews with 5,884 
married women younger than 45 
and living with their husbands, and 
was compared to the 1965 study, a 
survey of 4,810 such women. The 
study did not include data on 
women who had never been 
married 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1972 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in the Campus 
Center, Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for 
the contents. No copy is censored by the administration before 
Publication. Represented for national advertising by National 
Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



1 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

PERFORMING ARTS EDITOR El,eni Koch 

PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



OCCASIONAL EDITORIAL CARTOONIST 
SUMMER SPORTS EDITOR 

The Threshold of a relationship. 



V. 



Shelly Karp 
Ed Bryant 



J 



Campus Carousel 



Coed Living., Money 



Bv TONY GRANITE 
UN-LIBERATED FROSH 
COEDS at Louisiana State must 
like the security of dormitory 
closing hours and required sign-in, 
sign-out procedures. 

According to a Daily Reveille 
report, 75 per cent of next year's 
entering class of women have 
chosen this option of the three 
available to them. They could have 
chosen self-regulated dorm hours, 
with required sign-in sign-out, or 
self-regulated hours with optional 
sign-in sign-out. 

Whatever happened to La Dolce 
Vita? 

SPEAKING OF HIGH LIVING 

reminds that a budget slash of $1.6 
million at the University of Oregon 
has resulted in personnel cuts 
among faculty and physical plant 
workers. 

According to the Portland State 
Vanguard, 41.97 full-time faculty 
positions will be eliminated and 13 
non-tenured faculty have already 
been given notices. Nine classified 
and 50 full-time physical plant 
employees have also been 
dismissed. 

All administrators are still on the 
job. however. 

**** 

STAR REPORTERS AT MIAMI 

included student staffers of Nor- 
thern Illinois U.'s Northern Star. A 
page one story reveals that Bruce 
Gill and Chuck Ruch were among 
the 15,000 news media people 
covering the Democratic national 
convention. They were among the 
handful of college editors accredited 
by the convention. 

Gill is the Star's editorial editor. 
He covered the happenings inside 
the convention hall. Ruch is next 
fall's editor-in-chief, who covered 
the happenings outside the hall. 

Today. the conventions; 
tomorrow, the White House? 

BAD (HECK PASSERS HELP 
EMPLOYMENT AT Indiana 
University, according to a recent 
feature in the Indiana Daily 
Student. 

Two men are employed full time 
and one man works part-time at IU 
to handle the more than 9,000 
"dishonored" checks made out to 
the University this year. 

The Bursar attributes the 



problem to honest mistakes, lack 
of responsibility, and parents who 
tell their children, "Write the 
check, we'll cover it." 

Bad checks have discouraged 
many local business men from 
handling student checks. But this 
may change with the introduction 
in Bloomington of a small claims 
court, where local merchants (and 
presumably the University) can 
prosecute passers of bad checks 
for $5 in court costs. 

It's the bounce that counts. 



MONEY IS THE ROOT of the 

publishing problems of the 
Mankato (Minn) State Daily 
Reporter, which chalked up double 
its usual annual deficit, this year. 
When the Publications Board 
discovered the more than $12,500 
inkling, it also heard a spate of 
recommended solutions. 

One was to appoint a 
professional business manager to 
"see that the editor would have the 
climate to put out an outstanding 
newspaper free from financial 
worries." 

The new student editor-in-chief 
said he would compromise with 
this proposal in that he would be 
willing to see a faculty member 
paid to act only in an advisory 
capacity. 

The chairman of the journalism 
department argued that "it would 
be difficult to find qualified people 
under such conditions." 

At which stalemate the meeting 
rndcd. 




At Least I Had The Guts To Admit It 

Art Buchwald 



All About Dike-Bombing 



WASHINGTON-Is the United 
States bombing the dikes in North 
Vietnam or isn't it? That is the 
question. President Nixon and 
Secretary of Defense Laird say we 
are not. The secretary general of 
the United Nations, the president 
of the World Council of Churches 
and Jane Fonda say we are. 
Whom is one to believe? 
To find an answer to the 
problem, I called Wellback Fish- 
bind, the world's leading authority 
on dike bombing. 

Wellback told me, "I believe 
both sides are telling the truth. The 
Americans are not bombing the 
dikes in North Vietnam, but the 
dikes are being bombed by the 
Americans." 
"How can that be?" 
"The Americans have strict 
orders to bomb only military in- 
stallations, power plants and 
moving targets. They have specific 
orders not to bomb the dikes. 
Therefore, President Nixon and 
Secretary of Defense Laird are 
telling the truth. 

"Unfortunately, these dikes are 
located next to the military 
targets. So, when the Americans 
bomb the military sites, they can't 



help but hit the dikes. The 
secretary general of the United 
Nations, the president of the World 
Council of Churches and Jane 
Fonda, therefore, are also telling 
the truth." 

"But there seems to be a 
credibility gap somewhere," I 
protested. 





tuu is 



TO Ml YOU IACTH MUMS WIITIN' HOMI I MCI THIS.' 



"It depends on where you are. If 
you're sitting in the White House, 
you obviously feel the North 
Vietnamese should build their 
dikes farther away from their 
military targets, so American 
planes won't hit them. 

"But if you're in a bomb shelter 
in North Vietnam, you feel that the 
dikes built close to military sites 
should be spared." 

WeuTjack said, "The thing to 
keep in mind is that no one likes to 
bomb dikes. There's very little 
satisfaction in it. You hit an oil 
refinery with a bomb, and you get a 
helluva thrill out of seeing it to up 
with a whoosh. But when you hit a 
dike the bomb lands with a dull 
thud, and you have no idea if you're 



doing any good or not. It's the same 
thing with a dam. There's no thrill 
to shooting rockets at a dam. But if 
you can shoot up a military 
barracks or a moving convoy you 
know you're earning your money." 

"I never thought of it like that." 

"As I see it," Wellback said, "it's 
really North Vietnam's problem. 
They have too many dikes. It's 
almost impossible to hit anything 
worthwhile in the country without 
hitting a dike. The way the North 
Vietnamese can avoid having their 
dikes bombed is to take them down 
so we can't destroy them." 

"That would be one solution," I 
agreed. 

"It isn't our fault that Hanoi built 
so many dikes. We'd be grateful if 
they didn't have any at all. They're 
absolutely useless to us. As a 
matter of fact, they're hurting our 
entire bombing strategy." 

"But if they didn't have dikes 
their land would flood." 

"That's their problem. Do you 
know that not one country club in 
North Vietnam has been destroyed 
by our bombing? Why do you think 
that is?" 

"I have no idea." 

"Because there isn't a country 
club in North Vietnam. Now if they 
didn't have any dikes in North 
Vietnam, then we wouldn't destroy 
any, weould we?" 

"I guess not," I said. 

"Since the North Vietnamese 
insist on having dikes, and we 
insist on bombing North Vietnam," 
Wellback said, "we won't stop 
bombing until they pull out their 
dikes, and they won't stop building 
dikes until we stop the bombing." 

"That sounds like an impasse," I 
said. 

"Exactly. And there is nothing to 
prevent us from bombing im- 
passes. President Nixon has made 
that perfectly clear." 

Copyright 1972, Los Angeles 
Times 



Jack Anderson 

Some Past And Present Election Dirt Buried 




WASHINGTON - It happens every four 
years. A national election turns into a 
national free-for-all. 

According to the old math of American 
politics, everything during an election is 
reduced to its lowest common denominator. 
Candidates become cartoon-like 
caricatures; issues become simple-minded 
rallying cries; the presidency is streaked 
with mud. 

We have learned that American's two 
veteran antagonists - Hubert Humphrey and 
Richard Nixon - on occasion have put in- 
tegrity first and their political ambitions 
second. 

As Vice President during the 1968 cam- 
paign, Humphrey read the secret diplomatic 
cables from Saigon He learned from these 
cables that high-ranking Republican fund 
raisers were pressuring President Thieu in 
South Vietnam to boycott tno proposed 
p<?ace talks until after the election. This 
prevented the Democrats from softening the 
war issue, which Nixon was using against 



them. 

Humphrey acknowledged to us that he had 
seen the cables, but said he had refused to 
use them against Nixon. 

"A scandal like this would have clouded 
the Vietnam issue and divided the country 
unnecessarily," he said. "I was convinced 
that Richard Nixon knew nothing about 
what was going on in Saigon." 

Earlier, following the 1960 election, 
Richard Nixon was furnished evidence that 
Democrats had stuffed the ballot boxes in 
three crucial states - Illinois, Missouri and 
Texas. This gave John Kennedy 61 electoral 
votes, the margin he needed to win the 
presidency. 

Republicans uncovered numerous 
irregularities. In Chicago, thousands of 
Democrats supposedly turned out in 
districts wiped out by new superhighways. 
In St. Louis, seven Republican wards 
somehow turned Democratic overnight and 
voted heavily against Nixon. In numerous 



small towns in Texas, Democratic ballots 
outnumbered citizens two to one. 

Republican leaders were pressing for a 
court fight that would have dragged on for 
months and left the country's leadership in 
doubt for the duration. 

Ten davs after the election, John Ken- 
nedy, the apparent winner, visited Nixon in 
Key Biscayne, Fla. 

"Well, I guess we really don't know how 
this thing is going to be resolved," said 
Kennedy. 

"Yes we do," said Nixon. "You won." 

Meanwhile, Earl Mazo, the chief political 
reporter for the New York Herald Tribune, 
began a 12-part series exposing Democratic 
election shenanigans. After the fourth story, 
Nixon called Mazo into his office. 

As Mazo remembers the incident, "I told 
him that the election had been stolen out of 
his eyeballs. He laughed. Then he got 
serious. He said it was important that I stop 
my articles." 

Then Nixon confide why he had refused 



to contest the election. "Our country at this 
time can't afford the agony of a con- 
stitutional crisis," he said, "and I damn well 
will not be a party to creating one just to 
become President." 

Such incidents emphasize that politics is 
not always an end in itself. Even the most 
ambitious men have served their country 
worthily. 

Footnote: Senator George McGovern 
gave up a night's rest and went 200 miles out 
of his way recently so that three teen-age 
constituents could visit their parents in the 
hospital. McGovern found the youngsters 
late one Friday night stranded in the Min- 
neapolis Airport after they had been 
bumped off the last connecting flight to their 
hometown of Wagner, S.D. The youngsters 
told the senator that their parents had been 
in an automobile accident. McGovern 
quickly offered to fly the threesome to 
Wagner in his chartered plane, even though 
McGovern 's destination was Aberdeen, 235 
miles to the north. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1972 



University of Massachusetts — The Crier - Page Three 




Intramural Bike Race 



Crier Photo by Larry Gold 




Special Events Winners in the Summer Intra murals program from left to right: 
Bob Millette- Swimming; Mike Sorenson- Swimming; Steve Mosher-Cy cling; 
Gerry Klimovitch-Swimming; Dave Conroy-Swimming; Bill McCafferty- 
Swimming; Janice Herlihy-Cycling. 
Crier Photo by Larry Gold 



Martino, Cohen - 

WEf T SPRINGFIELD - The Al 

Martino Show, starring Al Martino 
and Myron Cohen, opens at 
Storrowton Theatre for one week 
only on Monday, August 7. 

Al Martino, who recently 
completed the highly acclaimed 
movie, "The Godfather", por- 
traying the part of Johnny For- 
tune, has been a top recording and 
nightclub attraction for almost 
three decades. 

Born into a music loving Italian 
household, Al Martino started his 
career as a part-time bricklayer 
for his father during the day, and in 
the evenings he would work the 
local clubs as a singer. 

Myron Cohen, one of the best 
storytellers in the United States, 
has appeared at all the leading 
nightclubs in the nation. Once a top 
salesman for twenty-five years for 
a silk concern, he decided to enter 
show business at age 42. 

Mr. Cohen has performed in 
almost every facet of theatre, 
except films, preferring live 



Opens Aug. 7 

audiences to the movie industry. 
Born in Russia, he was brought to 
America when he was one year old. 
He remarks, "I never would have 
been a success as a comedian in 
Russia." 

Al Martino and Myron Cohen will 
combine their talents to present an 
evening of song and laughter at 
Storrowton Theatre. Tickets for 
the Al Martino Show and all the 
Storrowton Theatre attractions are 
available at the Storrowton 
Theatre box office, located at the 
site of the orange and green tent on 
the Exposition grounds or by 
calling 732-1101 in the Greater 
Springfield area or 522-5211 in the 
Greater Hartford area. 



% 



JACK VER0NESI 
& FRIENDS s ^ 

m Ph*ntom of fh$ Optra' 

Amherst Folklore Ctr. 



DOUBLE FEATURE FILM SERIES 



k Walk In The 
Spring Rain 

Anthony Quinn 
Ingrid Bergman 



7 p.m. 



Baby 
The Rain 

Itati Fall 

Steve McQueen 
• p.m. 



Sponsored by Summer Program Council 

Campus Conttr Auditorium 
Tuesday, August C 

Free Admission— UMass Summer Students First 



Olver Gains 
Needed Signatures 



NORTHAMPTON - Over 6000 
registered and unregistered 
nomination signatures have been 
gathered by supporters of State 
Senate candidate, State Rep. John 
W. Olver. 

The signatures, which ap- 
parently are the highest number 
gathered by any candidate for 
state office in the Franklin- 
Hampshire district, were solicited 
by a volunteer effort that included 
over 200 people. Intense signature 
gathering lasted for only two 
weeks. 

Olver was pleased with the 
volunteer effort, that includes 
mailing thank yous to all the 
signers. He said, "This represents 
a great amount of effort from 
many people. It is the first step in 



building the type of organization in 
all 42 towns and cities of this 
district, that will bring us victory 
in November." 

Olver, who was active in the 
Legislature throughout most of the 
signature gathering process, 
added, "What pleased me most 
was the wide distribution of signers 
from all the towns. Besides 
gathering nearly 1000 from places 
such as Amherst, Northampton, 
South Hadley and Greenfield, we 
gathered large numbers from 
many of the smaller towns, such as 
Buckland, Erving, Chester and 
others. 

"With this type of massive effort 
behind us, our organization should 
have the ability to carry our 
campaign into all the towns of the 
district." 



Beatles Concert At 
Folklore Centre 



If someone were to tell you that 
there existed on film a record of 
the Beatles' first concert in the 
U.S.A. - capturing the madness of 
Beatlemania, expressing the 
beginning of a New Music, and 
candidly exposing the early per- 
sonalities of four of the most 
famous individuals in history - 
what would your reaction be? 

Probably, one of incredible 
enthusiasm and excitement, 
especially if you were once a true 
Beatle freak (as so many of us still 
are). 

A film never released publicly, 
once destined to be destroyed by 
its' creators (NBC), will now be 
shown locally, this Thursday 
evening at the Amherst Folklore 
Centre. The film runs the entire 

length of the concert, as the 
Beatles sing such memorable 
tunes as "Roll Over Beethoven," 
"She Loves You," "Please Please 
Me," "I Saw Her Standing There," 
and other classics from their early 



days. Sound quality is excellent; 
multiple camera technique 
enhances viewing, and provides 
coverage similar to more recent 
concert films. 



Screen times are 7:15 and 9:15, 
this Thursday evening, August 3. 
The Concert film will be shown 
with "The Hat Box Mystery" and 
cartoons. The Folklore Centre is 
located at 16 Spring Street in 
Amherst, near the Lord Jeff. 



f 



■.%«.•.•.•.• 



•<> 



BEATLES 
I CONCERT FILM 

■: : : 

xj It's about the sixties. 

•:£ It's an emotional experience. 

% Plus 

§:"THE HAT BOX MYSTERY' 

and Cartoons 



S 



1 



THURS., AUG. 3 

Amherst Folklore Centre 
7:15*9:15 










- • ■ ■ — 



-. .n». -.-.- 4 ^— 



Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1972 



FDA Bans DES Pats Face Raiders Saturday 



WASHINGTON - Congressional 
sources said the Food and Drug 
Administration plans today to ban 
the further manufacture of the 
suspected cancer-causing hor- 
mone DES for cattle feed. 

There was no immediate com- 
ment from the FDA on reports by 
congressional sources close to the 
House Agriculture Committee that 
the ban would block feeding of 
DES-diethystilbestrol-to cattle 
after January 1973. 

DES, a synthetic hormone, is fed 
to cattle to boost weight gains. 
Federal law says cancer-causing 
agents cannot be fed to animals 
when residues occur in meat. 

The FDA said in June it would 
propose a ban on DES as a means 
of opening the question to a public 
hearing. The Agriculture 
Department has reported finding 
cases of illegal DES in cattle. 



DES has been fed to about 90 per 
cent of the nation's beef cattle to 
spur growth. It has been estimated 



by economists that a ban on the 
additive would boost consumer 
beef prices by about $3.85 per 
person annually. 

Congressional sources said 
implants of DES would be allowed, 
such as placing it in pellet form in 
the ear of the animal. 



Along with studies showing that 
laboratory animals fed the drug 
developed cancer, medical 
researchers have told of finding 
vaginal cancer among a small 
number of young women whose 
mothers took the compound to 
avoid spontaneous miscarriages 
during pregnancy. 

Backers of the use of DES in- 
sisted there has been no proven 
case where humans suffered 
cancer by eating meat from cattle 
which had been fed the growth 
hormone. 

But opponents of the livestock 
drug contended the FDA has been 
delaying action toward enforcing 
federal law to protect the public. 



Garrison House 
Lecture At Deerfield 

Dr. Abbott Lowell Cummings, Director of the Society for the Preser- 
vation of New England Antiquities, will speak at Historic Deerfield on 
Friday, August 4. His lecture, on "The Garrison House Myth: Frontier 
Building in New England", will be held at the White Church (Community 
Center) on Memorial Street in Old Deerfield at 8:00 P.M. 

Abbott Lowell Cummings is a well-known authority on early New 
England architecture and consultant on its preservation. As Director of 
the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities in Boston, he 
oversees the preservation and interpretation of more than 50 historic 
houses throughout New England. Dr. Cummings has published numerous 
books and articles on various aspects of the arts in early America. He is 
the author of forthcoming book on the 17th century architecture of 
Massachusetts. 

The garrison house was a blockhouse built of hewn logs, which was used 
also as a dwelling house. These buildings appeared on the New England 
frontier in the 17th and 18 centuries. Contrary to widespread popular 
belief, log houses were very rare in colonial New England. In his Deer- 
field lecture, Dr. Cummings will draw upon his extensive research in 
early New England architecture to discuss what sorts of structures were 
actually built on the New England frontier in the early years of set- 
tlement. 

Friday's lecture will be open to the public. Admission is free and all are 
welcome. 



By ED BRYANT 

The biggest test so far for the 
seventy-plus players still on the 
New England Patriots' roster will 
come this Saturday night, in a 
preseason game against the 
Oakland Raiders in Oakland. The 
Raiders were Division Champions 
for four consecutive years until 
last year's second place finish. The 
Patriots will be looking for the 
second straight win over the 
Raiders, whom they upset 20-6 in 
last year's opening game. 

Winning, however, is not 
necessarily the most important 
thing. The six-game preseason 
schedule is designed to give the 
coaches a chance to look at new 
players, and to give the offensive 
and defensive units some time to 
get accustomed to playing 
together. While the coaches like to 
win, it is more important that they 
garner the intelligence necessary 
to winning in the regular season, 
which begins September 17 against 
Cincinnati. So while the fans pay 
the same price for tickets as for a 
regular game, they will not see a 
full-fledged NFL Game. 

For the Patriots, this will be far 
less chaotic than last year's game 
against Minnesota. This year, the 
personnel of the team is fairly 
stable; if it is impossible to say 
now who will be starting in Sep- 
tember, it is possible to name the 
candidates. A few more players 
may arrive via trade or waivers, 
but the essence of this year's team 
will come from the players who are 
already here. New England is no 
longer the scavenger of the NFL. 

Players to watch in Saturday 



night's game (which will be 
televised here at 11:00 p.m.) in- 
clude Ken Price, who is starting in 
place of Steve Kiner a weak side 
linebacker, and Dick Blanchard, 
the starting linebacker on the 
strong side. Veteran Ed 
Weisacosky is coming back to 
challenge Blanchard, but Blan- 
chard could win himself a job. Also 
the contests at cornerback and 
wide receiver will tell a lot about 
who will play this year. Larry 
Carwell is a starter at cornerback, 
but Ron Bolton, a rookie, is 
challenging him. At wide receiver, 
Hubie Bryant and Tom Reynolds 
will fight it out for a starting 
position. 

Patriot fans will get their first 
looks at Bob Windsor, John Tarver, 
and John Benien, but they may 
well be but fleeting glimpses. 
Windsor and Tarver have both had 

Control of Marine 
Pollution Asked 

GENEVA - The United States 
called today for concerted in- 
ternational action to control 
marine pollution. 

U.S. delegate John R. Stevenson 
told the U.N. Sea bed Committee 
the principles guiding the common 
effort to control and reduce marine 
pollution should be incorporated in 
the future universal law of the sea. 

Stevenson said the United States 
planned to go ahead and propose 
new rules in other bodies dealing 
with maritime questions. These 
would include a rule requiring port 
nations to refuse entry to any new 
commercial tankers that do not 
possess an international tanker. 



but a few days to learn the 
Patriots' offense, and Benien will 
be splitting the punting with Joe 
Spicko and Mitch Robertson. 

Another slot that is wide open is 
fullback. Jack Maitland, Bob 
Gladieu*. Odell Lawson, and 
Henry Matthews will all have a 
shot at the position. 

Until this point players' fates 
have risen and fallen according to 
their performance in practice 
against their teammates, guys 
they eat with, live with, people they 
know as friends. Starting Saturday 
night, they will be judged on how 
they perform against people who 
would like to have them for dinner. 
Who is eating pre-game meals in 
September is dependent on the 
next six weeks. The quasi-war 
begins Saturday night. 



Sugarloaf Track Results 



By TOM DERDERIAN 

The Sugarloaf Track meets are 
held every Thursday night through 
the Summer commencing at 6:00 
and include all regular running 
events for men and women. This 
week a 1500 meter steeplechase 
will be the featured event. 

The results of last Thursdays 
meet: 220 1st heat, 1 Bob Slate 24.7, 
2. Dave Whitmarsh 26.2, 3. Rick 
Halle 26.6 



2,100 Year Old Japanese 
Mummy Found 



TOKYO - The body of an 
aristocraic woman who died 2,100 
years ago has been found in China 
amid more than a thousand burial 
accessories of untold historical 
value. 

She apparently was the Mar- 
chioness Li Tsang, and she died in 
middle age leaving no special 
mark on her times. 

Around the mummified remains, 
described as in a fair state of 
preservation, were accessories 
including silk fabrics, lacquer- 
ware, bamboo and wooden uten- 
sils, pottery, grain, food, and 
specially made funerary objects. 

The discovery was made in a 
tomb on the outskirts of Changhsa. 
the capital of Hunan Province. 

Hsinhua, the Chinese news 
agency, described the finds with 



uncharacteristic enthusiasm: 
"These are among the most im- 
portant and extremely rare relics 
recently found. They are of great 
value of studying the history, 
culture, handicrafts, and medicine 
and preservatives of the period." 

Japanese experts commenting 
on the report go further and call 
this the discovery of the century. 
The corpse and its accessories will 
give an unparalleled glimpse into 
the science, art, technology and 
handicrafts of the time, they 
predict. 

Hsinhua's account says: "Half 
immersed in reddish fluid, the 
fairly well preserved corpse is 
wrapped in 20 silk clothes of 
various types. The fibers of the 
subcutaneous loose connective 
tissue remain distinct and 



elastic..." 

The tomb was 66 feet deep, with 
six coffins placed one within 
another. Heaped around the walls 
and on top of the outermost coffin 
was a foot or so of charcoal 
weighing about five tons and 
sealed by white clay two to four 
feet thick. 

"It is probably due to these air- 
tight layers and some other 
treatment that the corpse, coffins 
and many burial accessories are 
free from decay," said Hsinhua. 

The body is believed to be that of 
the wife of the first Marquis Tai, Li 
Chu-tsang, also known as Li Tsang, 
who lived about 190 years before 
Christ. A petty noble who ruled 
over 700 households, he apparently 
dearly loved his wife. 



2cd heat: 1. Rich Gargsgliano 
26.0. 2. Rick Elfman 26.4, 3. Jim 
McKenna 26.8, 4. Rick DonLevi 
27.8. 

440 "kids": l. Johney Cushing 
1:34.3, 2. Elisbeth Wilson 1:36.7, 3. 
Barry French 1:37.5, 4. Rick 
| McGinn 1:37.8. 

100 yards: 1. Bob Ross 10.4, 2. 
Bob Slate 10.8, 3. Dave Whitmarsh 
11.4, 4. Baarton Drake 12.0. 

2cd heat: 1. Rick Gargliano 11.2, 
2. Rick Dunlevy 11.4, 3. Rick Halle 
12.0, 4. Dave Whitmarsh 12.0. 

800 yards: 1. Tom Faulkner 
2:15.6, 2. Ed Calabrese 2:19.4, 3. 
Rick McKenna 2:24.8. 

Womens mile: 1. Mary Cushing 
7:26.8, 2. Kay Moran 7:30.8, 3. 
Mary Wilson DNF 

440 yards: 1. Ken Banda 54.8, 2. 
Tom Faulkner 57.4, 3. Rick Halle 
58.2, 4. Rick Gargliano 58.6. 

Mile: 1. Rick Elfman 5:03.5, 2. 
Bart Drake 5:04.4, 3. Charles 
Moran 5:15, 4. Bill Wilson 5:38. 

2 Mile: 1. Pj Phil Page 10:54.3, 2. 
Ed Calabrese 10:54.3, 3. John 
Waldron 11:00.0, 4. George Slate 
12:40.0. 



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THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1972 



Uni varsity of Massachusetts — The Crltr — Page Five 





Frenzied cRAUd« goes wild at concert, (above) 
Leo Kottle in concert, (Right) 
Bill Saines (Left) 

(photos by Steve Schmidt) 




Demers Presents 



Bud Demers, Overseer of 
Recognized Student Organization 
Accounts formally presented the 
new computerized accounting 
system to all campus area 
Business Managers, audit three 
auditors, Dean of Students William 
F. Field and Acting Vice- 
Chancellor Robert Gage yesterday 
morning in the Campus Center. 

The new system will handle the 
560 different student organization 
accounts, which represents an 
annual cash flow of 2-2-1/2 million 
dollars Demers pointed out. 

He went on to say that students 
treasurers will now be able to 
receive analyses of their accounts 
on a bi-weekly rather than a 
monthly basis. 




George Cusson, consultant for 
RSO and an Assistant Professor at 
Springfield Technical Community 
College, explained to the group 
that several bugs in the system still 
need to be worked out. He at- 
tributed part of this to the scat- 
tering of the Data Processing 
equipment in several areas. 

Egypt & Lybia Merge 

BEIRUT - Egypt and Libya 
today declared they intended to 
form one unified state and set up a 
"unified political command" to 
carry out the merger by Sept. 1, 
1973. 

President Anwar Sadat and the 
Libyan leader, Col. Muammar 
Kadafi, have been discussing the 
merger in Libya since Monday. 
Kadafi first suggested the merger 
last February. 

The Middle East News Agency in 
Cairo said Sadat and Kadafi 
telephoned President Hafez Assad 
of Syria to give him details of the 
agreement. 

Lybia, Egypt and Syria are 
members of the Federation of Arab 
Republics established the first of 
this year. How the merger will 
affect the federation is not clear. 



Stadnicki Appointed Press 

Assistant 



Northfield Mount Hermon School 
announces the appointment of 
Anne Stadnicki to the post of 
Assistant Director of Public In- 
formation at the school, effective 
immediately. 

In this capacity, Ms. Stadnicki 
will direct the News Bureau, and 
be responsible for releases, sports 
coverage, enrollment and other 
news of interest to the outside 
community. She will also serve as 
assistant editor of the monthly 
Bulletin at the school. The editor 
and Director of Public Information 
is John Ravage. 

In addition Ms. Stadnicki will 
assist with photography and aid in 
ihe preparation of the several 
publications of the school, in- 
cluding the Northfield Mount 
Hermon Catalog, Summer School 
Catalog and the Handbook. 

A native of Chicopee, Mass., Ms. 
Stadnicki is a 1972 graduate of the 
University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst where she majored in 
Journalism and English. At UMass 
she was News Editor of the 
Massachusetts Daily Collegian and 
a contributing editor on the 



yearbook and the humor 
magazine. She was active in the 
Amherst Voter Registration 
Coalition and in dormitory 
government, also. 

Ms. Stadnicki is a member of the 
Alpha Phi Gamma national 
honorary journalism fraternity. In 
1972 she was named to Who's Who 
Among Students in American 
Colleges and Universities. 

Recently Ms. Stadnicki wrote an 
orientation article for college 



freshmen in Amherst in a Nutshell, 
a magazine to be released in the 
fall. While in college she worked as 
a correspondent for the Boston 
Herald Traveler and the Amherst 
Record. 

The Northfield Mount Hermon 
School is the largest co-ed boarding 
school in the United States. It is 
located in E. NorthfieM near the 
Vermont and New Hampshire 
boarders. Enrollment is ap- 
proximately 1100 students. 



Conte Made Chairman 

PITTSFIELD, Mass. - Rep. Silvio O. Conte, R— Mass., will serve as 
chairman of one of the seven subcommittees of the Republican Party 
Platform Committee at the national convention in Miami Beach this 
month. 

The Pittsfield lawmaker, serving on his fourth platform committee 
dating back to the 1960 convention, will chair the subcommittee on 
"Building a Greater Prosperity." The panel will hold hearings and draft 
proposals dealing with jobs, inflation, taxation, federal expenditures, 
economic growth and labor and management. 

"Our task will be to recommend progressive resolutions for stabilizing 
our economy," Conte said today. "We intend to deal forthrightly with 
every factor that has a bearing on our national prosperity and the 
prosperity of every individual citizen." 

He said hearings will begin Aug. 14 and the completed platform is 
expected to be presented to the full convention on the 22nd. 



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Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1f72 



Contemporary Festival At Tanglewood 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1»™ 



University of Massachusetts — The Crier • Pago Seven 



TANGLEWOOD, The 1972 

Festival of Contemporary Music at 
Tanglewood takes place this year 
from August 4 through 10. The 
Festival, celebrating the 20th 
Anniversary of the Fromm Music 
Foundation, is sponsored by the 
Berkshire Music Center (the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra's 
summer academy for the ad- 
vanced study of music) in co- 
operation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation of Chicago. 

Often called a "Festival-within- 
a-Festival ", the concerts turn 
Tanglewood into the contemporary 
music capital of the world during 
its intensive and exciting annual 
presentation of new and 
challenging works, some com- 
missioned especially for the 
Festival, many heard in premiere 
performances. This season, the 
Festival of Contemporary Music 
will expand its program, and will 
include, among other highlights, a 
concert by the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. 

The Festival of Contemporary 
Music opens this year at the 
beginning of the sixth weekend of 
Berkshire Festival concerts by the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Friday evening, August 4 at 7:00 
p.m. with a special Weekend 
Prelude concert devoted to the 



music of Aaron Copland, Chairman 
Emeritus of the Faculty of the 
Berkshire Music Center. Music to 
be performed is Twelve Poems of 
Emily Dickinson, with soprano 
soloist Phyllis Curtin (one of the 
1972 Tanglewood Granrud Artists- 
in-Residence), and Mr. Copland as 
pianist; Piano variations with 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Associate Conductor Michael 
Tilson Thomas as pianist; and 
Vitebsk, study on a Jewish theme 
performed by Boston Symphony 
Chamber Players Joseph 
Silverstein, violin, and Jules 
Eskin, cello, with Aaron Copland 
as pianist. 

The 9:00 p.m. Boston Symphony 
Orchestra concert Friday evening, 
August 4 in the Shed is conducted 
by the Orchestra's Associate 
Conductor, Michael Tilson 
Thomas, with soloists soprano 
Phyllis Curtin, and violinist Paul 
Zukofsky. The concert opens with 
Carl Ruggles' Evocations for or- 
chestra (performed in memory of 
the composer), followed by the 
orchestral version of the Poems of 
Emily Dickinson by Aaron 
Copland, with soprano soloist 
Phyllis Curtin. 

Paul Zukofsky next performs the 
world premiere of Charles 
Wuorinen's Concerto for amplified 



violin and orchestra. The concerto 
was commissioned by the Fromm 
Music Foundation. The evening's 
concert concludes with Mr. 
Thomas conducting a performance 
of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, 
also played in memory of the 
comDoser. 

The Festival of Contemporary 
Music continues through August 10 
with a wide range of performances 
by Berkshire Music Center 
students, including vocal and 
chamber music programs, a 
Berkshire Music Center Orchestra 
concert, and performances by the 
Center's Music Theatre Project. 
There will also be a concert by 
Collage, the contemporary music 
ensemble of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. 

Saturday, August 5, the Festival 
presents a Berkshire Music Center 
Vocal Music Recital at 2:30 p.m. in 
the Theatre-Concert Hall. The 
program includes Druckman's 
Dark Upon the Harp, Kim's 
Letters Found Near a Suicide, 
Powell's Haiku Settings, and 
Carter's Robert Frost Songs. 

Sunday evening, August 6 at 8:30 
p.m. in the West Barn, the 
Berkshire Music Center Music 
Theatre Project presents the world 
premiere of Robert Selig's 
Chocorua, commissioned by the 



Chocorua, Yes Man Monday At Tanglewood 



Berkshire Music Center in co- 
operation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation. Also to be performed 
on the same program is Brecht- 
Weill's The Yes Man. (See ad- 
joining story). 

Monday evening, August 7 at 
8:30 p.m. in the Theatre-Concert 
Hall, Collage, the contemporary 
music ensemble of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, presents a 
concert that includes Foss' Time 
Cycle (chamber version), Druck- 
man's Valentine, Crumb's 
Madrigals, Books I and II, Pusz- 
tai's Nocturnes, and Davidovsky's 
Synchronisms no. 2. 

The special Berkshire Music 
Center Chamber Ensemble con- 
cert honoring the 20th Anniversary 
of the Fromm Music Foundation, 
takes place Tuesday evening, 
August 8 at 8:30 p.m. in the 
Theatre-Concert Hall. Under the 
direction of conductors Bruno 
Maderna and Gunther Schuller 
( Artistic Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center), the ensemble 
performs Berio's Circles, Carter's 
Double concerto, Schuller's Tre 
Invenzione (a world premiere 
performance commissioned by the 
Fromm Music Foundation in honor 
of its 20th Anniversary), and 
Maderna's Giardino Reliqioso, 
also a world premiere per- 



formance commissioned by the 
Fromm Music Foundation 
honoring its 20th Anniversary. 

Wednesday evening, August 9 at 
8:30 p.m. in the Theatre-Concert 
Hall, the Berkshire Music Center 
Chamber Music concert scheduled 
includes Imbrie's To A Traveler, 
Kim's rattling on. . ., Mather's 
Cantata II, and Erb's Brass 
quintet. 

The final event of the 1972 
Festival of Contemporary Music is 
a Berkshire Music Center Or- 
chestra concert conducted by 
Bruno Maderna. Thursday 
evening, August 10 at 8:30 p.m. in 
the Theatre-Concert Hall. Mr. 
Maderna conducts the Orchestra in 
Webern's Variations for Or- 
chestra, Op. 30, Shinohara's Piece 
for orchestra, the world premiere 
of Fred Lerdahl's Chromorhyth- 
mos (commissioned by the 
Berkshire Music Center in co- 
operation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation), and, to conclude the 
concert, Druckman's Windows. 

All concerts are events of the 
Friends of Music at Tnaglewood, 
requiring a $1.50 donation per 
concert or Friends membership 
card. The opening Festival concert 
on August 4 is a regular Berkshire 
Festival concert for which 
Berkshire Festival tickets are 
required. 



The Music Theatre Project at Tanglewood, part of 
the Berkshire Music Center (the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra's summer academy for the advanced 
study of music), opens it's 1972 season August 2 at 
8:30 p.m. in the West Barn. 2 other performances will 
also be given August 3 and 6, also at 8:30 p.m. in the 
West Barn. The performances include the world 
premiere of Robert Selig's Chocorua (commissioned 
jointly by the Berkshire Music Center and the Fromm 
Music Foundation ), and Brecht-Weill's The Yes Man. 

Robert Selig's Chocorua is based on a scenario by 
Leo Bonfanti with text by the Boston poet Richard 
Moore. The story is derived from actual events of the 
eighteenth century and tells of indian chief Chocorua 
who remains behind in New Hampshire when his 
tribe emigrates northward, and mingles with the 
English settlers with tragic results. 

Ian Strasfogel, newly appointed General Director 
of the Opera Society of Washington, D.C., and head of 
the Music Theatre Project, describes Chocorua's 
style as "conceived as a memory piece using short, 
almost cinematic flashbacks." Chocorua will be 
conducted by John Miner, a Berkshire Music Center 
Conducting Fellow. 

The cast includes Timothy Nolen as Chocorua, 
William Neill as Hobbomko, Jim Hooper as Leverett, 
Barbara Hocher as Leverett's wive Abagail, Willard 
White as the old chieftan, Ariel Bybee as a 
tribeswoman, and Raphael Sbarge as the chief's son. 
It is interesting to note that Timothy Nolen's great 



uncle was Chief Red Cloud of the Sioux Indians, who 
fought and defeated Custer at Custer's Last Stand at 
Little Big Horn. 

The Yes Man, a translation by J. M. Potts of the 
1930 Brecht-Weill Lehrstuck (or "instructional piece" 
Der Jasager) will be presented in conjunction with 
the Boston University Choral Institute at the 
Berkshire Music Center. The Yes Man was written 
just before the collapse of the Wiemar Republic. Mr. 
Strasfogel describes The Yes Man as Brecht's 
warning against the blind following of orders. 

The Yes Man will be conducted by Berkshire Music 
Center conducting fellow John Neshling. The cast of 
this rarely performed piece includes: Jim Hooper 
(August 3), and Lenis Carlson (August 2 and 6) as the 
teacher, Doug Ahlstedt as the boy, Ariel Bybee as the 
mother, and Willard White, Roelof Oostwoud, and 
William Neill as the three boys. 

Musical preparation was done by Music Theatre 
Project Head Coach and newly appointed Chairman 
of the Opera Department of the New England Con- 
servatory Martin Smith, and his assistants Paulette 
Haupt Nolen, and Dixie Neill. 

Performances of Chocorua and The Yes Man are 
scheduled for August 2, 3, and 6 at 8:30 p.m. in 
Tanglewood *s West Barn. Reservations are required 
and may be made at the Friends Office at 
Tanglewood, area code 413, 637-1600, ext. 276. Ad- 
mission prices are $1.00 for Friends and $2.50 for non- 
Friends. 



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i — - — * 1 .... - i i ■ i i ■ — — . — ii *. I .1, — . — ,i _ — — _ ^^__ ___^_ ■ 



Please insert one character, space, or punctuation mark per box. 



1964 Chevrolet Impala Con- 
vertible, good condition, contact 
Larry at 549-6676 or leave 
message at Crier office. 

1971 Ford Torino Squire Station 
Wagon V-8, power brakes, 
power steering, gray gold — 
3,000 miles. Best Offer. Call 
253-5641. 

8/15 

1970 Kawasaki Bighorn 350cc, 
great bike for street or trail. 
Very good condition, must sell 
immediately. Call 549-6820. 

8/3 

INi VW Bug. Recently 
overhauled engine. In top 
mechanical condition. 549-6083. 
8/B 

Austin Healey 3000 1962 — good 
cond. Elec. over drive 
Mich el ins $1,000. Call Don at 
584-8597 between 12 & 4. 
8/3,5 

1970 Honda CL 350, 10,000 miles, 
brand new engine. $550. Call 665- 
3129. 

8/15 

Mimaya/Sekor 500 DTL W/S50 
in accessories — $125. Also 2 
guitar AMP speakers — $30 pr 
256-6633. 

8/15 

Kowa Six 2-1/4 x 2-1/4 85 mm 

with hand grip $195.00. Excel. 

cond. "Poor Man's 

Hasselblad". Call 665 3602 after 

5:00. 

8/1,8/8 

22" Black & White TV $45., 21" 
Color TV $150. TELEVISION 
CENTER, 55 North Pleasant St. 
Amherst, 2nd Floor, f 253-51 00. 
8/15 

FERSONAL 

FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207 T. 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

8/lS 

Male seeks 2 Bi F's, 25-plus for 
enduring menage a frois 
oriented to esthetics and 
eroticism, actively creative. 
Stable yet able to partake of the 
delghts. P.O. Box 123, Amherst. 

8/15 



HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS — 
Participate in experiment at 
UMass. Earn $4 for 2 hours 
work. Call Rebecca Warren 
between 4 & 7 p.m. at 256 6456. 
8/8 

Earn $5.00 in approximately 30 
min. Couples only, one must 
have full-time job. Call 549-3931 
after 5 p.m. Also bed spring, cl. 
dryer. 

8/3 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

Female roommate wanted 
beginning Sept. 1 for full year at 
Puffton Village. Call 549-0385 
after 6 p.m. on weekdays. 

8/15 

Female roommate wanted — 
Sept. 1. 2 bedroom apt. Brittany 
Manor. Furniture provided 
(except your own bedroom). 
$110. Call 549-0711: 

8/8_ 

FOR RENT 

EFF. AND 2 1/2 rm. aptS. turn., 
all utils., parking, pool, 9 mo. 
lease avail, from Sept. 1. Reas. 
rent Amherst Motel opp. 
Zayre's. 
8/15 

Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, S185/M incl utilities. Call 
Resident Mgr 665-4239, if no 
answer 1-786-0500. 

8/15 

BeafW'ISScW'ffiSHfe by 
request. It's about the 60's. It's 
an emotional experience. Plus 
"The Hat Box Mystery" and 
cartoons. Thurs. Aug. 3, 7:15 & 
9.15, Amherst Folklore Centre. 

Sat. nite Jack Veronesi & 
Friends play at the Folklore Ctr. 
Good Music. Fri nite Is Phantom 
of the Opera, 8:30 p.m., $1. 

8/3 

Pendrift is playing at 
Quicksilver Friday and 
Saturday evenings from 9-1 and 
at the Riverview on Sunday 
from 9-1. 

P/3 

NOTICES 



Driver Needed — to Miami 
Beach in the middle of August. 
Call 5491532 after 5 p.m. 

1 8/lfi 

AVOID an automotive RIP- 
OFF. No charge for estimates 
on repairs. All work guaranteed, 
at Spencer's Mobil 161 N. 
Pleasant St. (next to P.O.) 253- 
9050. 



GAYS, wishing to meet others, 
come to 911 CCtonite (Thurs.) at 
7:30 or call Student Homophile 
League 5-0154. 

8/20 



You are most welcomed to come 
every Tuesday at 7 p.m. for an 
informal gathering of The 
Christian Science College 
Organization. Hear how Truth 
and Love unfold good for all. 
Campus Center 809. 
8/15 



Grant Will Aid Minority Business Students 



WASHINGTON, D.C.— A $175,000 
federal grant will enable UMass to 
share its experience in training 
minority business administration 
students with four other schools. 

News of the grant was made 
available by the office of U.S. Rep. 
Silvio O. Conte, who said, "The 
University of Massachusetts has 
now been recognized as a national 
leader in the long overdue effort to 



promote minority business 
development." 

Conte's comment followed an- 
nouncement of the $175,000 grant to 
the university for its program 
ABLE (Accelerated Business 
Leadership Education). 

"The most exciting aspect of this 
good news," Conte said, "is that 
the experience of the university in 
training minority business 



Security Deposit Ratio 
Stabilized Under Controls 



Security deposits may not be 
adjusted above the ratio of that the 
security deposits bore to rent on 
August 15, 1971 according to a 
federal regulation 30.1.4 (a) (b), 
announced July 5 1972, according 
to Richard Howland, Student 



Senate Lawyer. In other words, if 
rent may lawfully be raised, one 
month's security deposits may be 
increased the same amount, but it 
may not be changed to a two 
month's rent deposit. 



students for the past three years 
will now be shared by four other 
universities: Atlanta, N.Y.U., 
Syracuse, and Howard University. 

"Under the leadership of 
Executive Director Larry Johnson, 
some 30 minority students have 
already earned degrees of masters 
in business administration at 
UMass." 

"In addition to their course 
work, the students have given their 
time to assist minority 
businessmen in the Springfield- 
Holyoke area. 

"Based on that experience the 
university has now formed a 
consortium with these four other 
universities to multiply the impact 
of their experiences. 

"In making this award Com- 
merce Department officials have 
indicated their intention to use 



program ABLE as a national 
model." 

Conte, who is senior Republican 
on the House Small Business 
Committee, and serves on its 
Minority Business Subcommittee, 
strongly supported the ABLE 
application. 

"I have long been committed," 
Conte said, "to doing all I can to 



correct the tragic imbalance under 
which 18 per cent of our population 
who are in minorities own less than 
1 per cent of our business assets. 

"Central to that objective is the 
need to assure an adequate supply 
of top level minority managers and 
administrators to assist in the 
leadership of minority business 
development." 



Inside Astrology 



ROBERT 



By Madeleine Monnet 
STELLAR PROFILE 
MITCHUM 

The man, the actor, the producer, the 
swinger, Robert Mitchum is a lot of Leo. 
One of our most enduring talents, born 
Aug. 6, he is among the Kings of the show- 
biz jungle. 

R.AA.'s rocky road through life In "this 
best of all possible worlds" has, at times, 
strongly resembled a part from Voltaire's 
"Candide." Mars at the moment of his 
birth promised early and continuous 
upheavels. One of the many rare facts 
about this totally individualistic guy Is 
that he was dubbed Robert (Charles 
Ouran) Mitchum at birth. The handle Is 
his own. 

At the tender age of 11, Mitchum relates 
the buffetlngs he took out on the road 
alone: "I washed dishes and hauled slop 
and, when I got to California, I just rolled 
the drunks." Not the greatest proving 
grounds for earning good citizenship 
marks. Some 20 years later, en route to 
stardom. Bob was indicted for narcotic 
smoking. 

Mitchum took his knocks with the 
courage typical of the Lion. He added the 
salty bit of Moon in Aires in serious 
conflict with Mars and Pluto. This is the 
trigger trap In Mitchum's horoscope and 
to an astrologer explains most of the 
kinks. In many ways he has a beautiful 
chart but some of the rough spots could 
easily trip up a youthful, unwary and 
' unprotected Bob. 

No question he is a highly colorful 
member of the human race. Here's what I 
mean by a salty moon-mars personality. 
When asked his profession by the sen- 
tencing judge, R.M. replied, "former 
actor." When released, a friendly 
reporter asked: "How was it, Mitch?" 
"Just iik< Palm Springs," Mitch replied 
"without he riffraff." 

Thestr lg side of Mars gives courage. 
Robert M. Justed himself off and went on 
to become one of the world's favorites. 
Bob Is the eternal optimist, nothing and 
no one can hold this cat down for long and 
that includes the opposite sex. Mitchum's 
nativity suggests he would relentlessly 
dominate hjs home Having accepted this 
mandate, his partner would enjoy a royal 
love feast and be handsomely provided 
for. 

Deeply complex to the point of con- 
tradictions, Bob often associates with 
those not acceptable to establishment- 
type family and friends. Temper, tem- 
perament and strong self assert I veness 
are all part of Mitchum's picture; wild 
facets of his nature which can be tamed. 
Assisted by some beautiful planet 
bonuses to work with, he has indeed 
"overcome." 

All Leos like respect and admiration. 
Sooner or later the Lion's need to have his 
ego scratched causes him to subdue the 
rampant side of his nature. 

The power and talent of this complex 
gentleman we have all been enjoying for 
many moons. Mitchum's dedication to his 
craft, today, pays off with tender words 
from the critics. Endowed with explosive 
energy, he has formed the habit of 
overcompensating through hard 
Mitch is consistently superior In 

forts. 

R.M. shows superlative talent with 
words and lust might at some time Im- 
press his public with literary efforts. 

in a lucky cycle for the next five years, 
he can pick up top winnings in 73 and '74. 
More generous than wise. Bob should be 
on the alert for false friends who can 
prove costly. 

STAR TRENDS: The general outlook 
from Pompey's Head Is pleasing. I could 
string a lot of lulcy adjectives to describe 
this week's planet pattern such as: 
creative, enthusiastic, enduring and even 
romantic. With just one exception. It's 
dandy. That exception says: "Don't 
entirely trust your heart or your money 
lender." 

ARIES: (Mar 21 Apr 4) Listen closely 
to your inner prompting and if in doubt, 
skip the love scene. (Apr 5 19) This is that 
very special time you've wished for when 
supersoaring Is at your fingertips. 

TAURUS: (Apr 20 May $) A lucky 

trend launched in May comes full circle 

with smiling hours of pleasure and 

fulfillment. (May 6 20> Ease up on the gas 

I pedal and take emotional curves slowly 

I enri safely. 



work, 
all ef- 



GEMINI: (May 21-Jun 6) Splena.a 
vibes, old dear, get in the swing and fudge 
for an advantage.. (Jun 7-21) Utilize all 
power towards "happenings" that en- 
dure, but do it on a budget. 

CANCER: (Jun 27-Jul 7) Tender 
moments with one you idolize give 
memories to treasure, but double-bolt the 
door on possessions. (July S-22) Tune In 
on creative currents now abounding and 
translate ideas Into deeds. 

LEO: (July 23 Aug 7) You have the 
magic touch to turn your whole world 
golden; magnify communications. (Aug 
8-22) This can be your year to remember 
as your Hall-of-Fame peak time. Within 
the scope of your range of influence, you 
can be the shining light of inspiration. 

VIRGO: (Aug 23 Sept 7) Special 
pleasure centering around your home 
gives you untold ioy; live it up. (Sept. 8- 
22) Responsibilities may seem a bit 
unrelenting, but these are the kind of 
challenges you meet better than anyone. 

LIBRA: (Sept 230ct 7) Careful lest 
little misunderstandings creep in and 
spoil your scene; don't get petty. (Oct 8- 
22) Swing from the apple tree if you must, 
but remember the old fable and think 
over temptation. 



SCORPIO: (Oct 23-Nov 7) That one 
enchanted evening is your very own. If 
you've a heart "vacancy" look around. 
(Nov 8-21) Maintain an extremely low 
profile with the world in general and 
you'll enjoy brighter tomorrows. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov 22 Dec 7) Make 
"beauty" in all its many delightful forms 
your daily dedication. (Dec 6 21) You can 
indeed be swinging on a star, but watch 
the altitude indicator. If frost collects, 
your wings are clipped. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec 22 Jan S) Tender 
loving care with those who count will ease 
you over minor upsets. (Jan 6-19) The 
book-bottle-shady-nook scene has It all 
over any world-moving feast; retreat. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan 20 Feb 3) Easy days 
in the sun renew your strength and feed 
your soul. Paint a picture, play a tune, 
relax. (Feb 4-18) You're magnetic with 
appeal, but mistake prone, so use gentle 
caution. 

PISCES: (Feb 19 Mar 7) If you would 
win a bow, get a raise, create a sensation. 
Make your play now! (Mar 8 20) Your 
judgement may be just a mite out of 
adjustment; cool it. 

(Copyright, 1972, by United Feature 
Syndicate, Inc.) 20SD7720 



Crossword Puzzle 



ACROSS 

1 Courageous 

person 
5 Shut up 
9 Ordinance 

12 Declare 

13 Region 

14 Suffix: 
adherent of 

15 Chart 

16 Great Lake 

17 Emmets 

18 Pertaining to 
a court 

20 Wideawake. 

21 Quiets 

23 Majcaw 

24 Guff-like birds 

25 One opposed 

26 'Symbol for 
cerium 

28 Genus of olives 

29 Transgresses 

30 Possessive 
pronoun 

3\ .Communist 

32 Citrus 
fruit • 

33 Solar disk 

34 For example 
(abbr.) 

35 Places 

36 Open space in 
forest 

37 Speed contests 
39 Trade for money 
410 Strong winds 

41 Male sheep 

42 Anger 

45 Preposition 

46 Crony (collqp.) 

47 Mrfrk left by 
wound 

48 Old pronoun 

49 Likely 

50 The caama 

DOWN 

1 Cut of meat 

2 Girl's name 

3 Mended 



10 
11 
16 

17 

19 
20 

21 

22 
23 
25 
27 
29 



Conjunction 

European 

capital 

Man's name 

Born 

Symbol for 

tantalum 

Sea -going 

vessel 

Enticed 

Direction 

Cloth 

measure (pi.) 

Turkish 

regiment 

Arm bone 

Academic 

subjects 

Retail 

establishment 

Signal device 

Girl's name 

Goals 

Slave 

Poses for 

portrait 



Answer to Last Issue's Puzzle 



onr-: ltirrr Gran 

I3DL CL^L! BnnE 



I N C I LI 



ODDI^ EDkE 

ide ennre unnra 

QBE BLDii EERHri 

ed ni:n per an 

□BGinra raran per 

HEWR REii RE 

EOER EBI71E BEE 
GERE RBSD ERR 



30 



Style of 40 

printing 

Dregs 41 

Everyone 43 

Part of play 44 

Precious stone 46 

38 Century 

plant 47 

39 Seasoning 



32 
33 
35 
36 



Plunder of 

contents 

Knock 

Ethiopian title 

Before 

Parent 

(colloq.) 

A continent 

(abbr.) 




Distr. by United Feature Syndicate, Inc. 




i. — »■ at. 



•■'* '■' • ~ ' •■•'■*• • ■ i *l T • 



Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — The Critr 



August 4 

TANGLEWOOD — Fromm Special 
Concert 

7 p.m. Weekend Prelude - Phyllis 
Curtin, Aaron Copland, Michael 
Tilson Thomas, Joseph Silverstein, 
Jules Eskin. 

9 p.m. Michael Tilson Thomas - 
Ruggles: Evocations for Orchestra; 
Copland: 8 Poems of Emily 
Dickinson: Phyllis Curtin; 

Wuorinen: Violin Concerto: Paul 
Zukofsky; Stravinsky: Rite of 
Spring. 
August 5 

TANGLEWOOD 

10:30 a.m. Open Rehearsal 
8:30 p.m. Aldo Ceccato • Men- 
delssohn: Symphony No. 1; 
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3; 
John Browning - Dvorak: "New 
World" Symphony. 
August 6 

TANGLEWOOD 

2:30 Michael Tilson Thomas 

Haydn: Oboe Concerto; Ralph 

Gomberg - Mahler: Symphony No. 5. 

THEATER 

"Love, Marriage, etc." by Feiffer, 
South College July 27-August 9. 
Curtain time 8:30. Call 545-2579. 

CONNECTICUT 
East Haddam Goodspeed Opera 
House. Tomorrow-Sat., Sunny with 
Leland Palmer. 



Highlights 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1972 



Farmington Triangle Playhouse. 
Tomorrow-Sat., The Gazebo. 
Ivoryton-Playhouse. Tomorrow-Sat., 
The Last of the Red Hot Lovers with 
Sid Caesar. 

New Fairfield Candlewood ''"heater. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Do I Hear a Waltz? 
with Patrice Munsel. 
Sharon-Playhouse. Tues.-Sat., End of 
Summer. 

Southbury Playhouse Tues.-Sat., 
Fiddler on the Roof. 
Storrs Nutmeg Summer Playhouse. 
Tues.-Sat., Cabaret. 
Stratford The American 
Shakespeare Festival. Today, 
Thurs., Sat. mats., Tues. eve., Julius 
Caesar; Wed., Fri. eves., Major 
Barbara; Thurs., Sat. eves., Wed. 
mat., Antony and Cleopatra. 
Wallingford-Oakdale Music Theater. 
Today, Sandler and Young with Pat 
Cooper; Tues-Sat., Jesus Christ 
Superstar. 

westport Country Playhouse. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Jacques Brel with 
Jean Pierre Aumont. 

RHODE ISLAND 
Little Compton Carriage House 
Theater. Today, Tues.-Sat., The Boys 
in the Band. 



Matunuck Theater by the Sea. 
Today, Tues.-Sat., The Sound of 
Music. 

Providence-Brown University 
Summer Theater in Faunce House 
Arena Theater. Today, Dial M for 
Murder; Wed. -Sat., The Star- 
Spangled Girl. 

Warwick-Musical Theater. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Jerry Vale and The 
Golddiggers. 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Beverly- North Shore Music Circus. 
Tomorrow-Sat., The King and I with 
Betsy Palmer. 

Cambridge-Harvard Summer School 
Repertory Theater, Loeb Center. 
Tomorrow, Wed., Sat., Heartbreak 
House; Thurs., A Moon for the 
Misbegotten; Tues., Fri., The Match- 
maker. 

The Proposition. Wed. -Sat., an 
improvised revue with music. 
Chatham -Monomoy Theater. Wed. 
Sat., Tartuffe. 

Cohasset-South Shore Music Circus. 
Today, Sergio Franchi and Norm 
Crosby; tomorrow-Sat., Fiddler on 
the Roof with Jan Peerce. 
Dennis-Cape Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
sat., Remember Ma! 



Easthampton Williston Summer 
Theatre. Wed. at 10:30 a.m., Fri., 
Sat. at 2 p.m., The Emperor's New 
Clothes; Wed., Fri., The Prime of 
Miss Jean Brodie; Thurs., Sat., 
Rhinoceros. 

Falmouth Playhouse. Tomorrow- 
Sat., The Gingerbread Lady with 
Tammy Grimes. 

Highfield Theater. Tues.-Sat., 
Utopia Limited. 

Fitchburg High Tor Summer 
Theater. Tues.-Sat., Milk and Honey. 
Framingham Chateau de Ville 
Dinner Theater. Today, Tues.-Sat., 
Carousel with John Raitt. 
Hyannis Cape Cod Melody Tent. 
Today, The Mahavishnus Orchestra ; 
Tues.-Sat., Hair. 

Lenox-Arts Center. Today, Andre 
Gregory's Company presents 
Beckett's Endgame in open 
rehearsals. Wed. -Sat., Dr. Selavy's 
Magic Theater (composed by Stanley 
Silverman, conceived and staged by 
Richard Foreman). The Poetry 
Series: Today at 5:30, Doris Dana. 
Medford Tufts Summer Theater. 
Wed. -Sat., Love for Love. 
Nantucket Theater Workshop. 
Tomorrow-Sat., Riverwind. 



Guarantees-Part I 



North Eastham The Fisherman's 
Players. Tomorrow, Tues., The 
Savior and The Resurrection of J. 
Thadeus Sloan; Wed., Thurs., The 
Clown and Sarah and the Sax; Fri., 
Sat., Color Me Human. 
Orleans-Arena Theater. Tomorrow- 
Sat., Celebration. 
Provincetown Playhouse on 
theWharf. Today, A Long Day's 
Journey into Night; Tues.-Sat., 
Anatol (new) with music by Nancy 
Ford and lyrics by Tom Jones. 
South Hadley Mount Holyoke College 
Summer Theater. Tues.-Sat., Luv. 
Stockbridge Berkshire Theater 
Festival. Tues.-Sat., Clark and 
Myrna with Vivian Vance and 
George S. Irving. 
Sturbridge- Ring-A- Round 
Playhouse. Today, The Fourposter; 
Tues.-Sat., Tiger at the Gate. 
West Springfield Storrowton Musical 
Theater. Tomorrow-Sat., Mama. 
Williamstown Theater. Tues.-Sat., 
Uncle Vanya with Marcia Tucci. 
Worcester -Foothills Theater Com- 
pany, Atwood Hall at Clark 
University. Tues.-Sat., Lovers and 
Other Strangers. 

VERMONT 
Bradford- Repertory Theater. Tues., 
You Know I Can't Hear You When the 
Water's Running; Wed., Night Must 
Fall; Thurs., Fri., Sat., Oliver. 



by Attorney General, 
Robert H. Quinn 

In an age when everything from 
sporting goods to computers 
carries with it a "guarantee", 
"warranty", or some promise of 
satisfaction to the buyer, it is 
essential that the consumer 
acquaint himself with the 
provisions for a reputable 
guarantee. 



The major difficulty with the 
advertising of guarantees has been 
the failure to state adequately 
what the guarantee is. Consumers 
often take for granted that 
replacement, repair or cash refund 
is unconditional when a product is 
•guaranteed". What they fail to 
realize is that before the consumer 
can consider his guarantee to be an 
assurance of performance rather 
than a deceptively ambiguous 
selling point, it must meet certain 
requirements under 
Massachusetts as well as Federal 
law. 



TheTbl lowing guidelines apply to 
"guarantees", "warranties", or 
any promise of representation in 



the nature of a "guarantee" or 
"warranty". These provisions 
should be clearly and con- 
spicuously disclosed : 

1. Nature and extent of 
guarantee- This should make clear 
what product or part of the product 
is guaranteed and what specific 
characteristics or properties are 
covered by the guarantee. 



The duration of the guarantee 
should be clearly specified as well 
as anything the purchaser must do 
before claiming the guarantee. 
This proved to be a point of con- 
fusion when one consumer tried to 
get his toaster repaired and 
learned that he had not only to 
return it to the factory located 1500 
miles away, but that he was also 



out. So while the replacement of all 
watches may be guaranteed by one 
watch company, another watch 
manufacturer has the additional 
option of replacing only the 
defective part. 

3. Identity of guarantor- This 
should be clearly revealed in all 
advertising as well as in any 
printed material evidencing the 
guarantee. For example, one lawn 
mower is guaranteed for parts 

replacement, but there is confusion 
as to whether it must be returned 
to the factory or the retail outlet. 
This information would be found on 
the guarantee. 



Gimbles Claims 
Innocence 



Gimbels Bros., Inc., has denied 
Federal Trade Commission 
charges that lease agreements 
with shopping center developers 
are anticompetitive. 

In responding to an FTC com- 



b) Deter Respondent and other 
large department store companies 
from making the enormous in- 
vestments and long-term financial 
commitments essential to the 



plaint of May 8, 1972, Gimbels, 33rd creation and development of retail 
and Broadway, New York City, i shopping centers; 



asserts that "This proceeding is 
not in the interest of the public, 
since the relief sought in the 
Federal Trade Commission's 
proposed order would. 

a ) Impel Respondent and other 
large department store companies 
to channel future expansion to free- 
standing stores without adjacent 
competitive establishments; 



Cocaine Vs Heroin 



The Voice 
5-2566 



responsible for the labor and 
service charges However, upon 
looking into the matter, my office 
found that those were exactly his 
obligations under the terms of the 
guarantee and could do no more for 
him. 



2. Manner in which guarantor 
will perform- This is a statement of 
exactly what the guarantor will do 
under the guarantee. Examples of 
this would be repair, replacement 
and refund. If the guarantor or the 
person receiving the guarantee has 
an option as to what may satisfy 
the guarantee this should be set 



Faulty 



Income Tax 
Preparation 



The Federal Trade Commission 
provisionally accepted a consent 
order prohibiting GAC Finance, 
Inc., and its subsidiary, GAC Tax 
Returns, Inc., from making false 
claims for their personal income 
tax prepration services. Both 
companies are located at 1105 
Hamilton St., Allentown, Pa., and 
have local offices in several states. 

The complaint alleges that, 
contrary to GAC's advertised 
guarantee, the company does not 
reimburse the taxpayer for all 
payments he is required to make 
as a result of error in the 
preparation of his tax return. 

Further, the complaint alleges 
that GAC misrepresents the 
training and competence of its tax 
preparing personnel, who prepare 
and give advice concerning 
complex and detailed income tax 



the t 



Itirn*. 




i.1 ad 


.i.oii to i'roh .y.Unp 


ib»e, • 


.« ntation* ;.he «. 



order requires GAC: 

* In connection with any 
representations concerning its 
liability for errors, to clearly and 
conspicuously disclose that it will 
not assume such liability for ad- 
ditional taxes assessed against the 
tax payer. 

* Send a letter to the last known 
address of customers for the past 
year, explaining GAC's policy as to 
its responsibility for errors they 
may have made in the preparation 
of tax returns. 

The agreement is for settlement 
purposes only and does not con- 
stitute an admission by the 
respondents that they have 
violated the law. When issued by 
the Commission on a final basis, a 
consent order does carry the force 
of law with respect to future ac- 
tions. A violation of such an order 
may •*. ' In i civil penalty up to 
jr 'l-; s* vk ' •••■'•■ i bong imposed 
upn" me ,-e».»' »*>.,'« its. 



commented, on the subject of pot. 
that the judicial attitude toward 
marijuana possession has now 
gone full circle. He noted that in 
cases involving a misdemeanor 
quantity of marijuana, the District 
Attorney in Manhattan, "without 
any prompting" from the court, 
always moves to adjourn in con- 
templation of dismissal. The 
motion amounts to an automatic 
dismissal after six months if there 
has been no further violation of the 
same nature. 

The New York State Legislature 
has expanded the New York City 
Youth Council Bureau approach 
throughout the State. As former 
Chief Assistant District Attorney of 
New York County Richard H. Kuh 
told the panel, what this legal 
stance means is that throughout 
the State all cases involving small 
amounts of marijuana in effect fall 
within the jurisdiction of probation 
departments. A case may be 
referred to these departments and 
be eligible for dismissal after six 
months if no further infraction is 
on record. 

Asked whether this more relaxed 
policy means that marijuana is 
much less of a problem now than it 
was six months ago. Judge Roth- 
wax commented: "Most judges 
and most prosecutors themselves, 
have friends, if not themselves, 
who are smoking marijuana. 
There is a tolerance of hypocrisy 
which can only go so far." 

Mackell, who would like to see 
the State Legislature reduce the 
possession of marijuana from 
misdemearor to violation status on 
the law books (a position that the 
District Attorneys' Association is 
arguing for the second consecutive 
year), claims that the general 
change in attitude toward 
marijuana has already filtered 
down to the police department, 
where marijuana arrest figures 
are decidedly down. 



Although marijuana 
prosecutions have diminished 
considerably in the New York 
metropolitan area within the past 
six months, cocaine arrests have 
risen sharply during the same span 
of time. This was the conclusion 
reached by a panel of prominent 
attorneys and a judge convened 
this month by the journal Con- 
temporary Drug Problems to 
discuss both the prosecution and 
defense of drug cases. 

Queens District Attorney 
Thomas Mackell, one of the 
panelists, said that unless an ex- 
ceptionally large amount of 
marijuana -"up in the pounds '--is 
involved, current prosecution of 
marijuana cases rarely "goes the 
whole route." 

However, Mackell added, there's 
a higher incidence of cocaine 
arrests. 

New York City attorney Arthur 
Mass, underscoring the growing 
threat of cocaine addiction, 
reminded that cocaine is more 
costly than heroin and just as 
lethal. Mass estimated that a 
spoonful of the drug -equivalent to 
one or two days' supply, com- 
mands a street price ranging from 
$50 to $60. The street value of an 
average bag of heroin runs 
anywhere from $3 to $7. 

New York City may be on the 
verge of a cocaine epidemic. 
Charles Updike, Assistant United 
States Attorney for the Southern 
District of New York, told the 
panel cocaine is already almost as 
prevalent as heroin in New York 
City. Specifically, he said it's 
"about 2/3 the volume of heroin 
traffic in New York City." 

Judge Harold Rothwax of the 
Criminal Court of the City of New 
York, also a panelist, charac- 
terized cocaine as "the drug of the 
rich." But, the judge observed, 
"not so many rich people are 
arrested." 

It was Judge Rothwax who 



c) Impede and limit shopping 
center developers in obtaining the 
financing essential to the creation 
and development of retail shopping 
center; 

d) Deprive local independent 
retailers and national chain store 
organizations of the opportunity to 
compete with Respondent, its 
subsidiaries and other large 
department stores for retail sales 
dollars heretofore generated by 
retail shopping centers; 

e) Deprive consumers of the 
convenience, economy and 
benefits of competition to be 
derived from retail shopping 
centers ; 

f) Destroy the investments of 
both large and small tenants in 
existing retail shopping centers, 
which were made in reliance on the 
expected success of a venture 
based on a broad mix of competing 
tenants, creating and catering to 
consumers who are homogeneous - 
at least at any given point in time - 
with respect to their shopping 
patterns, needs, desires and ex- 
pectations; 

g) As a consequence of the 
foregoing, restrict, restrain, lessen 
and prevent competition in the 
retail distribution of goods and 
services in trading areas across 
the country, rather than enhance, 
improve and encourage such 
competition." 

Gimbels also contends that "This 
proceeding is not in the interest of 
the public, since the lease 
provisions referred to in the 
complaint are, in the light of all the 
facts and circumstances 
surrounding and involved in the 
execution of the lease agreements 
between Respondent and shopping 
center developers referred to in the 
complaint, fair and reasonable and 
therefore legal." 

Senate aids 
Runaway, Crime 

WASHINGTON, July 31 
(UPD— The Senate by voice vote 
approved bills today to help state 
and private agencies prevent 
juvenile deliquency and to create a 
national network of shelters for 
runaway children. 

The delinquency bill would 
authorize appropriations of $75 
million through June, 1974, for 
youth services. 

The other bill would authorize 
$10 million a year for three years 
to help build, renovate and staff 
shelters for runaways. 



Portable Circus, Comedy, 
To Parody Television 

,™_ o ™ i-. -ii -li ~-~.«..* t*,« vacation. This experience confirmed his initial en- 

The Summer Program Council will present The ^.^3^ 

Portable Circus in the Campus Center Auditorium « £J' t|me ^ group first ap p roached hi m> 

tomorrow at 8 p.m. . Sherman was already at work independently 

In^style reminiscent of ^ignJheaU-ejr_Uie deve i oping a theatrical project meant to explore the 

" ' ' ^ meaning and effects of TV on our contemporary 



Ace Trucking Company, Portable Circus mixes light 
comedy with biting satire, concentrating on social 
and cultural issues. 

Founded in 1969 at Trinity College in Hartford, 
Connecticut, as an undergraduate improvisational 
comedy group, the Circus is a group of five per- 
formers who through a series of lively comedy 
sketches examines the effects t?levision, the 
universal medium, has on all of us. 

In February, 1971, having appeared successfully at 
several colleges in the East, the group decided to 
pursue comedy as a career. They sought the 
professional advice of George Sherman, writer and 
theater director, who had taught at Trinity. Their 
talent, vitality and unusual imagination excited 



society. Sherman proposed that they develop a concert 
with TV as the major theme. The group, members of 
the first generation "raised" on television, responded 
immediately and enthusiastically. 

At the close of college on June 1, 1971, they came to 
New York; they rehearsed for two days, developing a 
half-hour show for public audition at the Main Point 
in Philadelphia. On June 3rd, they auditioned and 
scored an instant success. The Philadelphia Evening 
Bulletin wrote: "Funny people in search of a 
future... score it boffo... wildly funny." 

Since the Philadelphia success, they have returned 
to the Main Point, appeared on television, at the 
Bitter End in Greenwich Village, in concert at Long 



Sherman to the extent that he proposed to work with M&nd University during its summer session, and are 
them on an exploratory basis during their spring slated tQ appear Qn £ Dick Cayett Show 




University of Massachusetts 
August 8, 1972 Volume 1. Issue 12 

■ 

"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Patriots Lose First Game 



By KD BRYANT 

A poor start on defense and too 
many penalties caused the New 
England Patriots to lose their first 
exhibition game to the Oakland 
Raiders. 31-24. in a game played 
Saturday night in Oakland. 
Playing good football at times, the 
Patriots nearly pulled the game 
out, but were beaten by a team that 
made fewer mistakes, thus 
avenging a 20-6 loss to the Pats in 
last year's Opening Game. 

Following the opening kickoff. 
the Patriots managed a single first 
down before being forced to punt. 
The Raiders quickly marched to a 
touchdown, kicked off again, 
forced the Pats to punt once more, 
and marched to another touch- 
down. The first touchdown was set 
up by the running of Marv Hub- 
bard, and a 20-yard pass from 
Daryle Latnonica to Clarence 
Davis. The second came after 
Raymond Chester took a LaMonica 
pass 39 yards. Don Heismith. a 
substitute running back, scored 
both touchdowns from the two yard 
line. In the two drives, the Raiders 
gained 142 yards on 14 plays, an 
incredible 10.1 yards per play. 

The Pats managed to catch up. 
as they started playing better 
football. Carl Garrett scored from 
the two. at the end of the first 
period, climaxing a fine scoring 
drive engineered by Jim Plunkett. 
Plunkett, who played the first half, 
was not in form, completing only 
three of 12 passes. 

Following an Oakland fumble, 
the Pats scored on a 45 yard field 
goal by Charlie Gogolak. A couple 
of penalties hampered this drive. 

The two teams exchanged the 
ball without scoring until the final 
two minutes of the half. Ed Hideout 
fumbled an Oakland punt, setting 
up a possible Raiders score. The 
defense held, and George Blanda 
came on to attempt a 50-yard field 
goal. It was short, and Rickie 
Harris returned it 90 yards for a 
touchdown, which put the Pats 
ahead 17-14 at halftime 

In the second half. Brian 
Dowling and Ken Stabler replaced 
Plunkett and LaMonica respec- 
tively. Stabler was able to move 
the Raiders largely because of his 
own scrambling. Frequently he 
couldn't find an open receiver, and 
was able to scramble to keep a 
drive going. 



Stabler led the Raiders to a 
touchdown on their first second 
half possession, ending with a 26- 
vard scoring strike to rookie Cliff 
Branch They scored again on a 
Blanda field goal to take a 24-17 
lead. 

After his first series, Dowling 
began to move the Pats. Several of 
his drives were hampered by 
penalties. In total, the Pats had 9 
penalties for 114 yards. He did put 
together one touchdown drive, 
going 74 yards in 9 plays. The 
running and pass-catching of Jack 
Maitland helped bring the ball into 
Oakland territory, along with a 
fine catch by Hubie Bryant. Tow 
long passes to Randy Vataha. both 
(>< which he caught, finally resulted 
in a touchdown after the referee 
ruled that Vataha had trapped the 
ball on his first catch. The instant 
replay showed that he caught the 
ball against his thigh, not the 
ground. It didn't matter, as the 
Pats scored two plays later, but it 
was a hell of a catch. 

The Raiders broke the tit with a 
fourth period touchdown, scored by 
Pete Banaszek following a drive 
highlighted by the running of 
Stabler. Davis, and Hubbard. 

The Pats were weak in the 
defense against the rush, but 
improved from the first period, 
when they were woeful. They 
showed an improved pass rush, 
dropping the Oakland quar- 
terbacks five times for 36 yards. 



The pass defense looked all right, 
but was not outstanding. Defensive 
standouts were Julius Adams, 
Dave Rowe. Rick Cash. Bill Hobbs, 
and Ken Price. Offensively. Brian 
Dowling did a fine job at quar- 
terback. Steve Goepel. his com- 
petition for the number two 
quarterback job. did not play, but 
Dowling must be rated ahead in the 
battle after Saturday night. Jack 
Maitland. Josh Ashton. and Sam 
Adams also did well on offense. 

The w ide receivers are supposed 
to be this team's strength, and 
should be. Randy Vataha looks as 
good as he did last year. The other 
three leading candidates. Reggie 
Rucker, Hubie Bryant, and Tom 
Reynolds, each caught two passes 
Rucker is slated to play behind 
Vataha. Reynolds caught two. plus 
another which was called back. 
Hubie. the intended receiver on six 
passes, as Coach Masur w anted to 
take a good look at him. Of the six, 
one was poorly thrown and in- 
tercepted, another overthrown. 
Twice Hubie made excellent, 
difficult catches, and twice he 
dropped the ball when wide open. 
Bryant should be a fine pass- 
catcher this season, but has to be 
more consistent than he was 
Saturday night. 

The Patriots resume practice 
today. Their next game is Saturday 
in Philadelphia against the Eagles. 
It is to be hoped that they can 
overcome the mistakes they made 
Saturday night, particularly as 
concerns penalties. 





The Cast 

Chip Keyes, a former student of George Sherman at Trinity College, 
formed the original Portable Circus. A playwright, in addition to his work 
with The Portable Circus, he recently had his first play produced 
professionally. 

Mark Williams was a Philosophy major who dropped out of college for 
a year, worked as a railroad laborer and upon returning to Trinity, joined 
The Portable Circus. He lists among his interests guitar playing, 
songwriting, motorcycling and cosmological mysticism. 

The only non-Trinity College member of the troupe, Lisa Milligan 
graduated with a B.A. in Drama from Skidmore College. She has ap- 
peared with several regional theaters and for a time, after leaving 
Skidmore. taught English to the foreign born. 

The only married member of the troupe, Steve Charleston was a 
Religion and Philosophy major in college. A native Oklahoman, he 
considered the ministry before joining The Portable Circus and has co- 
authored a text >n religion for college use. 

As an undergraduate at Trinity College, Jeffrey Lippa's principal in- 
terests were theater, music and making people laugh. Among his outside 
interests he lists his dog, The Grateful Dead and macrobiotic cooking. He 
comes from Beverly, Massachusetts. 

Patriot Statistics 



Tanglewood-Details, page four. (Photo by Larry Gold) 









Yards 




Passing 


Attempts 


Completions 


Gained 


TD's Inl 


Plunkett 


12 


3 


44 





Dowling 


18 


9 
Yards 


130 


1 1 


Receiving 


Number 


Gained 


TD's 




Bryant 


2 


54 







Rucker 


2 


27 







Maitland 


2 


26 







Reynolds 


2 


24 







Garrett 


2 


11 







Vataha 


1 


21 


1 




Windsor 


1 


11 
Yards 







Rushing 


Attempts 


Gained 


Avg. 


TOs 


Garrett 


13 


31 


2.3 


1 


Dowling 


3 


28 


9.3 





Maitland 


5 


22 


5.2 





Ashton 


4 


21 


5.2 





Gladieux 


3 


9 


3.0 





Plunkett 


1 


8 


8.0 





Lawson 


3 


1 


0.3 





Punting 


Attempts 


Yardage 


Avg. 




Robertson 


4 


146 


36.5 




Spicko 


3 


107 


35.6 




Benien 


1 


34 


34.0 




Total Yards Gained 294 








Rushing 


120 








Passing 


174 









Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 

Campus Carousel 

Who's Libel? 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1972 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1972 



by Tony Granite 

FLA. PREXIES NOT LIABLE 
FOR LIBEL is the ruling of that 
state's attorney general, according 
to a page one piece in the USoFla 
Oracle. 

The ruling followed an earlier 
ruling that university presidents 
are the official "publishers" of the 
campus media, but they have no 
authority to exercise "prior 
restraint" over what goes into the 
publications. 

The current opinion that a 
university president cannot be 
sued for libel because of a 
scurrilous statement printed in a 
school publication also included 
the advice that "It might be a good 
idea to fire the student editor 
responsible for the libel, so that the 
injured party could not accuse the 
university president of tacitly 
approving the libelous statement 
by his inaction." 

Editors take heed! 



* * * » 



ALSO IN THE LEGAL ARENA 

comes word from the weekly 
bulletin at UMass-Amherst war- 
ning its employees who are 
reimbursed for travel and lodging 
by the University that if they have 
received refunds from hotels, they 

Art Buchwald 



must return the refund to the 
Controller. 

The situation results from a 
successful class action suit against 
such hotels as New York City's 
Waldorf Astoria, which had been 
tacking on "service charges" to 
individual bills without specifying 
the nature of the charges. Such 
practices had been ruled illegal 
and the hotels were ordered to 
reimburse their guests. 

It's hard for anyone to make a 

buck, these days. 

a • • • 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
REQUIREMENTS ARE OUT at 

University of California, Santa 
Barbara, according to notice in 
Daily News there. 
The Academic Senate voted 

almost two to one to leave the 
determination of general education 
language requirements to in- 
dividual departments. 

At the same time, senate leaders 
issued public admonitions to the 
Administration to support the 
language departments during the 
transition period that will ac- 
company curricular changes 
among them. 

One man's "Si, Si" is another 
man's "Nyet." 




G£0£GE 7V£ G'W ***** 



Who Wants To Be The 



WASHINGTON-It seems that 
last week Sen. George McGovern 
offered everyone the Vice 
Presidency. I became aware of this 
last Thursday when the taxi driver 
who takes me to work was late. 

"I'm sorry I was delayed. I just 
took George McGovern to his 
Senate office and he asked me to 
run with him on the Democratic 
ticket." 

"He did?" 

"Yeah. But he was pretty honest 
about it. He said he had asked 
Sens. Kennedy, Ribicoff and 
Humphrey; Gov. Lucey of 
Wisconsin, Mayor Lindsay of New 
York, State Sen. Kalowitz of New 
Mexico, Alderman Hummer of 
Primrose, Vt., City Councilman 
Rigley of Sam Hill, Idaho, Justice 
of the Peace Dumbottom of Long 
Fence, Montana, and 16 notary 
publics in Detroit. They all turned 
him down." 

"What did you say when he 
asked you?" I inquired. 

"I told McGovern that ordinarily 
I would have been flattered, but I 
had heard through the grapevine 
that he had already offered the 
spot to his dry cleaner on 
MacArthur Blvd. I said I thought I 
should have been asked first." 

"How did you know that for 
sure?" 

"Because the checkout man at 
the A&P near McGovern's home 




told me he had been asked before 
the dry cleaner." 

"Why didn't the A&P checkout 
man accept the Vice Presidency?" 

"He's fooling around with a 
customer, the wife of someone high 
in government, and he's afraid it 
would come out." 

"It probably would," I agreed. 
"Do you know of anyone else the 
senator has talked to?" 

"I know he asked the manager of 
the Esso gasoline station on 
Massachusetts Ave. But the 
manager said he didn't want to 
give up his job because he was 
expecting a promotion to a much 



larger station on the Baltimore- 
Washington Expressway." 

"It must be discouraging for the 
candidate to have so many people 
turn him down. He didn't ask his 
gardener, did he?" 

"No, he wants to keep his gar- 
dener," the taxi driver said, "but 
he did ask his dentist." 

"You mean the dentist turned it 
down, too?" 

"The problem there, as I un- 
derstand it, is the dentist has three 
speeding tickets on the books, and 
when the staff heard about it they 
crossed him off the list." 

"Did he ask any women that you 
know of?" 

"His wife's hairdresser. But her 
husband wouldn't let her accept. 
McGovern seriously considered 
one of the women who lives on his 
street, but she turned out to be a 
Republican." 

"Well, you can't say he hasn't 
tried," I said. 

"I heard the other night he of- 
fered it to one of his Secret Ser- 
vicemen." 

"Which one?" 

"Any one who wanted it. But 
they've been around Vice 
Presidents a lot, and they know the 
job isn't much." 

We arrived at the office and I 
paid him. Then I went upstairs. My 
secretary was waiting 

breathlessly. "George McGovern 



wants you to call him. It's urgent." 

I placed the call. 

McGovern asked, "How would 
you like to be my Vice President?" 

"Let me say yes before you 
change your mind." 

"Good. I'll give you Frank 
Mankiewicz." 

Frank got on the phone. "Art, 
are there any skeletons in your 
closet?" 

"You've got to be kidding!" I 
said. "Where do you want me to 
start?" 

Copyright 1972, Los Angeles 
Times 




"And rest assured that my 
running mate has never 
suffered from mental 
fatigue." 



The Crier is a semi-weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in the Campus 
Center, Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely responsible for 
the contents. No copy is censored by the administration before 
Publication. Represented for national advertising by National 
Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



James E. Gold 
Jack Koch 
Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 
Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 
PERFORMING ARTS EDITOR Elleni Koch 

PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nash 



OCCASIONAL EDITORIAL CARTOONIST 
SUMMER SPORTS EDITOR 
I The Threshold of a relationship. 



Shelly Karp 
Ed Bryant 



The Vice-Presidency Really Takes All Kinds 



By STEVE HARVEY 
Los Angeles Times 

Some U.S. Vice Presidents have gone on to 
become President. But John Breckinridge 
followed another path. He became a pirate. 

Other occupants of America's second 
highest office have included an indicted 
murderer and traitor, an innkeeper and a 
pair of accused swindlers. One Vice 
President showed up drunk for his 
inauguration ceremonies. A vice 
presidential candidate received three 
million votes even though he was dead. 

Breckinridge, the last Vice President 
before the Civil War, joined the Confederate 
army as a brigadier general when the 
fighting began. When the war ended, he 
refused to surrender. Gathering a small 
force of officers, he set out for Cuba. 

It was at this point tl<t Breckinridge and 
his men became pirates. Eventually, they 
captured a ship manned by Union deserters 
and sailed it to the Caribbean island. 

From Havana, the general sent funds to 
assist the lawyers of Jefferson Davis, the 
Confederate President. But there was little 
else he could do. After stays in England and 
Canada, he returned to the United States 



when he was assured that all was forgiven. 

Breckinridge provided one of the many 
strange chapters in the history of the Vice 
Presidency. 

Aaron Burr, who served under Thomas 
Jefferson, was the nation's third Vice 
President and the only one, so far, to 
allegedly murder a man while in office. 

In 1804, Burr killed former Secretary of 
the Treasury Alexander Hamilton in a duel 
which ended a long and bitter feud. In- 
credibly, Burr returned to Washington to 
resume his duties, moving one senator to 
declare that "the high office of President is 
filled by an infidel ; that of Vice President by 
a murderer." 

Dueling, though illegal, was not un- 
common during that period and Burr was 
indicted, but never tried. He couldn't seem 
to stay out of trouble, however. 

In 1806, Burr was indicted for another 
capital offense-treason. It was charged that 
Burr had organized an army and planned to 
capture the Louisiana Territory as well as 
Mexico for his domain. 

Attempting to escape at one point, he was 
carried back on the shoulders of one of the 



local authorities. When he was found in- 
nocent-on technical grounds-he decided to 
leave the United States. 

Burr went to England and was promptly 
expelled. After wandering for several years, 
he returned to New York to practice law. To 
the surprise of nearly everyone, he lived to 
be 80 years old. 

Richard Mentor Johnson, who was the 
Democratic Vice President from 1837-41, 
gained notoriety during his term by taking 
leave of Washington for one summer to run 
his inn in Kentucky. 

Johnson's image as a part-time bartender 
appealed little to party leaders. His im- 
pressive record as an Indian fighter-he had 
claimed credit for killing the Shawnee chief 
Tecumseh in 1813-was forgotten. 

In a brazen slap at Johnson, as well as at 
his office, the Democrats refused to 
nominate anyone for Vice President in 1840. 
Democratic members of the electoral 
college were informed they could vote for 
whomever they preferred. 

Johnson, however, campaigned hard for 
his re-election with the inspiring slogan 
"Rumpsey-dumpsey, rumpsey-dumpsey, 



Col. Johnson killed Tecumseh." The 
Democrats lost the election. 

Another Johnson-Andrew-became a 
household word on his inauguration day 
when he stumbled in drunk. 

The poor man, who actually drank less 
than most of his contemporaries, had been 
stricken with typhoid fever following the 
1864 election. Before the ceremonies began, 
a doctor suggested that Johnson drink some 
whisky for his weakened condition. But 
Johnson took too much of the medicine. 

Just as he was about to be sworn in, he 
launched into a rambling, extemporaneous 
speech, in which he berated himself as well 
as some cabinet officers and Supreme Court 
justices. He ended his talk, according to 
witnesses, by giving the Bible a noisy kiss. 

Perhaps the most unusual episode of all 
occurred in 1912 when Vice President John 
Schoolcraft Sherman died after having been 
nominated to run again with William 
Howard Taft. 

It was too late to remove Sherman's name 
from the ballot. He became the only dead 
man in history to receive three million votes 
for Vice President. The ticket lost. 



University of Massachusetts — The Crier - Page Three 



FllSCO To Head Drum, Bugle Display Dedicated To Boyden] 



Hadley Schools 



The Hadley School Committee 
has announced the appointment of 
Armand A. Fusco as Superin- 
tendent of Schools. 

Mr. Fusco, who had been 
Director of Guidance and School 
Psychologist in Hadley for the past 
school year, was born in New 
Britain, Connecticut and attended 
local public schools there. 

After serving three years in the 
U.S. Army, he attended Central 
Connecticut State College and 
received his B.S. degree in 
education. He earned his Master of 
Arts degree in Educational Ad- 
ministration from Columbia 
University in New York, and a 
Sixth-Level diploma in guidance 
and counseling from the University j 
of Connecticut. At present, he is 
enrolled in the doctoral program at 
the UMass and expects to receive 
his Doctor of Education degree this 
coming semester. 

Mr. Fusco has had broad ex- 
perience in public, private and 
business education. He has been a 
classroom teacher, department 
chairman, guidance counselor, 
guidance director and school 
psychologist in public schools in 
Connecticut and Massachusetts. In 




The Superbowl of Music drum and bugle com- 
petition which will benefit Belchertown State School 
residents will be dedicated to the late Dr. Frank L. 
Boyden, former head of Deerfield Academy. 

Five leading senior drum and bugle corps from the 
U.S. and Canada will compete in the superbowl 
sponsored by the Belchertown Friends Association. 
Competitors will be: the New York City Sky liners, 
Drum Corps Associates national champions; Les 
Diplomates of Quebec City; the Renegades of 
Everett; the Ontario Commanders, Canadian 
national champions; and the Sunrisers of Hemp- 
stead, L.I. 

Mr. John C. Boyden of Yarmouth Port, son of the 
late renowned educator, will present the Dr. Frank L. 
Boyden Memorial Trophy to the first place drum and 
bugle corps at the Superbowl Saturday, Aug. 19, at 
the UMass Alumni Stadium in Amherst. 

Frank Boyden, who died in April, 1972, arrived at 
Deerfield Academy in 1902 and spent 66 years as 
headmaster, bringing the school from relative ob- 



scurity to a leading position among college 
preparatory schools in the country. He also gave 
many years to public servicp, with positions as trustee 
tor about two dozen educational institutions, in- 
cluding the UMass for which he was board chairman 
for much of the 1960-70 decade of the school's greatest 
growth. 

The program will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the 20,000- 
seat UMass Alumni Stadium, donated for the event 
by the school. Honorary chairmen of the superbowl 
committee are Bishop Christopher J. Weldon of 
Springfield and Judge Samuel Blassberg of Green- 
field. Co-chairmen are Dr. Benjamin Ricci, president 
of the Belchertown State School Friends Association, 
and Dr. William Venman, UMass director of Con- 
tinuing Education. 

Tickets are from $2 to $4 and may be reserved by 
contacting Joe Sexton, 229 Whitmore, UMass, 
Amherst, 01002. All proceeds will benefit mentally 
retarded residents of Belchertown State School. Rain 
date for the event is Sunday, Aug. 20, at 1 : 30 p.m. 



Armand 



Fusco 



addition, he had been Director of 
the Discovery Center of preschool 
children, Director and Co-Founder 
of Springfield Preparatory School, 
a college prep secondary school; 
Director of Educational and 
Vocational Guidance Services, a 
private testing clinic; and 
President and Founder of Parkside 
School and Academy, an 
elementary-secondary school for 
children with learning disabilities. 



Letters To The Editor 



To the Editor 

Maybe I'm 

campus with 



crazy, but on a 
22,000 others, I'd 
rather not go to the Xerox room in 
Goodell Library where service is 
rendered with a grouch. 

To keep my sanity and give me 
my touch with humanity, I'd prefer 
to go and get my work done where 
people (employees of U.Mass?) in 
their contact with students can, as 



Continuing Ed Offers Concord Courses 



Four evening education courses 
will be given in Concord this fall by 
UMass Division of Continuing 
Education. 

Classes will meet one evening a 
week, Tuesdays or Thursdays, 
from 6:30 to 9:30, at the Emerson 
School on Stowe St. They will begin 
Sept. 25 and run through Dec. 18. 
The program is sponsored by the 
Concord Public Schools and the 
Concord-Carlisle Regional School 
District in conjunction with the 
Concord and Concord-Carlisle 
teachers associations. 

Current Issues in Education will 
meet Tuesdays and offers three 
graduate or undergraduate credit 
hours. It is designed for parents, 
teachers or administrators and 
will examine such issues as the 
open classroom, alternative 



schools, drug abuse, racism, and 
others. 

Seminar in Reading will meet 
Thursdays and also carries three 
graduate-undergraduate credit 
hours. It's aim is to acquaint 
teachers with innovations in 
elementary reading instruction. 
Race Relations meets Tuesdays, 
carries three graduate or un- 
dergraduate credits, and will in- 
vestigate the American black 
experience and minority-majority 
relations. 

Social Problems will meet 
Thursdays and offers three un- 



dergraduate credits. It will stress 
theoretical as well as research 
approaches and will cover such 
areas as deviance, social 
disorganization and change, and 
techniques of intervention. Class 
time will be divided between 
lecture and discussion. 

Registration is now open by mail 
or may be done in person Sept. 20 
from 7 to 9 p.m. at Concord- 
Carlisle High School. Registration 
forms and full information is 
available from the Division of 
Continuing Education, 920 Campus 
Center, UMass, Amherst, Mass. 
01002. 



lIMnWM Theatre 

Rt«. 5 & 10 So. Deerfiey 
6658744 

NOW thru TUES. 

Hannie Caulder 
The first lady gunfighter. 




New Mini-Semester 
G.C.C. Schedules 



A new mini-semester -the 
January Term-will be added to the 
academic schedule this year at 
Greenfield Community College. 

Traditionally, final 
examinations at the college have 
been held during January. This 
year, however, finals will end on 
December 22 and the spring 
semester will begin on February 5. 
The new January Term will run 
from January 8 to 26, according to 
President Lewis O. Turner. 



The purpose of the January term 



PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS 

"Ifonnie 
Caulder 

A TIGON BRfTISH/CURTWEl PR00UCTI0N 

_, . PANHVISION IN C010R I 
IRJ A PARAMOUNT PICTURE 



ALSO 

Paramount Pictures presents 
An ITC Production 

SHIRLEY MacLAIIME 

"THE POSSESSION 
OFJOELDELANEY" 



H Color A Paramount Picture ;k 



roflnm Hew 
w*d. Thure. Sun, AAon. Tuk 



For the answer to 
last week's trivia 
question and other 
pertinent 5-college 
information, call 5- 
2566. 



is to provide enriching activities 
not available to students and 
professional staff during the 
regualr academic year, op- 
portunity for individual study and 
research, community service 
experiences, specialized short 
courses, workshops for students 
and the community-at-large, 
workshops for professional staff, 
and research projects of value to 
the college, such as follow up 
studies of graduates. 

"The college as a community of 
scholars may be a bit traditional 
and narrow," Turner commented, 
"but the college is composed of 
people who are interested in 
learning, and so our theme for the 
January Term might be 'Exploring 
and Learning Together'-all the 
members of the college community 
participating in various types of 
activities-courses, workshops, 
some for credit, some for fun. Our 
own insight and creativity are the 
only limits." 



UMASS. SUMMER THEATRE 
PRODUCTION 
OPENING TOMORROW 

Tennessee Williams' 

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 

Bartlett Auditorium 
Air conditioned 

August 9-13 8:30 P.M. 

Reservations-Call 545-2579 

or tickets available at Box Office 

$1.00 UMass. students w/summer ID 

$1.50 genera I public 



an exampie, be mindful of the fact 
that students are also humans with 
their own individual problems, and 
are not to be treated as a punching 
bag for one's emotional outbursts. 
(For too long I have been hearing 
froih graduate and undergraduate 
students alike, that people in of- 
fices, etc., treat the students as 
dirt, as numbers, as digits, ad 
infinitum.) 

Therefore, even if it means 
carrying heavy bound periodicals, 
whenever possible, I bring my 
material to the Printing Shop in the 
Campus Center. Why? Because 
here I get service with a smile. And 
that to me is important. That, to 
everyone, is important. Because 
that is yet another light in what- 



could-be-an-otherwise-dark-day. 

Let this be my tribute to our 
friends in the Printing Shop, and to 
staff and faculty all over U. Mass 
to whom students are not just 
punch cards. 

N. Haridasan 



Letters 



Yes, do send in your comments 
on campus life, international af 
fairs, national emergencies, etc 
All we demand is that all letters to 
the-editor be typed on a sixty-space 
line, one side of each page, double 
spaced. 




But I only came in for an oil change ' " 



No Automotive Rip Off's 
SPENCER'S Mobil STATION 

161 NO. PLEASANT ST., AMHERST ( Nextto P.O.) 

FREE ESTIMATES 
Open 24 hours — Road Service — 256-8426 



P0KTARLE CIMUS 



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AUG. 9 



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Im+U .- 



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Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 





Colin To Conduct Concerts 

Of Berlioz, Wagner, Verdi 



TANGLEWOOD-Colin Davis, 
Music Director of the Royal Opera 
House. Covent Garden, and 
Principal Guest Conductor of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
beginning in September 1972 will 
conduct three concerts by the 
Boston Symphony at Tanglewood 
as part of the seventh weekend of 
Berkshire Festival Concerts 
August 11, 12 and 13. 

Friday evening August 11 at 9:00 
p.m. in the Shed, Mr. Davis con- 
ducts the Orchestra in music of 
Wagner and Verdi, including 
Wagner's Funf Gedichte von 
Mathilde Wesendonk (Wesendonk 
songs) and the "Prelude and 
Liebestod" from Tristan and 
Isolde. Soprano Jessye Norman is 
soloist in the Wesendonk songs and 
"Liebestod" from Tristan and 
Isolde. Following intermission, 
Mr. Davis conducts the Boston 
Symphony and the Tanglewood 
Festival Chorus in a performance 
of Verdi's Quattro Pezzi Sacri 
(Four Sacred Pieces). 

The Weekend Prelude, at 7:00 
p.m. in the Shed and free to ticket- 
holders of the 9:00 p.m. concert, 
features pianist Gina Bachauer in 
a piano recital playing Mozart's 
Piano sonata in F. K. 332, Ravel's 
(.iispanl de la nuit. and Brahms' 
Variations on a theme by Paganini, 
set 2. op. 35. 

Saturday morning at 10:30. Colin 
Davis leads the season's seventh 
( )pen Rehearsal. Tickets go on sale 
two hours before the beginning of 
the rehearsal at the Festival Ticket 
Office and are priced at $2.50 each. 
Proceeds from the sale of tickets 
benefits the Orchestra's Pension 
Fund. The Saturday morning Open 
Rehearsals offer the public the 
opportunity to observe the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, conductors, 
and soloists preparing music for 
the Berkshire Festival Concerts in 
a relaxed and informal at- 



mosphere. 

Saturday evening at 8:30 p.m., 
Mr. Davis conducts the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in per- 
formances of Berlioz' overture to 
Les francs-juges (the first per- 
formance at the Berkshire 
Festival), Beethoven's Piano 
concerto no. 4 with soloist Gina 
Bachauer, and Brahms' Symphony 
no. 3. 

Works of Beethoven and Berlioz 
will be featured at the Sunday 
afternoon Berkshire Festival 
concert, August 13, 1972 at 2:30 
p.m. The concert opens with 



Beethoven's Symphony no. 3 
"Eroica", followed by a per- 
formance of Berlioz' exciting Te 
Deum with the Tanglewood 
Festival Chorus, John Oliver, 
director, and Boston Symphony 
Orchestra organist Berj 
Zamkochian. 

Tickets for these concerts, and 
all other Berkshire Festival 
concerts are now on sale at the 
Berkshire Festival Ticket Office in 
Lenox, Massachusetts 01240, area 
code 413, 637-1600. and at all 
Ticketron locations in New York 
and New England. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1972 

Review-Tanglewood 

Oboes And Sparrows 

By ELLENI KOCH 

It is difficult to imagine a more pleasant way to spend a Sunday af- 
ternoon than being at Tanglewood, especially when the weather is per- 
STit was Weekend In the midst of the greenery of the Berkshire 
Hills Michael Tilson Thomas conducted two pieces in Sunday afternoon 
concert, the Oboe Concerto in C attributed to Joseph Haydn, and Gustav 
Mahler's Fifth Symphony. 

As soon as the Oboe Concerto commenced, two unannounced per- 
formers delighted some of us in the audience by displaying their talents 
^ free of charge and most joyously. Two sparrows in the rafters uncannily 
kept up with the changing rhythm, with splendid results. I, for one, ap- 
nreciated this surprise uncommissioned burst ot accompaniment. 

However the human element, oboist Ralph Gomberg, performed 
adequately' but I was disappointed that he did not show off more of his 
virtuosity at the end of the first movement where there is an extended 
recapitulation. I always enjoy getting that super-saturated feeling when a 
soloist is left to do his own thing The third and final movement, the 
Rondo, was charming, and it did allow a thorough display of the oboe's 

r3 The mood was changed drastically as the concert-goers were enveloped 
in the opening movement of Symphony No. 5 by Mahler. The "Trauer- 
marsch Sturmisch bewegt", or, funeral march, with stormy movement, 
was conducted with intense fervor by Mr. Thomas, who seemed totally 
absorbed throughout the entire performance of this forceful work. 
Marvelous brooding and melancholic passages alternated with more 
oDtimistic themes and variations-truly a musical statement of life. The 



lave 



to a 




Michael Tilson Thomas conducts Boston Symphony Orchestra. (Photo by Larry Gold) 



heavy sounds of the powerful percussion instruments g; 
lighter second movement, the Scherzo, in which the mood was elevated 
by Charles Yancich's French horn obbligato. Mahler is not recommended 
for light listening, but if one wishes to concentrate on exciting creations of 
purely musical forms, the Fifth Symphony is perfect. 

Tanglewood Parade To Feature 1812 Overture 

TANGLEWOOD -Michael Tilson Thomas. Associate Conductor of 

the Boston Symphony, and Prin- 
cipal Guest Conductor of the Or 
chestra beginning in September 
1972, conducts the annual Gala 
Benefit Concert for the Berkshire 
Music Center, Tuesday, August 15 
at 8 : 30 p . m . i n Tanglewood 's Music 
Shed. 

The concert, featuring the 
combined Boston Symphony, 
Berkshire Music Center and 
Boston University Young Artist 
Orchestras (the first concert ever 
to involve three orchestras in the 
Shedi. includes Tchaikovsky's 1X12 
Overture with cannons, Handel's 
Royal Fireworks Music. 

Respighi's Fountains of Home and 
Siegfried's Rhine Journey by 
Wagner. 

Other Tanglewood-on-Parade 
events include an afternoon of 
"mini-concerts" given by mem 
bers of the Berkshire Music Center 
beginning at 2:30 p.m. at various 
locations on the Tanglewood 
grounds. 

Tickets are $2 for Lawn ad 
mission, $4 for regular seats in the 
Shed, and S6 for Box Seats and 
entitle the concert-goer to all 
events. 

The Festival Ticket Office is at 
Tanglewood. Lenox. 
Massachusetts 01240 (413-637-1600 >. 



Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BR ANDY WINE 's 
beautiful new one and two bedroom model apartments. 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few 
minutes we'll show you all the reasons in the world why 
BRANDYWINE is a better place to live. We invite you 
to compare features and compare prices. The few 
minutes you spend with our two beautiful models could 
be the most important minutes you'll spend all year. 




Conveniences which make BRANDYWINE so 
eminently 'livable" include: 

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All brand name, house sized appliances 

An abundance of closet space 

Individually controlled, central gas heat, air- 
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Extra soundproofing and security features 

Large, partially enclosed, private patios and 
balconies 

Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 

Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager responsible 
for all apartment services and maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam Furniture 
Leasing Company, Hartford, Connecticut 

One Bedroom Units from $200 
Two Bedroom Units from $225 



\**r****] H 




BRANDYWINE at Amherst 



50 MEADOW STREET 
AMHERST 

549-0600 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1972 

Book Review 



University of Massachusetts — The Crier — Page Five 



c i 



Reorganizing Medicine 



Anything Goes 



> ? 



In Critical Condition — The Crisis in America's 
Health Care, by Edward M. Kennedy. 

Publisher: Simon & Schuster, Inc. 

Price: $6.95 

By ELLENI KOCH 

Almost every American has or knows of someone 
who has lived through some kind of horror story 
concerning the quest for decent medical care, and its 
payment, regardless whether this care was adequate. 
Too often people find that their insurance coverage 
(if any) helps only a fraction. Their savings become 
exhausted, and they are left not only with the suf- 
fering of a serious illness or injury, but also with an 
impassable financial hurdle. Further medical care 
then is often unavailable because of inability to pay. 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy in his new book, IN 
CRITICAL CONDITION, The Crisis In America's 
Health Care, makes such tragedies painfully clear 
through sworn testimonies at Senate Health Sub- 
committee Hearings across the nation. Readers will 
be jarred at the stark realization that the United 
States fails its citizens in giving them good health 
care that is affordable. All the stories recounted by 
Senator Kennedy seem to form the humanistic basis 
of his plan for good health care for every American, 
no matter what the financial condition of the patient. 

The Health Security Program which he advocates 
seems to have been designed after the Senate Health 
Subcommittee did extensive reviewing of cases in 
this country, and after visits to Great Britain, Den- 
mark, Sweden, and Israel. These countries are far 
superior to the United States, according to Kennedy, 
in several aspects of health care, notably in its 
distribution to all the people. 

The Senator believed a fact-finding mission would 
be beneficial in an attempt to improve our own 
system by applying some proved methods. Kennedy 
sustains that under his program, medicine will not 
become "socialized", certainly a controversial word 
to apply. Instead he hopes to devise a compassionate, 
concerned, and sensitive health system which is 
desperately needed by so many, and at the same time 
giving decision-making powers to the patrons, the 



receivers of health care. 

Kennedy points out that as it stands now, the 
medical system is not run in the fashion of private 
enterprise, since the consumer really has no power to 
compare prices, etc. Under his new proposals, 
however, competition would be induced, resulting in 
a better market for the consumer. The way to do this, 
he contends, is by first having the federal govern- 
ment be the only health insurance carrier for 
everyone, paid for through taxes, according to ear- 
nings. In turn, the providers of health care would be 
paid directly through the government, thus avoiding 
hassles over bills. No one worries about paying the 
bill, no one worries about getting paid, etc. But what 
about abuses? Senator Kennedy makes the believable 
point that very few persons would' abuse a non- 
deductible system. The present problem is that too 
ma»iy people are "cost-conscious" and delay treat- 
ment until it is sometimes too late and invariably 
more costly in the long run when they finally do go to 
an MD. "How much health care Americans get 
should depend not on how much they can afford but on 
how much they need." 

Although only superficial coverage was given to the 
aftermath of the no-more-to-be-in-existence in- 
surance companies and their employees (somehow 
their valuable experienced service would be saved 
and channeled through the federal government), 
Kennedy was redundant in describing and stating 
that his plan, rather than socializing medicine, would 
set up incentives for efficient utilization of medical 
services, i.e. medical cooperatives organized of 
several specialists aided by a single staff and 
laboratory. Also needless duplication of expensive 
equipment by neighboring hospitals, once used as 
prestige techniques to induce the best doctors to 
come, would no longer be necessary. These and other 
devices make organized medicine a thing not to be 
feared by Americans, but a viable entity of the future 
which hopefully will flourish. 

Senator Kennedy has presented a strong argument 
in favor of reorganizing medicine realistically and 
compatibly with our form of democratic government. 



E.T.S. Announces Schedule 



PRINCETON, N.J.-Educational 
Testing Service announced today 
that undergraduates and others 
preparing to go to graduate school 
may take the Graduate Record 
Examinations on any of six dif- 
ferent test dates during the current 
academic year. 

The first testing date for the GRE 
is October 28, 1972. Scores trom 
this administration will be 
reported to the graduate schools 
around December 4. Student 
planning to register for the October 
test date are advised that ap- 



plications received by ETS after 
October 3 will incur at $3.50 late 
registration fee. After October 10, 
there is no guarantee that ap- 
plications for the October test fee. 
After October 10, there is no 
guarantee that applications for the 
October test date can be processed. 
The other five test dates are 
December 9, 1972, January 20, 
February 24, (only the Aptitude 
Test is administered), April 28, and 
June 16, 1973. Choice of test dates 
should be determined by the 



'Being Earnest'inGreenfield 



GREENFIELD, MASS Arena 

Civic Theatre is presenting Oscar 
Wilde's masterpiece of farce "The 
Importance Of Being Earnest" this 
week Thursday through Saturady 
at the Roundhouse, Franklin 
County Fairgrounds, at 8:30 p.m. 

Wilde's witty commentary on 
Victorian society has had in- 
numberable worldwide produc- 
tions, both professional and 
amateur, and is always prominent 
in the lists of favorite plays. 

The Arena Civic Theatre 
prosentation of "The Importance 
Of Being Earnest" is directed by 
William Christern and designed by 
Les Moyse. 

Lady Bracknell is played by 
Ellen Snyder of Northampton who 
has appeared in productions at 
Smith College, Amherst College, 
the University of Massachusetts, 
the Circle Players of Northampton 
and in summer stock on Cape Cod 
and in theaters in New Jersey. 
Mrs. Snyder has been seen in the 
Arena Civic Theatre productions of 



The Dark At The Top Of The 
Stairs" and "Plaza Suite". 

Edward Howes of Amherst, who 
appeared in Off-Broadway plays 
and in the Independent Theatre 
Group's "The Connection" plays 
John Worthing. John Hines, 
graduate of Boston University 
Theater, who has been in six ACT 
productions plays Algernon. Leslie 
Pfeil, last seen in "Plaza Suite" 
and "A Lion In Winter" with ACT 
and previously with the Stockade 
Players, plays Gwendoline. Sue 
Foudy, graduate of the University 
of Massachusetts and a recent 
addition to the ACT company, 
plays Cecily. Others in the coast 
are Richard Thayer, who played in 
"A Christmas Carol" and "The 
Mousetrap", as Rev. Chasuble; 
Ann Christern as Miss Prism; 
Gene Fahey as Lane and Brent 
Brown as Merriman. 

For reservations call 413-773-7991 
from 3 to 8 p.m. daily except 
Sunday. 



requirements of graduate schools 
or fellowship sponsors to which one 
is applying. Scores are usually 
reported to graduate schools five 
weeks after a test date. 

Full details and registration 
forms for the GRE are contained in 
the 1972-73 GRE Information 
Bulletin. The Bulletin also contains 
forms and insturctions for 
requesting transcript service on 
GRE scores already on file with 
ETS. This booklet is available on 
most campuses or may be ordered 
from: Educational Testing Ser- 
vice, Box 955, Princeton, New 
Jersey 08540; Educational Testing 
Service, 1947 Center Street, 
.Berkeley, California 94704; 
I Educational Testing Service, 960 
Grove Street, Evanston, Illinois 
6020 



Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" 
will be presented this week by the 
Summer Theatre of Amherst, 
senior division of Community 
Musical '72. It's a lively and 
hilarious musical comedy of 
romance and intrigue on the high 
seas. The cast consists of an en- 
thusiastic group of young actors 
from the Amherst area, working 
under the direction of Martin 
Kitrosser. 

Broker's assistant Billy Crocker, 
played by Phil Keenan, unex- 
pectedly sails for England in 
pursuit of his girlfriend, Hope (Lyn 
Singer) , who meanwhile is en route 
to marry an English lord, Peter 
Taylor. Among the other 
passengers in Reno Sweeney 
(Mary Lee DeRose), who is an ex- 
evangelist and nightclub singer, 
with her Hallelujah Angels, Susan 
Schoenberger, Carol Wogrin, 
Elaine Powers, Carla Williams, 
and Carol Mellen. They all hold a 
revivalist meeting in the lounge 
and seek distilled waters in the 
bar. 

Also on board is Moonface (Peter 
Ignatovich), number thirteen on 

'Men At Bay' 

The Coalition for Environmental 
Quality will show a 26 minute color 
and sound film called "Men at 
Bay" at 6:30 p.m. tonight in Room 
165 of the Campus Center. The film 
presents various peopl's reactions 
to the deterioration of San Fran- 
cisco Bay in California. Af- 
terwards there may be discussion 
on environmental attitudes and 
how people perceive the 
deteriorating environment. 



the FBI's most wanted list. He is 
with Bonnie (Carol Price), the 
bouncing' and gregarious moll of 
Snake Eyes Johnson, whose failure 
to make the boat has provided Billy 
with a ticket, passport, and 
complications with the law 

Other parts are taken by Keith 
Kurman as a pompous bishop. 
Mary Ann Foley as Hope's social 
climbing mother, Tom McGrath as 
an explosive stockbroker, Paul 
Miller and Nick Leininger as two 
Chinese converts of the bishop who 
show unexpected skill with dice. 
Kay Cole and Jonathan Samit are 
ship officials, and David Miller and 
Mike Wilson represent the press. 

Philip Greenfield is the voca! 
director, Michael Greenebaum is 
instrumental director, and 
choreography is by Beverly 
Scarpace. Juli Beckett and Jim 
McCartney serve as stage 
manager and technical director, 
and Coordinator and business 
manager is James Whitney. 

The show will take place this 
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 
(Aug. 10,11,12) and next Friday 
and Saturday (Aug. 18,19) at the 
Amherst Regional High School. 
Show time is 8:15 and tickets are 
$1.50. For information and reserve 
seats call 253-9939. 



' HR Km Tte#t Moss AflNNftf PWtvMil 

Vm DRAKE 

1 MSTAURAM 

' TIL 2 A.M. 
ILLAGE INN 

Rathskeller 

1 40 International Beers] 

ART ANDREWS PLAYS 

COCKTAIL PIANO 

85 Amity St. 253-2 548 



Unique in Amherst 



JIMMIES 



SAVIN 
ROCK 



Come in and try our unique 

SPLIT HOT DOG, FRIED CLAMS, 
LOBSTER ROLLS etc. 

University Drive 

One Block From Campus 



DOUBLE FEATURE FILM SERIES 



A Walk In The 
Spring Rain 

Anthony Quinn 
Ingrid Bergman 



7 p.m. 



Baby 
Tin Rah 
Mart Fall 

Steve McQueen 
9 p.m. 



Sponsored by Summer Program Council 

Campus Center Auditorium 
Tuesday, August 8 

Free Admission — UMass Summer Students First 




Aug. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 

Blue Wall, 8:30 p.m. 

Free tickets at info desk, Campus Center 



J 



Page Six — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1972 




Bicycle Race Results 



WOMEN: (lmile) 

1. Janice Herlihy 

2. Jennifer Bielack 



TIME: MEN: (1.7 miles) 
3:52 l. Steve Mosher 
3:32 2. James Ross 

3. Tom O'Connor 

4. Steve Graf 

5. Paul Johnson 





6. 


Seth Rockwell 


4:23 


4:10 


7. 


Dave Griffin 


4:30 


4:10.5 


8. 


Ron Gordon 


4:39 


4:11 


9. 


Nelson Segelman 


4r40 


4:12 


10. 


Steve Shepherd 


5:23 


4:15 


11. 


Shunchi Yu 


6: 00 plus 



Intramural League Standings 



Men's Final Softball Standings as of August 4, 1972 



Intramural 
Playoffs Scheduled 

VOLLEYBALL PLAYOFFS 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 8th: 

1. (4:30- court #1) POLYMERS (league A) vs. PIPEFITTERS (league 
B) (for campus 3rd). 

2. (5:30- court 1) APK < league B) vs. PSD (league A) (1st match of best 
of 3 for campus champ) 

THURSDAY. AUGUST 10th: 

1. (4:30- court #1) APK vs. PSD (2nd match of best of 3 for campus 
champ). 
MONDAY, AUGUST 14th: 

1. (4:30- court #1) APK vs. PSD (if necessary) 

♦GAMES WILL BE PLAYED OUTDOORS. IF BAD WEATHER, 
GAMES WILL BE PLAYED IN BOYDEN GYM. 

SOFTBALL PLAYOFFS 

MONDAY, AUGUST 7th: 

1. (4:30- field #1 ) CIVIL ENGINEERING vs. BRETT BOMBERS 

2. (5:30- field HI) PHI SIGMA DELTA vs. GUNNERS 
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9th: 

1. (4:30- field ttl) LOSER 4:30 GAME VS. LOSER 5:30 GAME FOR 
CAMPUS 3rd. 

2. (5:30- field M ) WINNER 4:30 GAME VS. WINNER 5:30 GAME FOR 
CAMPUS CHAMPION AND CAMPUS RUNNER-UP. 

♦RAIN DATE FOR AUGUST 7th WILL BE AUGUST 9th AT SAME 
TIME. RAIN DATE FOR AUGUST 9th GAMES WILL BE AUGUST 10th. 
IF ANOTHER PLAYING DATE IS NEEDED, GAMES WILL BE 
PLAYED ON AUGUST 14th. 

Spectators are most welcomed. Outdoor games are played on fields 
opposite Soutl West College. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1972 



University of Massachusetts — The Crier - Page Seven 



Western League 

PSD 

Quiver 



W-L 

6-1 
3-3 



Vocational 
Program 

Inaugurated 

A new program for students 
uncertain of their future vocational 
plans will be inaugurated at 
Greenfield Community College in 
January, President Lewis O. 
Turner has announced. 

Funded by the federal govern- 
ment through the New England 
Regional Commission (NERCO), 
the Exploratory Year Program 
will consist of special academic 
courses and counseling for a select 
group of thirty students each 
semester. These students will be 
identified by the director of ad- 
missions and the project coor- 
dinator as being uncertain of 
their vocational goals 



Education 

English 

Hustlers 

National League 

Gunners 

Rickies 

Vets 

Ringers 

YoYo's 

Central League 

Civil Engineering 

Dry Heaves 

Piglets 

MAE 

Organized Whodunits 

American League 

Brett 

Behaviormen 
No Names 
Rileys 
Pipefitters 





Final Volleyball 




3-4 


Standings 




2-4 


as of August 4, 1972 




1-5 


Co-Recreational 


W-L 




Chuggers 


4-1 


6-0 


Bodies 


3-2 


4-3 


Upward 


3-2 


3-3 


Genocides 


1-3 


3-4 


Giants 


1-4 


0-6 






5-1 


Men's 




5-2 


League A 




3-3 


PSD 


8-0 


3-4 


Polymers 


4-4 


0-6 


Upward Bound 


3-5 




Cyborgs 


0-8 


5-2 


League B 




4-2 


APK 


7-1 


3-3 


Pipefitters 


4-4 


2-4 


Bretts Best 


2-6 


2-5 


Bretts Bums 


0-8 



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God 's Plot First In UMass Press Series 



The UMass Press announces the publication this month of the first 
volume of The Commonwealth Series, God's Plot: The Paradoxes <>l 
Puritan Piety, Hi'ing the Autobiography & Journal of Thomas Shephard 
by Michael Mcgiffert. 

The Commonwealth Series, under the general editorship of Winfred 
E.A. Bernhard of the UMass Department of History will present, in 
several volumes, new scholarly editions of classic works concerning the 
cultural development of the Commonwealth and New England. 

Each of the volumes within the Series will be published by the 
University Press, and will be designated by distinctive Commonweal t!> 
Series seal designed especially for the series by Lother Hoffman. 



Please insert one character, space, or punctuation mark per box. 



CLASSIFIED 



FOR SALE 



FOR SALE — Sunfish, recently 
overhauled, cotton sail. Ready 
to sail. Must sell before Friday, 
August 11. $100. II Cliffside, '665 
4271. 

8/8 



1971 Ford Torino Squire Station 
Wagon V 8, power brakes, 
power steering, gray gold — 
3,000 miles. Best Offer. Call 
253 5641. 

8/15 

FOR SALE — Portable Mercury 
stereo, excellent condition, good 
sound, etc. Must sell to pay rent, 
immediately! $90. Negotiable. 
Call Paul 253 2828 between 8:30 
10:00 p.m. 

8/8 

1966 VW Bug. Recently 
overhauled engine. In top 
mechanical condition. 549-6083. 

8/8 

Austin Healey 3000 1962 — good 
cond. Elec. over-drive- 
Michelins-$1,000. Call Don at 
584-8597 between 12 & 4. 

8/3,5 

1970 Honda CL 350, 10,000 miles, 
brand new engine. $550. Call 665- 
3129. 

8/15 
Mimaya/Sekor 500 DTL W/$50 
in accessories — $125. Also 2 
guitar AMP speakers — $30 pr. 
256 6633. 

8/15 

Kowa Six 2-1/4 x 2 1/4 85 mrr. 
with hand grip $195.00. Excel, 
cond. "Poor Man's 

Hasselblad". Call 665 3602 after 
5:00. 

8/1,8/8 

22" Black 8. White TV $45., 21" 
Color TV $150. TELEVISION 
CENTER, 55 North Pleasant St. 
Amherst, 2nd Floor, #253-5100. 

8/15 

IMLM. 

PERSONAL 

FREE Monthly Bargain Price 
List of Coins for the investor, 
beginner or advanced collector. 
Golden Hedge, P.O. Box 207-T, 
Gracie Station, NYC 10028. 

^_^___^ 8/15 

Male seeks 2 Bi F's, 25 plus for 
enduring menage a trois 
oriented to esthetics and 
eroticism, actively creative. 
Stable yet able to partake of the 
delights. P.O. Box 123, Amherst. 

8/15 

RIDE WANTED — To Chicago 
one way or both. Share driving & 
$. Lv. 18 22 Aug. Ret. 5 Sep. 
Leave mess for Max 549 6394 or 
5 1560. 

8/15 
RIDE WANTED — To Kansas 
City or California. Will share 
driving and expenses. Leaving 
anv day around Aug. 18. Call 665 
4009 evenings. 

8/8 



WANTED — Double or Queen 
size mattress and boxspring. 
Call CRIER office, 545 2351. 

8/15 

Driver Needed — to Miami 
Beach in the middle of August. 
Call 549 1532 after 5 p.m. 

8/10 

Female grad student, 

humanities, seeks sapphic 
relationship w/intellectual, 
mature, older woman (3050's). 
Box 120, Amherst. 

8/8 

HFI PWAMTPn 

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS — 
Participate in experiment at 
UMass. Earn $4 for 2 hours 
work. Call Rebecca Warren 
between 4 & 7 p.m. at 256 6456. 

8/8 

FEMALES — earn $1.50 for 
participating in an interesting 
one hour psych, experiment. 
Sign up in Berkshire 323. 

8/8 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

Female roommate wanted 
beginning Sept. 1 for full year at 
Puffton Village. Call 549-0385 
after 6 p.m. on weekdays. 

8/15 

Female roommate wanted — 
Sept. 1. 2 bedroom apt. Brittany 
Manor. Furniture provided 
(except your own bedroom). 
$110. Call 5490711. 

8/8 

FOR RENT 

EFF. AND 2 1/2-rm. apts. turn., 
all utils., parking, pool, 9-mo. 
lease avail, from Sept. 1. Reas. 
rent Amherst Motel opp. 
Zayre's. 

8/15 

Two bdrm apts for immediate 
rental, $185/Mincl utilities. Call 
Resident Mgr 665-4239, if no 
answer 1-786-0500. 

8/15 

NOTICES 



GAYS, wishing to meet others, 
come to 911 CC tonite (Thurs.) at 
7:30 or call Student Homophile 
League 5 0154. 
8/20 

You are most welcomed to come 
every Tuesday at 7 p.m for an 
informal gathering c The 
Christian Science Cv <»ge 
Organization. Hear how '■ th 
and Love unfold good for 
Campus Center 809. 

8/1. 

Opening in September Student 
Activities Center in the former 
Hampden Dining Commor 
Coffeehouse there see' .g 
willing entertainers. If in- 
terested, call 546 0702. 

8/15 



New Vehicle Title Law Effective Sept. 1 



Effective September 1, 1972, 
Massachusetts becomes the 46th 
State in the Nation to have a motor 
vehicle Certificate of Title Law. 
The new law will not only 
streamline the entire registration 
application process but becomes a 
vital factor in apprehending stolen 
cars. 

Insurance companies, brokers, 
agents, dealers, and all Registry of 
Motor Vehicles offices will have a 
supply of the new type of 
registration application forms for 
use on September one. 
WHO IS AFFECTED BY THE 
NEW LAW? 

Owners of newly-acquired motor 
vehicles and trailers who apply for 
a new registration (not a renewal 
of current registration) or who 
transfer a current registration to 
another vehicle on or after Sep- 
tember 1, 1972 must obtain a 
Certificate of Title with the 
following exceptions: 

1. Trailers having gross weight 
of 3,000 pounds or less. 

2. Passenger vehicles 10 or more 
years old. 

3. Special mobile equipment 
exempt from registration (Section 
9, Chapter 90). 

4. Vehicles designed and adapted 
primarily for agricultural, hor- 
ticultural or livestock raising 
operations or for lifting or carrying 
an implement of husbandry. 

5. Vehicles owned by dealers and 
held for sale or demonstration. 

6. Vehicles regularly engaged in 
interstate transportation of per- 



by Sydney Omarr 
Scorpio is exuberant, passionate, 
giving and shrewd. Natives of this 
zodiacal sign are powerful allies and 
dangerous foes. There is seldom anything 
halfway with Scorpio. These persons 
make quick decisions, especially where 
money and security are concerned. There 
seldom is a time when Scorpio is not in 
love. These natives exude personal 
magnetism, are drawn to Pisces, often 
marry Taurus and hold lively discussions 
with Capricorn. Scorpio is aided by Leo in 
fulfilling ambitions. The qualities of 
Scorpio are exemplified by Richard 
Burton, Hedy Lamar and Burt Lancaster. 
• • • 

AIRES (March 21 April 19): 
Recreation favored. Have fun by doing 
what you like- participate in creative 
activities. Romantic interests are ac 
cented. New encounters, exciting con- 
tacts are featured. You will be free and 
happier. 

TAURUS (April 20 May 20): Obtain 
hint from Aires message. Look for 
greater independence of thought, action. 
New deal, added opportunities are in 
offing. Family situation improves. 
Property is more valuable than might be 
imagined. 

GEMINI (May 21 June 20): You now 
can gain new understanding of neighbors, 
relatives. Follow through on inner 
feelings. Teach and learn. Exchange 
ideas. Be flexible. Maintain sense of 
humor. Don't press leave details to 
others. 

CANCER (June 21 July 22): Written 
material plays important role. Get ideas 
on paper. Money is involved. Protect 
resources and assets. Message will 
become increasingly clear. Take time to 
be thorough. Collect and pay debts. 

LEO (July 23 Aug. 22): Go after what 
you need. Scorpio and Aquarius persons 
will strive to aid. Be confident. Stick to 
principles. Adhere to original ideas Don't 
go along with watered-down versions. Be 
yourself then you win. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23 Sept. 22): Areas which 
were dark now receive benefit of greater 
light. Discuss ideas. Gemini is likely to be 
involved. Visit one confined to home, 
hospital. Adhere to principles of Golden 
Rule Then you benefit. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23 Oct. 22): Luxury item 
is featured. Home comforts should be 
given attention. Gift purchase is favored. 
Genuine bargain now available. Don't 
push, force or chide. You get what you 
need through diplomatic maneuver. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 Nov. 21): Be 
selective. Don't jump at first offer. 
Someone is not telling complete story. 
Pill in missing pieces. Look behind the 
scenes. Detect subtle nuances. Pisces 
could play prominent role. Protect self in 
clinches. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 Dec. 21): 
Creative efforts pay dividends. You get 
across to people. Members of opposite sex 
are especially intrigued. Capricorn plays 
important role. Money deal is in offing. 
You could make significant gain. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 Jan 19): 
Decision reached in connection with 
special relationship. You finish rather 
than start-conclusions are reached. 
Money of mate, partner, close associate 
is involved. Be confident. You can sue 
ceed in mission. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 Feb. It): Get 
finger on pulse of public. Time moves. Be 
aware of cycles, trends. Leo could play 
prominent role. Perceive hidden 
meanings. Separate fact from mere 
rumor. Maintain independent stance. 

PISCES (Feb. 19 March 20): Maintain 
steady pace. Avoid any tendency to 
brood Look to future, not past. Minor 
health problem needs attention. You may 
want new pair of shoes. Do something for 
your own morale. Be with one who shares 
interests. 

IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY you 
are a powerhouse. When you decide to do 
something, it usually gets done. If single, 
marriage is on horizon. Married or single, 
you make financial progress this year. 
September should be your most 
significant month of 1972. 

(To find out who's lucky for you in 
money and love, order Sydney Omarr's 
booklet, "Secret Hints for Men and 
Women." Send birthda!e and 75 cents to 
Omarr Astrology Secrets, (name of your 
paper). Box 3240, Grand Central Station, 
New York, NY. 10017.) 

Copyright 1972, Gen. Fea Corp. 



sons or property for which a 
currently effective Certificate of 
Title has been issued in another 
State or Country. 

7. Vehicles owned by non- 
residents of the Commonwealth for 
which a currently effective Cer- 
tificate of Title has been issued in 
another State or Country. 
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TO 
MOTOR VEHICLE OWNERS 
REGISTERING IN THE COM- 
MONWEALTH? 

A. IF YOU PURCHASE A NEW 
VEHICLE FROM A MASS- 
ACHUSETTS DEALER 

1. The owner must register and 
file for a Certificate of Title. 

2. The Dealer must furnish a 
Certificate of Origin to the owner 
which is filed with the application 
for registration and Certificate of 
Title. The Dealer certifies the 
Vehicle Identification Number. 

3. The procedure is then the 
same as heretofore: the ap- 
plication must be endorsed by the 
insurer, signed, and presented to 
the Registry for processing. 

4. The Registry collects the sales 
tax, registration and Title fee and 
gives the owner a 60-day tem- 
porary certificate of registration. 
The permanent certificate of 
registration and the Certificate of 
Title is mailed within 60 days to the 
owner or the first lienholder. 

B. IF YOU PURCHASE A USED 
VEHICLE FROM A MASS- 
ACHUSETTS DEALER 

1. The Dealer furnishes a Bill of 
Sale and the previous Title, if any, 
which are filed with the 
registration and title application. 

2. The owner must fUe for a 
Certificate of Title even though the 
previous Title was endorsed over 
to him. 

3. The procedure is then the 
same as now: the application must 
be presented to the insurer for 
certification, signed and presented 
to the Registry for processing. 

4. The Registry follows the same 
procedure as for new vehicles 
purchased from a Massachusetts 
Dealer. 

C. IF YOU PURCHASE A 



VEHICLE FROM OTHER THAN 
A MASSACHUSETTS DEALER 
OR OUT OF STATE 

1. The new owner must obtain a 
Certificate of Title and register 
even though the vehicle had a 
previous Certificate of Title. 

2. The new owner must present a 
Notarized Bill of Sale from the 
seller giving identification number 
and name of new owner. 

3. If there was a previous Cer- 
tificate of Title, it should be en- 
dorsed over to the new owner and 
filed with the application which is 
then endorsed by the insurer and 
presented to the Registry for 
payment of sales tax, registration 
and title fee. A temporary 60-day 
certificate of registration is issued. 

4. Within 10 days thereafter, the 
owner must present the vehicle for 
inspection of its vehicle iden- 
tification number at any local 
Police Station, State Police 
Barracks or Registry of Motor 
Vehicles office for certification. 
Within 60 days of the application, 
the owner (or first lienholder) will 
receive the Certificate of Title and 
the owner will receive Certificate 
of Registration. 

D. IF YOU TRANSFER 
REGISTRATION OF ONE 
VEHICLE OWNED BY YOU TO 
ANOTHER OF THE SAME CLASS 

1. This is treated as a new 
registration and A, B, or C apply 
and you must obtain a Certificate 
of Title even though your originally 
registered vehicle had a Cer- 
tificate of Title or the newly pur- 
chased vehicle had a Certificate of 
Title endorsed over to you. 
THINGS TO REMEMBER WHEN 
PURCHASING A VEHICLE: 

1. If titled in Massachusetts, ask 
to see the Certificate of Title. 

2. Check description of vehicle 
and vehicle identification number 
with the vehicle. 

3. Arrange to take possession of 
the Certificate of Title when the 
actual sale takes place. 

4. If not titled, see items A, B, C, 
D above. 

5. False statements in ap- 
plications for Certificate of Title or 



forging, altering, etc. carry a fine 
of up to $500 or imprisonment in 
State Prison for not more than five 
years or jail for not more than two 
years. For failure to deliver Title 
or other documents to the 
Registrar within 10 days of time 
required -the Registrar collects a 
penalty of an amount equal to the 
fee required for the transaction. 
Persons convicted of the following 
offenses shall be punished by a fine 



of not more than 
prisonment for not 
months or both, 
another person to 



$100 or im- 

more than 6 

Permitting 

use or have 



possession of a Certificate of Title 
for fraudulent purposes; wilfully 
failing to deliver to Registrar a 
Certificate of Title or an ap- 
plication for a Certificate of Title 
within 10 days after time required 
by law ; wilfully failing to deliver to 
new owner the Certificate of Title 
within 10 days of date of sale. 



ANSWER TO LAST ISSUE'S PUZ 

Crossword Puzzle 



mr^L-K uracDfi ran;?. 



ACROSS 



1 Man's 


nickname 


5 Part of church 


9 Minor item 


11 Blemishes 


13 Near 


14 Baton 


16 Symbol for 


tellurium 


17 Pigpen 


19 Consumed 


20 Wager 


21 Pay attention 


to 


23 Equality 


'24 Wife of Zeus 


25 Showers 


27 Approaches 


29 Beam 


30 Inlet 


31 Join 


33 Liquefies 


35 Entreaty 


36 Guido'shigh 


note 


38 Places 


40 Sum up 


41 Rasp 


43 Posed for 


portrait 


44 Note of scale 


45 Highly sensible 


47 Parent 


(colloq.) 


48 Vast hordes 


50 More vapid 


52 Cook slowly 


53 Paradise 


DOWN 


1 Improved 


2 Pronoun 


3 Spanish plural 


article 


4 Insects 


5 Solar disk 



6 
7 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
15 

18 
20 
22 

24 
26 

28 
31 

32 



Equality 

Spanish for 

"yes" 

Goes in 

Sprint 

Jumps 

Strict 

Bristle 

Teacher-parent 

organization 

(init.) 

Longed for 

Chastises 

Girl's 

name 

Calls 

Brood of 

pheasants 

Before 

Tree of birch 

family (pi.) 

African 

squirrel 



OTr;< UbDII B. 



HRtraH noiin bb 



HQHra enii brer 



33 
34 
35 



Partners 

Part of flower 

Brazilian 

estuary 
37 Young 

boy 
39 Heavenly 

body 



41 
42 

45 

46 
49 

51 



Developed 

Heraldry: 

grafted 

Baker's 

product 

Youngster 

Mountain 

(abbr.) 

French article 




Distr. by United Feature Syndicate, 




-o-.m. if^nyWr 



. 



MM 



•—-.>.. . . 



.•****> 



Page Eight — University of Massachusetts — Tht Critr 






Highlights 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1972 



Plays and Musicals 

AMHERST COLLEGE (Amherst) 
For tickets and information, 542,2277. 

THE THREEPENNY OPERA by 
Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill; Sept. 
8, 9, 10, 11; curtain time 8:30; Sun. 
matinee at 3. Kirby Theatre. 
ARENA CIVIC THFATRE 

(Greenfield) 
For tickets and information, 773 7991. 

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING 
EARNEST by Oscar Wilde; Aug. 3, 4, 

5, 10, 11, 12. 

A MEMORY OF TWO MONDAYS 
by Arthur Miller and BEA, FRANK, 
RICHIE AND JOAN from "Lovers 
and Other Strangers" by Joseph 
Bologna and Renee Taylor; Aug. 17, 
18, 19, 24, 25, 26. 

COMMUNITY MUSICAL '72 
(Amherst) 

For tickets and information contact 
Amherst Regional Junior High 
School. 

ANYTHING GOES; Aug. 11, 12, 13, 
18, 19. High School. 
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE (So. 
Hadley) 
For tickets and information, 538 2406. 

ARMS AND THE MAN by George 
Bernard Shaw; Aug. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; 



curtain time 8:30. 

YOU'RE A GOOD MAN CHARLIE 
BROWN; (Children's production in 
the Amphitheatre, 10:30 a.m.) Aug. 
15, 16, 17, 18, 19. 

PORTABLE CIRCUS: COMEDY IN 
CONCERT t UMass, Campus 
Centei Atd., oculty and students 
seated first). 

THE PORTABLE ^-RCUS, Aug. 9, 
8 p.m. Formed in 1969 at Trinity 
College, Hartford, Conn., a group of 
five performers who, through a 
series of lively comedy sketches, 
examines the effects that television, 
the universal medium, has on us all. 
No props, costumes or sets. Light 
comedy combined with biting satire. 
("Anyone who can get belly laughs 
out of Vassar girls has to be fan 
tastic," Marion Fox, Vassar 
College.) 

SPRINGFIELD FREE THEATRE 
(Forest Park) 
For information, 596 6490. 

THETAMINGOF THE SHREW by 
William Shakespeare; Aug. 25, 26; 
Sept. 1, 2; curtain time 8:30. 
STORROWTON MUSICAL 

THEATRE (West Springfield) 
For tickets and information, 7321105. 



Don't Drink the 

Water 



WASHINGTON — The nations 
air is getting cleaner, but the 
rivers and streams are becoming 
more polluted, the government 
reported Monday. 

The decrease in air pollution 
signifies that the nation is "turning 
the corner" in its efforts to scrub 
the air clean of contaminants, said 
Russell Train, chairman of the 
Council on Environmental Quality. 

Rut he warned that pollutants 
entering major watersheds from 
agricultural and construction 
activities post a serious threat to 
efforts to purify the nation's 
streams and rivers. 

"Until we can deal with these 
effectively, we will not be able to 
overcome the water-pollution 
problem," Train said. 

He spoke after presenting to 
President Nixon the third annual 
report on the environment by the 
council which Train heads. 

The report estimated the cost to 
improve the environment during 
the 1970s would hit a cumulative 
total of $287 billion for the decade 
or about $100 per person per year. 

Costs were running about $10 
billion a year in 1970 and are ex- 
pected to hit $33 billion a year by 



1980. 

Nixon, in an accompanying 
message to Congress chided the 
legislators for failing to take 
prompt action on some 20 ad- 
ministration legislative proposals 
to clean up the environment. 

"The time for deliberation has 
passed," Nixon said. "It is now 
time for action." 

Although the report declared 
that even Yellowstone National 
Park "now has air that is con- 
taminated by auto exhaust 
fumes," a study monitoring 
pollutants in 82 metropolitan areas 
showed a 16.9 per cent decrease in 
contamination. 

One significant finding was that 
"communities under 100,000 
population suffer problems almost 
as severe as those in large cities." 

The nationwide estimate 
reported that emissions of carbon 
monoxide dropped 4.5 per cent 
during the year, and particulates 
7.4 per cent, primarily through 
controls applied to smoke stacks. 

The water pollution index of 
major watersheds disclosed there 
were 76,299 miles of polluted 
waterways in 1971, an increase of 
5,435 over 1970. 



News In Brief 



CAMPAIGN '72 

The settlement of credentials 
disputes provides a lively prelude 
for the Democratic National 
Committee's Tuesday meeting to 
nominate Sargent Shriver for the 
vice presidency. 

The Democratic National 
Committee has just undergone a 
major overhaul to make it much 
more broadly representative of the 
party membership. 

Black labor unionists plan an 
end-run around national labor 
leaders' opposition to Democratic 
presidential nominee George 
McGovern. 

McGovern tries to enlist blue- 
collar votes by picturing President 
Nixon as "the enemy of the 
American workers." 



INDOCHINA 

Government militiamen beat off 
waves of enemy infantry in nor- 
thern South Vietnam while hard 
fighting erupts in Cambodia. 

The U.S. Army acts to halt 
heroin smuggling at its Long Binh 
military stockade after 
discovering 11 prisoners had used 
the drug. 



INTERNATIONAL 

Amid an easing of tensions 
among the big powers, delegates 
from 70 nations assemble in 
Guyana to map the future role of 
nonaligned countries. 



The U.S. 6th Fleet is coming 
back to Villefranche after a trial 
separation of eight months. 



WOMEN SOLDIERS 

The Army plans to double the 
number of women soldiers by 1978 
and give them almost any type of 
job short of actual combat roles. 



MEDICINE 

A government doctor says he 
was instructed not to treat syphilis 
victims involved in a federal ex- 
periment. He says when he insisted 
on treating them they apparently 
were told not to accept treatment. 



Physicians describe Wesley 
Jones as a medical rarity: his 
internal organs are on the wrong 
side of his body. 



THE LIBERACE SHOW, runs the 
week of Aug. 14. 

1776, runs the week of Aug. 21. 

MAN OF LA MANCHA, runs the 
week of Aug. 28. 

UNIVERSITY OF 

MASSACHUSETTS (Amherst) 
For tickets and information, 545-2579. 

THE GLASS MENAGERIE by 
Tennessee Williams; Bartlett Aud.; 
Aug. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13; curtain time 
8:30. 

The University also has plans for 
several children's shows during the 
summer. 

WILLIAMSTOWN SUMMER 
THEATRE ( Williamstown) 
For tickets and information, 458-8146. 

THE COUNTRY GIRL by Clifford 
Odets, Aug. 8-12. 

PROBABLY REPEAT OF MOST 
POPULAR PLAY; Aug. 15-19. 

AN UNANNOUNCED MUSICAL; 
Aug. 22 26. 



Movies 



UMASS SUMMER FILM PROGRAM 

(in Campus Center Aud. unless 
otherwise indicated; students seated 
first). 



AUG. 8: A Walk in the Spring Rain 
at 7. Baby the Rain Must Fall at 9. 

AUG. 15: Splendor in the Grass at 
7. Ship of Fools at 9. 

Music 

AMHERST FOLKLORE CENTRE 

(Spring St., just off Amherst com 
mon). 

Open during July and Aug., Thurs.- 
Sat., 8 p.m. to midnight. Folk, blues, 
rock music (live). Organic snacks. 
Admission for top performers. Come 
in anytime to audition. 

TANGLEWOOD 
August 11 

7:00 p.m. Weekend Prelude Gina 
Bachauer. 

9:00 p.m. Colin Davis Wagner: 
Wesendonck Songs - Prelude and 
Liebes tod from "Tristan und Isolde". 
Jessye Norman Verdi: Four Sacred 
Pieces. Tanglewood Festival Chorus, 
John Oliver, Director. 
August 12 
10:30 a.m. Open Rehearsal 

8:30 p.m. Colin Davis Berlioz: 
Overture "Les Francs-Juges" - 
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4. 
Gina Bachauer Brahms: Symphony 
No. 3. 



August 13 

2:30 p.m. Colin Davis Beethoven: 
Symphony No. 3 "Eroica" Berlioz: 
Te Deum. Richard Lewis. 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John 
Oliver, Director. 
August 18 

7:00 p.m. Weekend Prelude - Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players 
Woodwind Quintet with Alexis 
Weissenberg. 

9:00 p.m. Seiji Ozawa 
Melodien for Orchestra 
Piano Concerto No. 1. 



Ligeti: 

Chopin: 

Alexis 



Weissenberg Bartok: Miraculous 

Mandarin. 

August 19 

10:30 a.m. Open Rehearsal 
8:30 p.m. Michael Tilson Thomas 

Mozart: Paris Symphony Messiaen: 

Et exspecto resurrectionem mor 

tuorum Brahms: Piano Concerto 

No. 2. Misha Dichter. 

August 20 

Ozawa Mahler: 
Deborah O'Brien, 
Susan Clickner, 
John Alexander, 

William Dooley, Saverio Barbieri, St. 

Paul's School Boy Choir, Theodore 

Marier, Condcutor, Tanglewood 

Festival Chorus, John Oliver, 

Director. 



2:30 p.m. Seiji 
Symphony No. 8. 
Linda Phillips, 
Eunice Alberts, 



F.T.C. Announces Disposition of 5 
Insurance Company Investigations 



In disposition of alleged 
violations of the Fair Credit 
Reporting Act, the Federal Trade 
Commission accepted Assurances 
of Voluntary Compliance from five 
of the nation's major life insurance 
companies. The five companies 
are: 

•Berkshire Life Insurance 
Company, Pittsfield, Mass. 

♦Home Life Insurance Company, 
New York, N.Y. 

*New York Life Insurance 
Company, New York, N.Y. 

♦Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Insurance Company, Jackson, 
Miss. 

•Teachers Insurance and An- 
nuity Association, New York, N.Y. 

When an individual applies for 
insurance, the company to which 
he has applied, as a part of its 
underwriting process, often will 
order an investigation to deter- 
mine the applicant's morals, 
reputation, personal charac- 
teristics and mode of living. The 
five insurance companies under 
investigation by the Commission 
order in excess of 400,000 such 
reports annually. In April, 1971, the 
use and preparation of these 
reports came under Federal 
regulation when the Fair Credit 
Reporting Act became effective. 
These five matters are the first 
involving alleged violations of this 
Act on the part of the users of 
consumer reports. 

The Commission's action was 



precipitated by a survey of 100 life 
insurance companies which ac- 
count for approximately 90 per 
cent of the life insurance sold in the 
United States. The survey revealed 
that more than 40 per cent of the 
industry was in substantial non- 
compliance with the investigative 
reporting notification 
requirements of the Act. 

The five companies were alleged 
to be in violation of Section 606(a) 
of the Act which the Commission 
found requires users of "in- 
vestigative consumer reports" to 
clearly and accurately disclose to 
each consumer who will be in- 
vestigated, all of the following: 

*An "investigative consumer 
report'' may be prepared, using 
the term, "investigative consumer 
report"; 

*The report will include in- 
formation as to the consumer's 
character, general reputation, 
personal characteristics and mode 
of living, whichever is applicable; 

*The information for an "in- 
vestigative consumer report" will 
be obtained through personal in- 
terviews with friends, neighbors 
and associates of the subject of the 
report; and 

*Upon written request, a com- 
plete and accurate disclosure of 
the "nature and scope" of the 
"investigative consumer report" 
will be provided. 

Moreover, these items must be 
presented clearly in a disclosure 



20 Mailboxes In 15 Years 



KENNETT, Mo. — Ike J. Mungle 
has had 20 mailboxes destroyed by 
vandals over the last 15 years, but 
now he thinks he's got his problem 
solved. 



The southeast Missouri farmer 
carries his mailbox from his house 
each morning to the road just 
about the time the mail is 
delivered. 

He has a hoe handle attached to 
the mailbox and he slides the 
bottom of it into a pipe in the 
ground. After the mail arrives, 
Mungle takes the box back to the 
house a quarter mile away. 

"They won't leave my mailbox 
alone," Mungle said, explaining 
that each time he puts a new one up 
it gets damaged twice as fast as the 
previous one. He once lost two in 
one week. 

His mailboxes have been blown 
apart by a firecracker, beaten with 
a hammer, riddled by a shotgun 
and once he found a dead dog 
stuffed in the box. 

Mungle, of Route 2, Kennett, said 
he believes young people regard 
his mailbox as a target for pranks 
with each pew generation taking 
up the challenge. 



Postal authorities nave in- 
vestigated but to no avail. They say salaries ranged 
they cannot bring the mail all the $1,129 per month 



statement and must not be masked 
or obscured by language unrelated 
to these notification requirements. 
It is expected that today's action 
by the Commission will provide 
sufficient impetus to bring about 
industry-wide compliance with this 
notification requirement of the 
Fair Credit Reporting Act. 

Poor Pay 
For Grads 

A survey released last week 
confirmed what most young people 
already knew : The job situation for 
recent college graduates is far 
from rosy. 

The survey— conducted by the 
College Placement Council, which- 
provides services for colleges and 
employers to help students plan 
their careers and em- 
ployment—showed that starting 
salaries for June gradates, despite 
continuing inflationary trends, 
rose only about 2 per cent over last 
year's levels. This contrasts with 
the 5 to 7 per cent annual increases 
that were common in the late 
1%0's. 

Other findings: 

*The top average starting 
salaries for men and women in the 
same fields usually were not equal. 
For example, male acconting 
graduates averaged $854 per 
month, female $829. 

*At the master's degree level, 
the most openings and the highest 
average salaries were for those in 
business administration. Starting 
from $1,057 to 



way to Mungle's house because 
rules prevent it. 

"I've bought my last mailbox," 
Mungle told a reporter as he 
carried the portable box on his 
shoulder. "If they do this one in, 
I'm just going to start going into 
town. I'll rent a city post office box 
before I let them tear up another 
one." 



*At the 
engineers 



Ph.D. level, electrical 
received the highest 
starting salaries— an average of 
$1,439 per month, up 3.7 per cent 
from last year. 

♦The largest salary increase for 
women was in com- 
munications—up 7.6 per cent to 
$577— but the number of graduates 
in the field was small. 



Bandura Elected 



Dr. Albert Bandura, a luminary Iowa, 
in the field of learning and per- At Stanford, Bandura has 
sonality research, has been achieved widespread recognition 
selected as the 82nd President- as an authority on childhood 
elect of the American aggression and the influences of 
Psychological Association. media on learning and develop- 

Bandura is professor of ment. His teaching has centered on 
psychology at Stanford University, social learning theory and its 
where he has taught and conducted applications to personality 
research since 1952. He became a development, psychopathology, 
member of APA in 1958 and was psychotherapy, and social change, 
elected a Fellow six years later. Bandura attained public 

At 46, Bandura is one of the prominence in 1961 when he ap- 
youngest president-elects in the peared before a Senate committee 
history of APA. Canadian born, probing the effects of televised 
Bandura earned his B.A. in 1949 at violence on children. His testimony 
the University of British Columbia, helped focus the public eye, for the 
He went on to get his M.A. degree first time, on television as a 
and doctorate at the University of possible determinant of behavior. 




Patriots prepare for Kagle's game. ( Photo by Larry Gold ) 




University of Massachusetts 
August 10, 1972 Volume 1, Issue 13 

"The Threshold Of A Relationship" 



Kennedy Suit 
Opposes 
Nixon Veto 



WASHINGTON — Sen. Edward 
M. Kennedy, D-Mass., filed suit in 
U.S. District Court today 
challenging President Nixon's 
pocket veto of a federal health bill 
in December 1970. 

The complaint asks the court to 
invalidate the pocket veto, exer- 
cised during a four-day Christmas 
recess of Congress. It also asks 
that the defendants, Arthur F. 
Sampson, head of the General 
services Administration, and 
Thomas M. Jones, White House 
2hief of records, be directed to 
:arry out their responsibility to 
publish the bill as part of the of- 
ficial laws of the United States. 

The bill, called the Family 
Practice of Medicine Act, 
authorized a $225-million program 
of federal grant to hospitals and 
medical schools to train family 
doctors. It was passed by the 
Senate by a 64-1 vote and by the 
House, 346-2, and sent to the 
President in mid-December 1970. 

Under Article 1, Section 7, of the 
Constitution, the president must 
either sign or veto a bill within 10 
days or it becomes law without his 
signature, unless Congress is 
adjourned at the end of the 10-day 
period in which case it does not 
become law and is referred to as a 
"pocket veto . 

In the case of the 1970 medical 
bill, the 10-day period expired on 
Dec. 25, 1970, while Congress was in 
a four-day Christmas recess. 

Kennedy's suit asks the court to 
hold that the bill became law Dec. 
25, 1970. 

Kennedy called Nixon's action a 
"transparent but unconstitutional 
attempt to prevent an em- 
barrassing vote by Congress to 
override a regular veto, and 
another example in the long line of 
action by the Administration in 
derogation of the powers of 
Congress under the Constitution." 

Kennedy contended the pocket 
veto provision was intended to 
apply only to circumstances in- 
volving final adjournment of a 
session of Congress, otherwise 
Congress could not even recess 
for a weekend without risking a 
pocket veto of legislation awaiting 
a presidential signature. 




Gary Stewart as Tom in a scene from the IMass Summer Theatre 
production of "The Glass Menagerie" by Tennessee Williams. The 
production will run tonight through Sunday at 8:30 p.m. in air- 
conditioned Rartlett Auditorium. Tickets available at Bartlett Box 
Office or by calling 545-257!). 



Patriots Trim 
Roster To 61 



By ED BRYANT 

Faced with the necessity of 
reducing their squad to sixty-one 
men, the New England Patriots 
placed seven players on waivers 
Tuesday, and put two on the in 
jured waiver list. These moves 
were made in order to comply with 
a National Football League role 
limiting the number of players who 
can be kept on the roster after 
August 8. This required roster 
trimming is the first in a series 
going from 60 to 49, 44, and finally 
40 for the regular season. 

The biggest name released is 
that of Mike Taliaferro. General 
Manager Upton Bell has tried all 
winter and spring to trade 
Taliaferro; he will now bring the 
team $100 in payment. He was the 
only veteran let go at this time. 

Also released were linebackers 
Ted Moody and Roosevelt Thomas, 
defensive end Otis McDaniel, 
flanker Ed Rideout, guard Steve 
Beyrle, and punter John Benien. 
Benien, obtained a week ago from 
Detroit, was to be the answer to the 
Patriots' punting problems. He 
wasn't any kind of answer. 

His punts travelled, as was 
expected, but somewhere along the 
line he has lost his ability to hang 
them. Famed in college for the 
height of his kicks, he was booting 
line drives in the five days he was 
with the Pats. 

The Patriots placed rookies Bo 
Renfrow and Alan Durkovic on 
injured waivers. Durkovic, and 
offensive tackle, is from Boston 
University. Renfrow, a former 
sparring partner for Bob Foster 
and Muhammed Ali, did not attend 
college, but was discovered on a 
Washington playground by Rickie 
Harris. Bo is a defensive lineman 
who is just learning the game. 

Bill Griffin and Willie Bogan, 
obtained last week from Miami 
and Baltimore, respectively, 
reported to camp. Griffin is being 
worked at offensive tackle, while 
Bogan, the first Rhodes Scholar 
ever to play for the Patriots, is 
playing safety. 

Game plan preparations are 
being made this week for Satur- 
day's game with the Philadelphia 
Eagles in Philadelphia. The 
Eagles, one of the worst teams in 
football for about half a season last 
year, improved considerably when 
Ed Khayat took over as Coach. 
Khayat made news when he made 
the players get haircuts, and made 
a few enemies for himself among 
his players in the process. Tim 
Roosovich, the middle-linebacker 
who specialized in setting himself 
on fire, was one of those. Rossovich 
has been traded to San Diego. 

This year's team will feature two 
new players on offense, both of 
whom bring to mind the name of 
Jim Plunkett. The first is quar- 
terback John Reaves, who last 
year broke Plunkett's NCAA 
career record for Total Yardage 
after his teammates lay down on 
defense in order to get the ball for 
Reaves, thus tainting three years 
worth of a pretty good college 
career. Reaves battles incumbents 
Pete Liske and Rick Arrington for 
the job. It should be his soon. 

The new fullback in Philadelphia 
is Jim Nance, a name that should 



be familiar. Nance was let go by 
the Patriots because Jim Plunkett 
has shown he can be what he was 
expected to be, to wit, a quar- 
terback who can provide an ex- 
plosive passing attack. Jim Nance 
as a passcatcher has always looked 
as though he expects the ball to 
explode if caught. The Pats need 
running backs who can catch, so 
Nance is now an Eagle. 

In other important news, the 
New England's Patriots First 
Annual Ping-Pong Tournament, a 
much ballyhoed affair which can 
only be described as a white 
elephant, is underway. Run by Nail 
Katz (a former flunkie for Jerry 
Perenchio) and Chris Sullivan (a 
flunkie), the Tournament was 
billed as possibly one of the two or 
three biggest events in the history 
of Ping-Pong. Players, coaches, 
staff, and the press were invited to 
participate. For a time, it ap- 
peared as though the tournament 
would force postponement of the 
football season. All the build-up 
turned out to be nocturnal 
whistling in E Flat. 

Only twelve players signed up 
for the tournament. The draw was 
set up so as to end in a messy, 
three-way round robin. The Miami 
Beach Convention Hall, the 
original site of the Tournament, 
was rented to a rival group, the 
Republican National Committee. 
As a result, the tournament had to 
be moved to the second floor 
lounge of James House, a poor 
auditorium for spectator sports. 
Since the public is not invited, the 
crowds have naturally been 
disappointing. 

Charlie Gogolak, a former 
Princeton great with an unusual 
style (he kicks the ball with his 
instep), has advanced to the finals. 
The other two semi-final matches 
have yet to be played. In perhaps 
the most dramatic match of the 
tournament, Jack Maitland rallied 
after losing the first game to take 
his match with Jim Plunkett. The 
score of the second game was 26-24. 
Maitland never lost his composure. 

Senate Votes 
Gun Sale Ban 

WASIIINGTON-The Senate 
passed a bill Wednesday 
prohibiting the sale of easily 
concealable handguns. The vote 
was 68 to 25. 

The chief target of the bill, which 
now goes to the House, is the kind 
of snub-nosed, cheap, lightweight 
handgun commonly railed 
Saturday night sepcials. 

Sen. Birch Bayh. D-Ind.. the 
bill's sponsor, said it would "take 
out of the market place the 
weapons used most frequency by 
criminals. " 

He estimated it would halt the 
sale of about one million of the 2- 
1/2 million pistols and revolvers 
sold each year in this country. 

The bill, passed after three days 
of debate during which tougher 
controls ere rejected, had 
languished in the Senate until the 
attempted assassination on May 15 
of Alabama Gov. George C. 
Wallace. 



Dancers Take Over Commons On Tuesdays 



By BRUCE J. DORA 

It's Tuesday afternoon, classes 
are done, beautiful weather, just 
great-but what to do? I guess that I 
could go to Puffer's Pond but it is a 
little chilly so I guess I'll take walk 
downtown. I get down there and sit 
on the green-across-from me is 
music and dancing-far out. 

The Five-College Folk Dance 
Group (for lack of a better name) 
has been around this area for 
somewhere between 15 and 30 
years according to Ms. Kate 
Ashenden. Kate explained, "We 
are an informal group with no real 
leader-we all own the records and 
teach each other. Some of us have 
been to dance workshops and four 



belong to a semi-professional Folk 
Dance group in New Haven, Barb 
Lobb, Steve Kauch, Ed King and 
myself." Kate, a senior at 
Greenfield High School, has been 



into folk dance nearly all her life 
and with others in this group does 
performances for local groups. 

Carol Wogrin, 18, an Amherst 
resident told us besides the 



Just What Was That Noise ? 



SYRACUSE. N.Y. <AP) — 
Patricia Williams told police 
Wednesday she heard a noise 
under her husband's bed and threw 
a shoe at what she thought was a 
cat. Instead, out popped a 



burgular. 

"What are you doing here?" 
Mrs. Williams said she asked. 

"I'm looking for my brother," 
the intruder replied, and then he 
ran from the home. 



Tuesday 2:30 dances on the green, 
"We dance Fridays outside of the 
dining commons at Southwest (in 
case of rain in Prince House) at 
7:30 p.m. during the summer. And 
at mid-September we dance at 
Davis Center at Smith. We instruct 
you and we are always looking for 
new faces. We ask for a quarter 
donation which is used to buy new 
equipment and records. Our age 
bracket runs from junior high to 
graduate students and all of us 
seem to have fun." 

"The dances that are done are 
international and anyone who 
wishes can request a dance to be 
done or join us in our dances," Ms. 
Wogrin concluded. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1972 



THURSDAY. AUGUST 10. 1972 



University of Massachusetl. 



>r - Page Three 



Page Two — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer Session 1972, 
University of Massachusetts. Offices are located in the Campus 
Center, Student Activities Area, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely respons.ble for 
the contents. No copy is censored by the administration before 
Publication. Represented for national advertising by National 
Educational Advertising Services, Inc. 



Art Buchwald 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
CONTINUITY DIRECTOR 
NEWS STAFF 



James E. Gold 

Jack Koch 

Karin Ruckhaus, Lisa Castillo, 

Gil Salk, Brenda Furtak 

PERFORMING ARTS EDITOR „ _. C4 ^hmirffrarl Na^h 

PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Gold, Steve Schmidt, Carl Nasn 

| OCCASIONAL EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Shelly Karp 

I SUMMER SPORTS EDITOR Ed Bryant 

\ The Threshold of a relationship. 



ITT Backs Anderson 



WASHINGTON -I am happy to 
report that Jack Anderson was not 
all alone during the greatest crisis 
of his career, when he falsely 
accused Sen. Thomas Eagleton of 
being cited for traffic violations 
while under the influence of. 

I have just received the tapes of 
the first call Anderson received 
after the story broke that he had no 
proof to back up the charges. It 
was from his old friend, ITT lob- 
byist Dita Beard. 

"Jack," she said, "I just wanted 



Camp 



m us Carousel 

Youth Not Together- 
Handicaps Discouraged 



by Tony Granite 

ONE OF THE LIVELIER 

CAMPUS NEWSPAPERS in these 

USA is the Indiana Daily Student. 

Here is some recent evidence 

• * * * 

COVERAGE OF THE 

DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL 
CONVENTION in Miami by 
opinion page editor Russ Kennedy 
concentrated on delegates under 

30. 

One thing he found out was that 
youth are not as together on issues 
as the press assumes. And there is 
not an issue exclusively for youth 
in the Democratic campaign - ttie 
war and ecology are shared by 

oldsters, as well. 

* * * * 

HEADLINE OF THE WEEK 

appeared over an ids feature on 
solar eclipse: "Darkness At 

Noon." 

* » * * 



SEGREGATED LANGUAGE is 

being taught at IU in the form of a 
course labeled, "Lit 341 (Black 
English)." 

Designed for students of 
language and sociology, L341 
"should be helpful to people who 
are now teaching or will be 
teaching in inner-city school 
systems." 

" Instructor Beverly Huntsman 
says that English spoken by blacks 
is "a legitimate, rule-governed 
language," the same as so-called 

formal English spoken by educated 

whites." 

* * » * 



PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED 
\RK \ MINORITY, TOO, ac 
cording to an ids feature by Beth 
Wood 

Her lead reads: "We have many 
terms to describe the hatred and 
prejudice directed toward certain 
oppressed minorities, the current 
favorites being racism and sexism. 
But we don't even have a word in 
our language for the age-old 
prejudice toward physically 
handicapped people. Truly a 
mistreated minority, the han- 
dicapped have found themselves 
shunned and ignored by nearly 
every other human group." 

And she points out that IU, 
•while knocking itself out making 
token efforts to recruit other 
minorities, is actua ly 

discouraging the physically 
handicapped" for enrolling. 



Such discouragements take the 
form of advising the handicapped 
to enroll in such universities as 
Missouri and Illinois which have 
"much more advanced facilities" 
for the handicapped. 



At IU, only two buildings on 
campus are equipped with ramps 
for wheelchair students. Ad- 
ministrators point out that each 
ramp costs from $20 to $50. 



you to know that everyone here at 
ITT is rooting for you." 

"It's nice of you to call,' Jack 
said. "You know, it was all a 
terrible mistake." 

"Of course, it was a terrible 
mistake. I was saying to Hal 
Geneen yesterday, 'Hal, I cant 
believe Jack would knowingly do 
something like this. He must have 
been under great pressure.' Hal 
agreed and said, it broke my heart 
when I read about it. I didn't sleep 
a wink all night."' 

"Geneen said that?" Anderson 

"I give you my word. He told me 
to call you and say that everyone in 
the ITT organization, including the 
Hartford Fire Insurance Co., is 
hoping you'll come out of this okay. 
He didn't talk to Atty. Gen. 
Kleindienst, but he is sure he feels 
the same way." 

"Gosh, that's really nice of all of 

you." 

"What are friends for? Hal 
wants to know if you'd like the 
company plane to go away for a 
while." 

"No, I'm going to stay here in 
Washington and keep 

apologizing." 

"What about a good hospital in 
Denver where you could rest up?" 

"I'll take the name, but I doubt if 
I'll need it." 



"Well, that makes sense," Dita 
siad. "Anyone would have done the 
same thing in your shoes. By the 
way, could you use some shoes? 
ITT makes nice shoes." 

"I don't need anything, Dita. 
Your call is enough as far as I'm 
concerned." 

"Geneen's been getting a lot of 
calls from the press asking what he 
thinks of Anderson now, and you 
know what he's been saying? He's 
been saying that his opinion of you 
is the same as it was before the 
Eagleton story." 

"That's what I call a pal," An- 
derson said. 

"Would you 'ike to go to the 
Kentucky Deri next year, when 
this whole thing blows over?" Dita 
asked. 



But there's one thing that IU will 
do, says Writer Wood. The 
registrar will accept applications 
for classes spaced far enough 
apart for the handicapped to reach 
them on time, and for classes 
situated on the first floor of 
classroom buildings. 

"But if classes are full, it's 
tough ." 



By Berry 




"Would you like to go to San 
Diego and stay at one of our new 
Sheraton hotels?" 

"It would be nice, but I'd better 
stay here for the moment." 

"Well, could we lend you our 
paper shredder? You might want 
to destroy the photostats of 
Eagleton's drunk-driving tickets." 

"There are no photostats of 
Eagleton's tickets," Anderson said 
sadly. 

"No photostats? Everyone here 
said there had to be photostats or 
you wouldn't have gone with the 
story," Dita said. 

"It wasn't my fault," Anderson 
said. "I had this source, a former 
high official in Missouri, and he 
told me he had seen them, and I 
was afraid of being scooped 
because I knew a lot of reporters 
were on the same story. So I broke 
it." 




"It sounds good," Anderson said. 
"Let me think about it." 

"The thing to remember, Jack, 
is that these things are forgotten in 
no time. It may be a big story 
today, but tomorrow people will be 
wrapping fish in it. Don't get 
discouraged, and keep in mind that 
the entire ITT group, including 
those companies the Justice 
Department is unfairly forcing us 
to divest, is behind you 1,000%." 

"I don't know what to say," 
Anderkon said, sobbing. 

"Don't say anything. Jack. It's 
the least we can do after all you've 
done for us." 

Copyright 1972. Los Angeles 
Times 



-Oh — Oli I SEE — 1m ml U> my in — CASH. 



Transcendental Meditation and You 



\\\ l'l{ \\ Kl\ SIIKIY AST.W A 

The Western scientific approach 
to knowledge is based on the non- 
variability of the objective means of 
observation. The Eastern approach 
to knowledge is based on the non- 
variability of the subjective means of 
observation. 

Speaking for the East, we know 
there is a level of consciousness 
called -ritam bhara pragyan", 
which is non-variable in its nature 
and. therefore, on that level the 
knowledge of an object never 
changes, remaining authentic and 
truly scientific for all time. 

Western science has continued to 
contribute to the advancement of 
civilization, because good minds in 
the West have persistently applied 
the objective methodology of gaining 
knowledge; whereas Eastern 
civilization has not continued to 
contribute to the advancement of 
civilization, because good minds in 
the East have not persistently ap- 
plied the subjective methodology of 
gaining knowledge. 

Now the teaching of Tran- 
scendental Meditation--in the 
structure of the Science of Creative 
Intelligence -enriches the knowledge 
of the West and revives the 
knowledge of the East and will give 
the benefit of both methodologies to 
every man in the world. The Science 
of Creative Intelligence is the 
glorious meeting ground for the 
Eastern and Western ideals of 
gaining knowledge. All men 
everywhere will enjoy the highest 



ideal of life in the fullness of all 
glories, material and spiritual." 
These are the words of Maharishi Mahesh 
Yogi, speaking at UMass last summer at the 
Svmposium on the Science of Creative In- 
telligence (SCI). Meeting with Maharishi 
last summer were great scientists and 
experts from all fields of knowledge, in- 
cluding Buckminster Fuller, Roman 
Vishniac and Major General Franklin 
Davis. Last week at MIT in Cambridge a 
similar symposium on the Science of 
Creative Intelligence was conducted by 
Maharishi. Participants included doctors 
and psychiatrists, astronaut Rusty Sch- 
weicart' talking about "inner space", and 
many presentations about the application of 
the practical aspect of SCI. Transcendental 
Meditation. Contributions of symposium 
participants were evaluated from the five 
basic premises of the Science of Creative 
Intelligence: Creative Intelligence can be 
logicallv explained, directly experience, 
scientifically verified, artistically ac- 
tualized, fully unfolded and applied in all 
fields of knowledge and activity. 

Maharishi describes SCI as "systematic 
inquirv into the source of all knowledge in 
order to provide a unifying or holistic basis 
for all branches of learning". The practice 
of transcendental meditation brings into 
conscious awareness the creative in- 
telligence lying latent in everyone. 

The actual experiences of improved 
creative faculties and a generally, "hap- 
pier, more fulfilled life" is scientifically 
verifiable. The principles at work behind 
meditation are essentials of natural law-- 
"the same principle that brings seed to 
flower". Maharishi says, "to enjoy the fruit 
of the tree, first you must water the root." 



TM. as it is now being taught to thousands 
of people every month who want to enjoy life 
more, is a simple, natural technique which 
allows the conscious mind systematically to 
experience finer states of mental activity 
until it "transcends" the finest state of 
activity and arrives at the source of thought, 
or pure field of creative intelligence. It is a 
process of direct experience rather than one 
of intellectural analysis. Those practicing 
the technique report increased energy and 
efficiency, greater alertness and clarity of 
thinking, improved physical health, and 
greater harmony in personal relationships. 
They experience greater enjoyment and 
achievement in daily life and accumulate 
less stress and strain. TM is a technique of 
integration of life. Through regular prac- 
t ice, 15-20 minutes twice a day, every aspect 
of life is harmonized with every other. 
Everyone who can think can easily learn 
TM. as it does not involve any un- 
derstanding for the practice to be effective. 

The Science of Creative Intelligence, 
which studies the theoretical and applied 
values of TM in (he various fields of 
knowledge and activity, has gained an 
accredited status at several colleges and 
universities in the U.S. and Canada. It has 
hem included in the curriculum at the 
Universities of Colorado and Wisconsin, 
Stanford University, Sacramento State 
College. Humboldt State College, Goddard 
College, and York University in Toronto, 
and is currently being scheduled at several 
other campuses. Because this course offers 
an opportunity for personal verification of 
the existence and values of creative in- 
telligence on the level of direct experience, it 
is unique in the field of education today. 



In the past few months many articles have 
appeared around the world on exciting 
findings related to the practice of TM. The 
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN (Feb., 1972) 
reported that findings bv Dr. Keith Wallace 
and Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical 
School indicate and objectively verify that 
20 min. of TM produces a deep state of rest 
and accompanied by mental alertness that 
far exceeds the rest gained by several hours 
of deep sleep, as measured by oxygen 
consumption, cardiac output and other 
measures of metabolic activity. Other 
magazines, including TODAY'S HEALTH 
PSYCHOLOGY TODAY, THE MENSA 
JOURNAL, and many others have endorsed 
TM as the most effective technique yet 
discovered to combat stress and strain and 
relieve the symptoms of hypertension and 
stress-related diseases. 

Despite the intellectual and scientific 
interest that has been generated, the real 
value of TM lies in its very genuine con- 
tributions to improving the quality of human 
life. Individuals have experience very 
positive changes as a result of it, and these 
changes are what has caused the Students 
International Mediation Society, the 
organization that teaches Transcendenta 
Meditation, to grow from 15 students at 
UCLA to 160.000 students across the nation 
in 1972. They are reason enough for con 
sidering TM seriously as a possible solution 
to the twentieth century human crisis, a 
positive solution that holds the possibility oi 
enriching every aspect of life today 

Members of the Amherst Community can 
look forward to an expanding program o 
lectures and personal instruction on TM "l 
the fall and continuing through the year. 




//=- T#* M7 f/TS h/f/t/S iT 



SoAM?6o&y „ 



Toro, Earth's Second Moon, 
Could Nullify Horoscopes 



SA\ DIEGO - The earth's "second moon," a 
planetoid named Toro which may hold the key to the 
evolution of the solar system, passed within 12.6 
million miles of the earth Tuesday, the closest it has 
heen in nearly a century. 

A scientist said the discovery of Toro could mean 
horoscopes are "out of phase". 

Toro. which was spotted last Octover by Nobel 
laureate Hannes Alfven. is too small and distant to be 
seen with low-power telescopes. It is a mile and a half 
long anc a mile wide 

But the planetoid was observed by the high- 
powered telescopes of observatories. The Goldstone 
Radio observatory in the Mojave Desert bounced a 
radio signal off it. 



Toro alternates as a moon of earth and then of 
Venus For a few centuries prior to 1580 it was under 
influence of Venus. 

From AD. 1580 to 2200. it has been and will be 
locked in on earth." Gustav Arrhenius of the 
University of California said. "Then the governing 
planet will become Venus again in 2200, the earth 
again in 2350. Venus again in 2800." 

Once the tiny Toro was thought of as a piece of 
interplanetary debris with a particularly eccentric 
orbit around the sun. Its status was upgraded to 
planetoid when computers determined that Toro was 
bounced back and forth between the gravitational 
fields of the two planets. 



WFCR Broadcasts 
'Woman's Hour' 

In the United States, it is estimated that one million abortions are in- 
duced annually. In Massachusetts, the most conservative estimate places 
the number of women who seek abortions at 20,000 per year. In 1970, only 
2500 to 3000 abortions were performed legally in the Commonwealth, 
forcing at least 17.000 women to evade Massachusetts law. 

Women, doctors, problem pregnancy counsellors, legislators, and 
others analyze this issue this month on THE WOMAN'S HOUR on WFCR 
88.5 FM. Amherst's public, non-profit, non-commercial radio station. 

Although the month of August is specializing in the abortion question, 
past shows have offered the listening audience a unique insight into 
historical and contemporary issues affecting the lives of women today. 
These shows, done in magazine format, have included such con- 
troversial contemporary topics as the woman's movement and the 
polaritv of "mothering" and "fathering", historical topics such as 
women in the labor movement; and interesting talks by women such as 
Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm, Nutritionist Adelle Davis, and Suf- 
fragette Jeanette Rankin, the nation's first woman in Congress. 

Politics is often a focal point of discussion. For example, the July 10th 
program was a round table discussion by some of Massachusetts' 
delegates (several women) to the Democratic National Convention. The 
interview was conducted right before their departure for Miami. Future 
programming will continue to offer viable alternatives to the usual media 
fare "for women", with news, talk, music, poetry, etc. 

The producers are Barbara Patterson and Elaine Prostak, who are full- 
time staff members of WFCR. They are interested in all viewpoints, of 
women particularly, whatever their opinion. 

They agree that although they try to have different opinions on their 
radio program, whether movement oriented or not, woman's liberation is 
an integral part of their lives. Their definition of "liberation" is "in- 
formation, not soap box rhetoric", and that is how the show is conducted. 
THE WOMAN'S HOUR may be heard Monday evening at 7:30, repeated 
Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock. 

American Death - Ed 
Lacking Senate Told 



WASHINGTON — Americans 
need to be educated about death, a 
Senate committee was told today. 

"Death is not 'educated for' in 
our population, either for children 
or for adults and death and dying, 
awesome as these events are in the 
life of an individual and his family, 
become even more so by the ab- 
sence of a policy of education," 
said Dr. Melvin J. Krant of Boston. 

He testified before the Senate 
Special Committee on Aging. 



Many Doubt Winthrop Offshore Oil Depot 



A study recommending an off- 
shore terminal for oil tankers three 
miles east of Winthrop drew sharp 
criticism yesterday from 
politicians and environmentalists. 

The $110,000 study, which calls 
for spending $34 million, had been 
kept secret by the Massachusetts 
Port Authority for more than a 
year for fear of the controversy it 
might raise. Disclosed yesterday 
in a newspaper article, the study 
still has not officially been 
released. 

The terminal would consist of a 
1200-foot-long dock anchored to the 
ocean tloor in 60- to 80-foot deep 
waters. A series of 48-inch pipes, 
buried 10 feet in the ocean floor, 
would carry a variety of liquid 
fuels to shore. 

The buried pipe would run under 
Short Beach in Winthrop, Winthrop 
highway and the town dump to 



Belle Isle, a 123-acre salt marsh in 
East Boston owned by the Port 
Authority. 

From a 2.8 million-barrel tank 
farm and pumping station on Belle 
Isle, fuel would be piped to existing 
tank farms on the Chelsea River. 
Pipes along the Chelsea River and 
, to tanks on the Mystic River would 
use existing railroad rights of way. 

A separate pipe system to carry 
jet fuel from the Belle Isle pum- 
pin, station to Logan Airport, the 
report said, will reduce the number 
of fuel trucks using East Boston 
streets. 

The study reportedly claims the 
terminal will help meet New 

England's increasing demand for 
oil while reducing the risk of oil 
spills in Boston Harbor. 

"I can't believe they're serious," 
said John A. S. McGlennon, 



regional administrator for the 
Environmental Protection Agency 
(EPA). He said his agency would 
have "grave reservations for such 
a proposal from an environmental 
point of view." 

A Sierra Club spokesman called 
the plan "drastic" as he announced 
the club's opposition. 

Sen. Mario Omana (D-East 
Boston) and Rep. Ralph E. 
Sirianni, Jr. (D-Winthrop) said 
they were strongly opposed. 

Others questioned the plan while 
hesitating to condemn it without 
examining it first. 

Dr. Charles H.W. Foster, 
Massachusetts secretary of en- 
vironmental affairs, said his office 
would examine the plan carefully 
taking a position. He said "a whole 
slew of permits", including ap- 
proval under the state's new En- 
vironmental Policy Act, would be 
required to effect the plan. 



Ships that deliver oil to the 
Chelsea River tank farms are 
limited to tankers of under 48,000 
tons. The proposed terminal would 
reportedly be able to handle 
100,000-ton class tankers. 

Critics of the proposal suggested 
yesterday that while the terminal 
may reduce oil spills in the harbor, 
it may lead to worse spills at sea. 

"The impact of a supertanker 
breaking up off the New England 
coast would be awesome," 
McGlennon said. "It would make 
the oil spill in Maine look like a 
drop in the bucket." 



ueatn, Krant said, is more 
difficult for the dying in our society 
because most physicians and 
health care institutions prefer to 
deceive the terminally ill about the 
nature of their illness. 

"The inherent implication that 
all disease, including even the 
aging process, can be eradicated, 
places a burden on all dying 
people, or individuals with serious 
terminal illnesses, in the sense that 
in some fashion they are out of 
keeping with national ex- 
pectancy," he said. 

Another factor that makes death 
more difficult, Krant said, is that 
our society discourages the dying 
from remaining in their own homes 
in the care of their loved ones. 

"We need only look at what 
health insurance will pay for to 
realize that economically the 
pressure is severe upon a family to 
keep a sick and dying individual in 
the hospital rather than at home," 
Krant said. 



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Page Four — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1972 



The Magic Circus Held Over 




The Magic Circus, now 
running through Friday in the 
Blue Wall, presents a two-hour 
show of skits and songs. The 
'Circus" consists mainly of a 
series of humorous short acts 
accompanied by light music 
thinly held together by a circus 
motif. 

The Magic Circus does have 
its serious moments, however. 
The short scenes dealing with 
war, politics, disintegrating 
marriages, and people's 
overpossessiveness gave an 
aura of social commentary to 
the show. The clowns, 
magicians, and resident 
magazine hawker rapidly 
restored the feeling of a good 
evening's entertainment. 

(Crier photos by Steve Sch- 
midt) 




TH